Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 28
image
The deponent further saith, that no violence was offered  to any individual, in his presence, or within his knowledge;  and that no insulting language was given by either party;  except on the part of Mrs. [Mary Morgan] Black, who, while  was engaged in making out the above named writing  (which he made with his own hand) gave to this deponent,  and others of the society, highly insulting language, and  false accusations, which were calculated in their nature,  to greatly irritate, if possible, the feelings of the bystand ers belonging to said society, in language like this; being  asked by the deponent, if she knew any thing in the Mor men people, derogatory to the character of gentlemen,  she answered in the negative, but said she did not know,  but the object of their visit, was to steal something from  them. After had executed the writing depon ent asked if he had any unfriendly feelings to wards the deponent; and if he had not treated him gen teelly. He answered in the affirmative; deponent then  took leave of said , and repaired to the house of  . The next day we returned to .  And further this deponent saith not.
(Signed) JOSEPH SMITH, Jr.
Sworn to, and subscribed, this fifth day of September,  A. D. 1838.
(Signed) , J. C. C. C. C.
But the case, having undergone a legal investigation,  had no tendency to stop the operations of the mob; but it  tended clearly to show how much sincerity there was, in  their pretended zeal, for the laws; for in open and vowed  violation of them, they went on to collect together, and to  gather into , from , Corrill [Carroll], ,  Clinton, and Platt; and some from : Openly declar ing that they would put the law at defiance, and the saints  should be driven out. They, in the meantime took their  families away from their houses under the pretence of fear:  and ran through the country, from County to County, tell ing how they were driven from their homes—got up  County meetings in the surrounding Counties, particular ly , , Corrill, and . At these meet ings, would be seen preachers of the Gospel, as they called [p. 28]
The deponent further saith, that no violence was offered to any individual, in his presence, or within his knowledge; and that no insulting language was given by either party; except on the part of Mrs. Mary Morgan Black, who, while was engaged in making out the above named writing (which he made with his own hand) gave to this deponent, and others of the society, highly insulting language, and false accusations, which were calculated in their nature, to greatly irritate, if possible, the feelings of the bystanders belonging to said society, in language like this; being asked by the deponent, if she knew any thing in the Mormen people, derogatory to the character of gentlemen, she answered in the negative, but said she did not know, but the object of their visit, was to steal something from them. After had executed the writing deponent asked if he had any unfriendly feelings towards the deponent; and if he had not treated him genteelly. He answered in the affirmative; deponent then took leave of said , and repaired to the house of . The next day we returned to . And further this deponent saith not.
(Signed) JOSEPH SMITH, Jr.
Sworn to, and subscribed, this fifth day of September, A. D. 1838.
(Signed) , J. C. C. C. C.
But the case, having undergone a legal investigation, had no tendency to stop the operations of the mob; but it tended clearly to show how much sincerity there was, in their pretended zeal, for the laws; for in open and vowed violation of them, they went on to collect together, and to gather into , from , Corrill [Carroll], , Clinton, and Platt; and some from : Openly declaring that they would put the law at defiance, and the saints should be driven out. They, in the meantime took their families away from their houses under the pretence of fear: and ran through the country, from County to County, telling how they were driven from their homes—got up County meetings in the surrounding Counties, particularly , , Corrill, and . At these meetings, would be seen preachers of the Gospel, as they called [p. 28]
Page 28