Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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them, would acquit the mob, notwithstanding, the mob  would boast of their crimes in their presence. Up till this  time, there was not a military or civil officer in ,  who had been called upon to quell this gang of plunderers,  that would abide by his oath of office; from the  down. When the civil officers were called upon, they  would give decisions, the most barefaced violations of law,  ever given by mortals; so much so, that they knew they  were violating their oaths, when they did it. When the  military were called upon, instead of bringing the mob to  justice; they would call them Militia; which could be  for no other purpose, but to keep them from the punish ment justly due to their crimes. After the mob had been  honorably dismissed as Militia, and ordered home, they  took up their line of march directly to , in Corrill  County, to drive out a settlement of the saints in that  place. The history of which settlement we shall here after give.
Part of the mob which was at was from  Corrill County. Their principal leader, was , commonly called . He was a  Presbyterian Preacher. There was another Presbyte rian Preacher with the Corrill County mob, by the name  of Hancock. After the mob had departed for Corrill  County; the inhabitants of that had belonged to  the mob, began to make proposals to the saints, either to  sell or buy. Two committees were appointed for this  purpose, one on each part: after some arrangements in  relation to the matter, the committee on the part of the  saints, agreed to buy out all the possessions which the  mob had in , and purchases were making  of their lands and crops (the land consisted in pre-emp tion rights, as the land in that part of the had not  as yet come into market) every day, and payment made,  until there was some twenty-five thousand dollars worth  of property bought from the mob, in improvements and  crops. While these operations were going on, the mob  would occasionally boast, that when they had got pay ment for their lands and crops, they would rise up, and  drive the saints out and keep both their lands and their  crops. They also sold a large quantity of hogs, some [p. 34]
them, would acquit the mob, notwithstanding, the mob would boast of their crimes in their presence. Up till this time, there was not a military or civil officer in , who had been called upon to quell this gang of plunderers, that would abide by his oath of office; from the down. When the civil officers were called upon, they would give decisions, the most barefaced violations of law, ever given by mortals; so much so, that they knew they were violating their oaths, when they did it. When the military were called upon, instead of bringing the mob to justice; they would call them Militia; which could be for no other purpose, but to keep them from the punishment justly due to their crimes. After the mob had been honorably dismissed as Militia, and ordered home, they took up their line of march directly to , in Corrill County, to drive out a settlement of the saints in that place. The history of which settlement we shall hereafter give.
Part of the mob which was at was from Corrill County. Their principal leader, was , commonly called . He was a Presbyterian Preacher. There was another Presbyterian Preacher with the Corrill County mob, by the name of Hancock. After the mob had departed for Corrill County; the inhabitants of that had belonged to the mob, began to make proposals to the saints, either to sell or buy. Two committees were appointed for this purpose, one on each part: after some arrangements in relation to the matter, the committee on the part of the saints, agreed to buy out all the possessions which the mob had in , and purchases were making of their lands and crops (the land consisted in pre-emption rights, as the land in that part of the had not as yet come into market) every day, and payment made, until there was some twenty-five thousand dollars worth of property bought from the mob, in improvements and crops. While these operations were going on, the mob would occasionally boast, that when they had got payment for their lands and crops, they would rise up, and drive the saints out and keep both their lands and their crops. They also sold a large quantity of hogs, some [p. 34]
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