Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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The following are some of the persons engaged in this  robbery:
Richard Fristo[e], County Judge, Judge and  General of the Militia, and member of the Presbyterian  church; ; Samuel Hale; , Esq.;  Jones Flournoy; John Smith; —— Hensley, Esq.; , a lawyer; , Lawyer; Samuel C.  Owens, lawyer; Reekman Childs, lawyer; Lewis Frank lin; , Lieut. Governor; Rev. , Baptist missionary, and his son-in-law Likins [Johnston Lykins?]; Love lady, Campbellite; —— Johnson; all of these Reverend  divines, were among this band of plunderers. Many others  were in the number whose names will be forthcoming at  another time; we mention these, because they wished to  be called gentlemen, men of humanity and piety, but we  leave the public to form their own judgement.
Thus, desolated and robbed, the saints were left to seek  homes where they could be found; while their enemies  were pouring a flood of abuse after them, for the purpose  of justifying themselves and hiding their iniquity from the  gaze of that part of the public, who abhor mobocracy.  The majority of them sought homes in , where  they found rest for a little season, and a little season only.  Very shortly after their arrival in , they began  to purchase lands—made improvements—build mills and  other machinery; and in a very short time, were beginning  to enjoy the comforts of life. The immigration continued  without any particular interruption, until they began to  be numerous in the , and surrounding counties.  This order of things continued until 1836, three years;  there was no violence offered, but there were threatenings  of violence. But in the summer of 1836, these threaten ings began to assume a more serious form; from threats,  public meetings were called, resolutions passed; and affairs  assumed a fearful attitude. They began to arm themselves,  and prepare for violence; threatening vengeance and de struction on all who did not leave the forthwith.   had been successful; and seeing the au thorities did not interfere, they boasted that they would  not do it in this instance; and they could drive the saints [p. 13]
The following are some of the persons engaged in this robbery:
Richard Fristoe, County Judge, Judge and General of the Militia, and member of the Presbyterian church; ; Samuel Hale; , Esq.; Jones Flournoy; John Smith; —— Hensley, Esq.; , a lawyer; , Lawyer; Samuel C. Owens, lawyer; Reekman Childs, lawyer; Lewis Franklin; , Lieut. Governor; Rev. , Baptist missionary, and his son-in-law Likins Johnston Lykins; Lovelady, Campbellite; —— Johnson; all of these Reverend divines, were among this band of plunderers. Many others were in the number whose names will be forthcoming at another time; we mention these, because they wished to be called gentlemen, men of humanity and piety, but we leave the public to form their own judgement.
Thus, desolated and robbed, the saints were left to seek homes where they could be found; while their enemies were pouring a flood of abuse after them, for the purpose of justifying themselves and hiding their iniquity from the gaze of that part of the public, who abhor mobocracy. The majority of them sought homes in , where they found rest for a little season, and a little season only. Very shortly after their arrival in , they began to purchase lands—made improvements—build mills and other machinery; and in a very short time, were beginning to enjoy the comforts of life. The immigration continued without any particular interruption, until they began to be numerous in the , and surrounding counties. This order of things continued until 1836, three years; there was no violence offered, but there were threatenings of violence. But in the summer of 1836, these threatenings began to assume a more serious form; from threats, public meetings were called, resolutions passed; and affairs assumed a fearful attitude. They began to arm themselves, and prepare for violence; threatening vengeance and destruction on all who did not leave the forthwith. had been successful; and seeing the authorities did not interfere, they boasted that they would not do it in this instance; and they could drive the saints [p. 13]
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