Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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a stop to the immigration, but drive those out of the , who were settled there.
These meetings were public things, called and held in  the face of the government, published in the public papers.  At these meetings, they publicly declared that they would  put the laws of the at defiance, in order to ac complish their object, as well as justice and humanity,  which finally they did.
In order to justify themselves in violating the laws of  both God and man, the laws, both of the State of  and the , they had recourse to fabricating,  and circulating the most foolish and senseless lies, that  mortals could invent; thinking, by that means, to justify  themselves before the public. Such as, the saints were  building strong fortifications; bringing cannon and other  military implements into the country; that wagons loaded  with coffins were coming in great numbers, and that these  coffins were full of ammunition and military stores—that  the saints are conniving with the Indians, and stirring up  the negroes to rebel against their masters, with a multi tude of things of a similar character: which all tend to  establish the ignorance and corruption of their authors.  To such low and mean subterfuges, were the principal  men of and vicinity, driven to accomplish  an object at which humanity to the latest ages must recoil.  We shall give the names of the principal actors in this  scene of abomination, that the American people may here after know them.
After having, as they supposed, made a sufficient pre par[a]tion to accomplish their object, and fabricated and  circulated through the medium of their public papers, a ne cessary quantity of lies to blind the public mind, (for they  verily supposed, that all the American people were as desti tute of truth and humanity, as themselves) they com menced their operations.
These things transpired, between the first of July and  the middle of November, 1833. The mob made their at tack, by tearing down houses and destroying property. A   was torn down, the press broken, the type  scattered through the streets; all the book work, papers, and  materials that were in the office were destroyed, in all [p. 6]
a stop to the immigration, but drive those out of the , who were settled there.
These meetings were public things, called and held in the face of the government, published in the public papers. At these meetings, they publicly declared that they would put the laws of the at defiance, in order to accomplish their object, as well as justice and humanity, which finally they did.
In order to justify themselves in violating the laws of both God and man, the laws, both of the State of and the , they had recourse to fabricating, and circulating the most foolish and senseless lies, that mortals could invent; thinking, by that means, to justify themselves before the public. Such as, the saints were building strong fortifications; bringing cannon and other military implements into the country; that wagons loaded with coffins were coming in great numbers, and that these coffins were full of ammunition and military stores—that the saints are conniving with the Indians, and stirring up the negroes to rebel against their masters, with a multitude of things of a similar character: which all tend to establish the ignorance and corruption of their authors. To such low and mean subterfuges, were the principal men of and vicinity, driven to accomplish an object at which humanity to the latest ages must recoil. We shall give the names of the principal actors in this scene of abomination, that the American people may hereafter know them.
After having, as they supposed, made a sufficient preparation to accomplish their object, and fabricated and circulated through the medium of their public papers, a necessary quantity of lies to blind the public mind, (for they verily supposed, that all the American people were as destitute of truth and humanity, as themselves) they commenced their operations.
These things transpired, between the first of July and the middle of November, 1833. The mob made their attack, by tearing down houses and destroying property. A was torn down, the press broken, the type scattered through the streets; all the book work, papers, and materials that were in the office were destroyed, in all [p. 6]
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