Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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from voting; and in order to accomplish their object, had killed two of them, and their bodies were lying on the ground, and that they would not let their friends have them for burial; and that one other man, had fled into the woods, badly wounded; supposed to be dead, as he had not been heard of, after he had disappeared among the bushes. This created a great feeling, and of course much excitement. A physician, who resided in , by the name of , called for volunteers, declared that he would have the bodies of those persons who had been killed, and bury them; and have the man that was lost, or die in the attempt. The report coming from , a resident of the , and the successful candidate for the State senate, no doubt was entertained of its truth. A company was raised consisting, if we recollect right, of about seventeen persons, who left , for the express object of getting the bodies of the dead. Through the course of the day, there was probably to the number of fifty persons, all going to enquire after their friends, for it was unknown to the people of , who of their friends were killed; for no doubt was entertained, but some of them were dead.
When the company arrived there, they found the report not true: there had been a great difficulty; but no lives lost that was known of. But there was nothing heard but threatening—men were passing through the village, which had been laid off, by the saints, threatening them, that in three days they should all be driven out, and the property taken as spoil. It was reported, and that by themselves, too, that there was a large mob gathering at Millport, a small village in ; and that , formerly a Justice of the Peace, and had at the election, been elected one of the County Judges, was at the head of it. It was thought best, seeing he was a peace officer, to go and inquire into the affair. This said , had, a short time before this, sold his possessions to one of the saints, by the name of , and had received two hundred dollars, as part of the payment. A committee was appointed, consisting of five or six persons; the names of three of them, were , , and ; the names of the [p. 23]
from voting; and in order to accomplish their object, had killed two of them, and their bodies were lying on the ground, and that they would not let their friends have them for burial; and that one other man, had fled into the woods, badly wounded; supposed to be dead, as he had not been heard of, after he had disappeared among the bushes. This created a great feeling, and of course much excitement. A physician, who resided in , by the name of , called for volunteers, declared that he would have the bodies of those persons who had been killed, and bury them; and have the man that was lost, or die in the attempt. The report coming from , a resident of the , and the successful candidate for the State senate, no doubt was entertained of its truth. A company was raised consisting, if we recollect right, of about seventeen persons, who left , for the express object of getting the bodies of the dead. Through the course of the day, there was probably to the number of fifty persons, all going to enquire after their friends, for it was unknown to the people of , who of their friends were killed; for no doubt was entertained, but some of them were dead.
When the company arrived there, they found the report not true: there had been a great difficulty; but no lives lost that was known of. But there was nothing heard but threatening—men were passing through the village, which had been laid off, by the saints, threatening them, that in three days they should all be driven out, and the property taken as spoil. It was reported, and that by themselves, too, that there was a large mob gathering at Millport, a small village in ; and that , formerly a Justice of the Peace, and had at the election, been elected one of the County Judges, was at the head of it. It was thought best, seeing he was a peace officer, to go and inquire into the affair. This said , had, a short time before this, sold his possessions to one of the saints, by the name of , and had received two hundred dollars, as part of the payment. A committee was appointed, consisting of five or six persons; the names of three of them, were , , and ; the names of the [p. 23]
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