Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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live in their wagons or in tents, or at least, the greater  part of them. Application was made to the Judge of the  Circuit Court for deliverance; and two companies of Mili tia were ordered out: One of the companies was com manded by , a methodist preacher. The  whole was put under the command of ; but they never made the first attempt to disperse  the mob. When the people of , enquired of ,  the reason of his conduct, he always replied, that  and his company were so mutinous and mobocratic, that  he dare not venture to attempt a dispersion of the mob;  saying that if he did, and his company, instead of  dispersing the mob, would unite with them. A messenger  was sent with a petition to the , requesting aid  from him. The man who took the petition, was by the  name of Caldwell. He went and saw the , and  received for answer, that the Mormons had got into a  scrape, and they might fight it out; for he would have noth ing to do with it. This was the return made to the citi zens of .
The people finding themselves pressed on every hand  wtih difficulties, and a mob threatening their lives, and not  only threatening, but using all their efforts to take them;  for scouting parties were round in every dirction, steal ing cattle, horses, and all kinds of property that they could  get. They set fire to a house owned by a man by the  name of , and burnt it to ashes; and the  man and his family barely escaped with their lives. Num bers of them died for want of proper attendance in sick ness; for they had been deprived from making any provi sion whatever, for their families, many of whom were sick,  laying in wagons and in tents without any other shelter.  Many females, that were in delicate situations, gave birth  to children under these forbidding circumstances: and to  crown all, their provisions were getting very low, and they  could see nothing but actual starvation before them, by  continuing where they were. This, added to the sickness  in their midst, made their case deplorable indeed. Pa rents had to stand still, and witness the death of their chil dren without the means, even to make them comforable  in their dying moments: and children had to do the same [p. 39]
live in their wagons or in tents, or at least, the greater part of them. Application was made to the Judge of the Circuit Court for deliverance; and two companies of Militia were ordered out: One of the companies was commanded by , a methodist preacher. The whole was put under the command of ; but they never made the first attempt to disperse the mob. When the people of , enquired of , the reason of his conduct, he always replied, that and his company were so mutinous and mobocratic, that he dare not venture to attempt a dispersion of the mob; saying that if he did, and his company, instead of dispersing the mob, would unite with them. A messenger was sent with a petition to the , requesting aid from him. The man who took the petition, was by the name of Caldwell. He went and saw the , and received for answer, that the Mormons had got into a scrape, and they might fight it out; for he would have nothing to do with it. This was the return made to the citizens of .
The people finding themselves pressed on every hand wtih difficulties, and a mob threatening their lives, and not only threatening, but using all their efforts to take them; for scouting parties were round in every dirction, stealing cattle, horses, and all kinds of property that they could get. They set fire to a house owned by a man by the name of , and burnt it to ashes; and the man and his family barely escaped with their lives. Numbers of them died for want of proper attendance in sickness; for they had been deprived from making any provision whatever, for their families, many of whom were sick, laying in wagons and in tents without any other shelter. Many females, that were in delicate situations, gave birth to children under these forbidding circumstances: and to crown all, their provisions were getting very low, and they could see nothing but actual starvation before them, by continuing where they were. This, added to the sickness in their midst, made their case deplorable indeed. Parents had to stand still, and witness the death of their children without the means, even to make them comforable in their dying moments: and children had to do the same [p. 39]
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