Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 45
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and well painted, he came into , and  took cattle and horses &c.; and the people of  had to set guards, to protect their property.
Some short time after commenced his operations,  messengers came to , reporting, that in the  south part of , there was a body of armed men,  threatening the lives of the people, and ordering them  out of the by 11 o’clock the next morning under  pain of death, unless they would renounce their religion:  that they had burned, and were burning houses—had set  fire to a wagon-load of goods, which a man had not  unloaded at his door—that they were breaking into houses —taking their guns, and they had actually taken  three prisoners. The same report reached, again about  midnight. On the arrival of the second report, the be forementioned , took about sixty men, and  went to enquire into the affair. When he got to the  place, the mob had moved: he went in pursuit, and un expectedly, fell in with their guards. The guard fired, and  killed one of his men. then ordered a rush: they  immediately fell on them; the company fled very soon,  but not until was killed, and a man by the  name of ; the name of one killed by  the guard, was . , reported  one killed, and a number wounded.
After this affray, the men returned home. But all peace  had fled away; mobbing parties were in every direction:  it was dangerous for a man to go any distance from his  house; if he did, and was on horseback, a gang of mobbers  would take his horse from him; or if with a wagon and  team, the wagon and team, would both be taken, and this  would be the last of them. These parties, were throwing  down fences, and turning creatures into cornfields, turnip,  and potatoe patches, &c. Some who were considered  first in the , were engaged in this foul business.  Such as , senator; Judge Smith, a  judge in the Court; and men of this stamp,  were not only there, but leaders, and excited others to  acts of wickedness.
Matters continued thus, until the 29th of October. On  this day, a large army came and halted in a little skirt of [p. 45]
and well painted, he came into , and took cattle and horses &c.; and the people of had to set guards, to protect their property.
Some short time after commenced his operations, messengers came to , reporting, that in the south part of , there was a body of armed men, threatening the lives of the people, and ordering them out of the by 11 o’clock the next morning under pain of death, unless they would renounce their religion: that they had burned, and were burning houses—had set fire to a wagon-load of goods, which a man had not unloaded at his door—that they were breaking into houses—taking their guns, and they had actually taken three prisoners. The same report reached, again about midnight. On the arrival of the second report, the beforementioned , took about sixty men, and went to enquire into the affair. When he got to the place, the mob had moved: he went in pursuit, and unexpectedly, fell in with their guards. The guard fired, and killed one of his men. then ordered a rush: they immediately fell on them; the company fled very soon, but not until was killed, and a man by the name of ; the name of one killed by the guard, was . , reported one killed, and a number wounded.
After this affray, the men returned home. But all peace had fled away; mobbing parties were in every direction: it was dangerous for a man to go any distance from his house; if he did, and was on horseback, a gang of mobbers would take his horse from him; or if with a wagon and team, the wagon and team, would both be taken, and this would be the last of them. These parties, were throwing down fences, and turning creatures into cornfields, turnip, and potatoe patches, &c. Some who were considered first in the , were engaged in this foul business. Such as , senator; Judge Smith, a judge in the Court; and men of this stamp, were not only there, but leaders, and excited others to acts of wickedness.
Matters continued thus, until the 29th of October. On this day, a large army came and halted in a little skirt of [p. 45]
Page 45