Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 30
image
wish their women and children there, when they drove the  Mormons out, lest they might get hurt. The saints were  all the time, making application to the authorities of the  country, to put down the mob. Messengers after messen gers were sent to the Military officers, and to the Judge  of the Court to get them to send to the , if neces sary, and put an end to the ravages of this banditti: and  after much exertion, and much labor, at last, the Judge  ordered out the militia. was ordered  out as the commander-in-chief; being a Major General.  Brigadier Generals, and , were both or dered out with their brigades. They put their forces  under orders, and took up their line of march for —the scene of trouble.
On their arrival, they took a position between where  the mob was encamped, and . Instead,  however, of these generals, which was their duty to have  done, going and arresting this band of plunderers and  murderers, which they truly were; and having them forth with brought to justice; they went to tampering with  them. The mob complained to them, that their property  had been stolen and destroyed, by the saints. The offi cers went to their houses, which they had evacuated, and  found some of them open, and all their property in them,  as they left it, and nothing disturbed. They continued  the investigation, until they became satisfied that if any  of their (the mob’s) property was taken, they took it  themselves, to raise a false alarm; or at least, the officers,  all said so. The mob openly and fearlessly declared to  them that “they lived on Mormon beef and Mormon corn.”  The saints required of the officers, that they should be ar rested and brought to justice, for plundering their property;  unlawfully assembling to drive peaceable citizens from their  homes; and for threatening their lives, and keeping them  in fear; in open violation of the laws of the . When  these things were pressed upon them, they excused the  matter, by saying that their troops were so mutinous and  rebellious they dare not venture to do it. The course  they took, to quell the mob, however, was a singular one:  and if those gentlemen think, that in doing as they did,  they discharged their duty; and can feel as if their oath of [p. 30]
wish their women and children there, when they drove the Mormons out, lest they might get hurt. The saints were all the time, making application to the authorities of the country, to put down the mob. Messengers after messengers were sent to the Military officers, and to the Judge of the Court to get them to send to the , if necessary, and put an end to the ravages of this banditti: and after much exertion, and much labor, at last, the Judge ordered out the militia. was ordered out as the commander-in-chief; being a Major General. Brigadier Generals, and , were both ordered out with their brigades. They put their forces under orders, and took up their line of march for —the scene of trouble.
On their arrival, they took a position between where the mob was encamped, and . Instead, however, of these generals, which was their duty to have done, going and arresting this band of plunderers and murderers, which they truly were; and having them forthwith brought to justice; they went to tampering with them. The mob complained to them, that their property had been stolen and destroyed, by the saints. The officers went to their houses, which they had evacuated, and found some of them open, and all their property in them, as they left it, and nothing disturbed. They continued the investigation, until they became satisfied that if any of their (the mob’s) property was taken, they took it themselves, to raise a false alarm; or at least, the officers, all said so. The mob openly and fearlessly declared to them that “they lived on Mormon beef and Mormon corn.” The saints required of the officers, that they should be arrested and brought to justice, for plundering their property; unlawfully assembling to drive peaceable citizens from their homes; and for threatening their lives, and keeping them in fear; in open violation of the laws of the . When these things were pressed upon them, they excused the matter, by saying that their troops were so mutinous and rebellious they dare not venture to do it. The course they took, to quell the mob, however, was a singular one: and if those gentlemen think, that in doing as they did, they discharged their duty; and can feel as if their oath of [p. 30]
Page 30