Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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themselve[s], drunkards, profane swearers, and all forming  one company, and all declaring their determination, to aid  their friends, if necessary. In one of these mob meetings  in was seen , States At torney, and now, one of the Judges: also, , who would wish to be called a respectable law yer. At these meetings the most slanderous resolutions  would be passed, that a people, so basely ignorant as they  were could invent. The mob, thus encouraged by judges,  lawyers, priests, &c., kept gathering in large numbers.  The roads were infested with them; companies of armed  men, were passing and repassing in every direction, while  a great majority of the principal men of the country, if  they did not join the mob, used no exertions, to prevent  its operations. Among the rest, that headed a gang of  these ruffians, was , who was the same  season elected to the State Senate. He had but a short  time before, been converted, and united with the bap tist church.
The whole body made its way to .  On ’s arrival, the saints were summoned to send  a flag into his camp, forthwith, and receive terms at his  hand. They however, paid no attention to the mandate  of this new potentate. After they had, as they supposed,  got sufficiently strong, they commenced taking cattle,  corn, &c., to feed their army. Cattle, horses and grain,  were taken with a liberal hand; and they publicly boasted,  that they “lived on Mormon beef, and Mormon corn.”  The saints dare not leave their homes, for if they did, they  were stopped on the road,—they were shot at—their  horses taken from them, and to all appearance, they would  be ruined. All the time, the mob had their runners, tell ing that their wives and children were driven from their  homes; that their fences were thrown down, and the  Mormons were destroying all they had: Their wives  and children, were either in the camp, or else sent off to  some of their friends in the adjoining Counties: and all  this, they pretended was through fear. But, to certain of  their friends, they said their object in so doing was, to keep  the public ignorant of their real design; for they did not [p. 29]
themselves, drunkards, profane swearers, and all forming one company, and all declaring their determination, to aid their friends, if necessary. In one of these mob meetings in was seen , States Attorney, and now, one of the Judges: also, , who would wish to be called a respectable lawyer. At these meetings the most slanderous resolutions would be passed, that a people, so basely ignorant as they were could invent. The mob, thus encouraged by judges, lawyers, priests, &c., kept gathering in large numbers. The roads were infested with them; companies of armed men, were passing and repassing in every direction, while a great majority of the principal men of the country, if they did not join the mob, used no exertions, to prevent its operations. Among the rest, that headed a gang of these ruffians, was , who was the same season elected to the State Senate. He had but a short time before, been converted, and united with the baptist church.
The whole body made its way to . On ’s arrival, the saints were summoned to send a flag into his camp, forthwith, and receive terms at his hand. They however, paid no attention to the mandate of this new potentate. After they had, as they supposed, got sufficiently strong, they commenced taking cattle, corn, &c., to feed their army. Cattle, horses and grain, were taken with a liberal hand; and they publicly boasted, that they “lived on Mormon beef, and Mormon corn.” The saints dare not leave their homes, for if they did, they were stopped on the road,—they were shot at—their horses taken from them, and to all appearance, they would be ruined. All the time, the mob had their runners, telling that their wives and children were driven from their homes; that their fences were thrown down, and the Mormons were destroying all they had: Their wives and children, were either in the camp, or else sent off to some of their friends in the adjoining Counties: and all this, they pretended was through fear. But, to certain of their friends, they said their object in so doing was, to keep the public ignorant of their real design; for they did not [p. 29]
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