Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 47
image
harm done to it, that night: but still there were maraud ing parties, which were threatening to burn it; and in con sequence, it was thought best to throw up a little breast work around the town, and set guards to watch their  movements. This, done, it was composed of rails, house- logs, empty wagons, &c.
As their custom had been from the beginning, so it was  now; with his banditti of painted ruf fians, were incorporated with the army and called Militia;  and this was an atonement for all the thefts, robberies,  and other outrages, which they had committed against  the public peace.
Sometime in the course of the next day, after the arriv al of ’ army, we were made acquainted  with the fact, that they were there, by the orders of the  . Until this time, we supposed that they were  a mob. Here follows the ’s order:
Head Quarters of the Militia,)
City of Jefferson,)
Oct. 27th, 1838.)
Sir,
Since the order of the morning to you, directing you  to come with four hundred mounted men, to be raised  within your Division, I have received, by ,  Esq., and Wiley C. Williams, Esq., one of my aids, in formation of the most appalling character, which changes  entirely the face of things, and places the Mormons in  the attitude of an avowed defiance of the laws, and of  having made war upon the people of this . Your  orders are therefore, to hasten your operations and en deavor to reach in Ray County, with all possi ble speed. The Mormons must be treated as enemies  and must be exterminated, or driven from the , if  necessary for the public peace.
Their outrages, are beyond all description. If you can  increase your force, you are authorized to do so, to any  extent you may think necessary. I have just issued orders  to Major General Wollock of Marion County, to raise five  hundred men, and to march them to the northern part of   and there to unite with of [p. 47]
harm done to it, that night: but still there were marauding parties, which were threatening to burn it; and in consequence, it was thought best to throw up a little breastwork around the town, and set guards to watch their movements. This, done, it was composed of rails, house-logs, empty wagons, &c.
As their custom had been from the beginning, so it was now; with his banditti of painted ruffians, were incorporated with the army and called Militia; and this was an atonement for all the thefts, robberies, and other outrages, which they had committed against the public peace.
Sometime in the course of the next day, after the arrival of ’ army, we were made acquainted with the fact, that they were there, by the orders of the . Until this time, we supposed that they were a mob. Here follows the ’s order:
Head Quarters of the Militia,)
City of Jefferson,)
Oct. 27th, 1838.)
Sir,
Since the order of the morning to you, directing you to come with four hundred mounted men, to be raised within your Division, I have received, by , Esq., and Wiley C. Williams, Esq., one of my aids, information of the most appalling character, which changes entirely the face of things, and places the Mormons in the attitude of an avowed defiance of the laws, and of having made war upon the people of this . Your orders are therefore, to hasten your operations and endeavor to reach in Ray County, with all possible speed. The Mormons must be treated as enemies and must be exterminated, or driven from the , if necessary for the public peace.
Their outrages, are beyond all description. If you can increase your force, you are authorized to do so, to any extent you may think necessary. I have just issued orders to Major General Wollock of Marion County, to raise five hundred men, and to march them to the northern part of and there to unite with of [p. 47]
Page 47