Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 19
image
mons, to use their own language, should vote. These  threatenings began to assume a very serious tone, very  soon. One kept exciting another, and drinking very free ly, until a man by the name of Richard Weldon, common ly called Dick Weldon, attacked a man by the name of  Samuel Brown, who was but just able to be about, after a  very dangerous fit of sickness. The said Weldon, began  to insult Mr. Brown in a most insolent manner; Mr.  Brown, very mildly told him, that he did not wish to  have any difficulty with him, or any other person; the  other swore that the Mormons were no more fit to vote  than the d—d niggers, and that he would knock him  down; and made an attempt to strike him: A man by  the name of Perry Durfee, being near them, caught Wel don’s hand, and kept him from striking Brown. This, was  no sooner done, than Durfee was knocked down, and a  number of men commenced beating him with clubs,  boards, and any thing they could get. Durfee cried for  help: several men ran into the midst of the crowd, to get  Durfee out of their hands, for the cry was, “kill him, kill  him, d—n him.” The names of those who rushed into  the crowd, were Jackson Steward; ; Henry  Omsted [Harvey Olmsted]; Abram Nelson; and one other man by the name  of Nelson. They succeeded in saving the life of Durfee,  but not until they had knocked down, some twelve or  fifteen men. A large number of from twelve to twenty  rushed on to Steward, crying kill him, God d—n him, kill  him. They had dirks and clubs, and other weapons; one  of them dirked him under the shoulder blade; he called  aloud for assistance, as he fled from them; and they were  on the very eve of stabbing him. A man named , seized a billet of wood, and ran furiously upon them,  knocking down all he came to, until the rest fled before  him, and he rescued Steward out of their hands, having  with his own hands whipped some twenty men. The  total number of the saints in this affray did not exceed ten;  that of the mob, from fifty to a hundred.
The mob then despatched a number of their gang to get  guns and ammunition, swearing that they would kill all  the Saints they could find, or drive them out of , sparing neither men, women, or children. The [p. 19]
mons, to use their own language, should vote. These threatenings began to assume a very serious tone, very soon. One kept exciting another, and drinking very freely, until a man by the name of Richard Weldon, commonly called Dick Weldon, attacked a man by the name of Samuel Brown, who was but just able to be about, after a very dangerous fit of sickness. The said Weldon, began to insult Mr. Brown in a most insolent manner; Mr. Brown, very mildly told him, that he did not wish to have any difficulty with him, or any other person; the other swore that the Mormons were no more fit to vote than the d—d niggers, and that he would knock him down; and made an attempt to strike him: A man by the name of Perry Durfee, being near them, caught Weldon’s hand, and kept him from striking Brown. This, was no sooner done, than Durfee was knocked down, and a number of men commenced beating him with clubs, boards, and any thing they could get. Durfee cried for help: several men ran into the midst of the crowd, to get Durfee out of their hands, for the cry was, “kill him, kill him, d—n him.” The names of those who rushed into the crowd, were Jackson Steward; ; Henry Omsted [Harvey Olmsted]; Abram Nelson; and one other man by the name of Nelson. They succeeded in saving the life of Durfee, but not until they had knocked down, some twelve or fifteen men. A large number of from twelve to twenty rushed on to Steward, crying kill him, God d—n him, kill him. They had dirks and clubs, and other weapons; one of them dirked him under the shoulder blade; he called aloud for assistance, as he fled from them; and they were on the very eve of stabbing him. A man named , seized a billet of wood, and ran furiously upon them, knocking down all he came to, until the rest fled before him, and he rescued Steward out of their hands, having with his own hands whipped some twenty men. The total number of the saints in this affray did not exceed ten; that of the mob, from fifty to a hundred.
The mob then despatched a number of their gang to get guns and ammunition, swearing that they would kill all the Saints they could find, or drive them out of , sparing neither men, women, or children. The [p. 19]
Page 19