Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 62
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then asked him if the way was not guarded, so that I would  be in no danger in passing the roads. He said he would  give me a pass or ticket which would carry me safely  through the , provided I continued to travel in an  Eastward course, and minded my own business. We soon  parted, and on the next day I went to the mill and receiv ed my pass which reads as follows. Having the original  in my possession I give it verbatim.
November 13, 1838.
This is to certify that , a Mormon, is per mitted to leave and pass through the State of in  an eastward direction unmolested during good behaveour.
,
Capt. Militia.
The next day Hiram Comstock, the ’s brother,  with two or three others, brought a prisoner to me to see  if I knew him; I told them I had seen him, but did not  know his name. After questioning me for some time, they  told me to go with them into their camp, and said I might  consider myself a prisoner. They kept me until the next  day, and set me at liberty charging me to be gone from  the forthwith. I was compelled to comply with  these orders at the the sacrifice of all I had, and leave the  state of agreeably to the order of the  of that , a thing unprecedented in the history of the  world. I was taught to hold sacred the rights of man in  my childhood. I was raised in Kentucky, born in 1814,  and lived in that state until April, 1837. Such doctrine  as taught and practiced in , by the officers of that   was never taught, neither practiced in my native  state.
.
 
We will now return to the prisoners. They had mean ly betrayed us into their hands; we were kept in their  camp till the third day of November; we then start ed for . Let us here observe that they  increased our number having added to it Messrs. and . By our special request,  they took us into to see our families, whom we [p. 62]
then asked him if the way was not guarded, so that I would be in no danger in passing the roads. He said he would give me a pass or ticket which would carry me safely through the , provided I continued to travel in an Eastward course, and minded my own business. We soon parted, and on the next day I went to the mill and received my pass which reads as follows. Having the original in my possession I give it verbatim.
November 13, 1838.
This is to certify that , a Mormon, is permitted to leave and pass through the State of in an eastward direction unmolested during good behaveour.
,
Capt. Militia.
The next day Hiram Comstock, the ’s brother, with two or three others, brought a prisoner to me to see if I knew him; I told them I had seen him, but did not know his name. After questioning me for some time, they told me to go with them into their camp, and said I might consider myself a prisoner. They kept me until the next day, and set me at liberty charging me to be gone from the forthwith. I was compelled to comply with these orders at the the sacrifice of all I had, and leave the state of agreeably to the order of the of that , a thing unprecedented in the history of the world. I was taught to hold sacred the rights of man in my childhood. I was raised in Kentucky, born in 1814, and lived in that state until April, 1837. Such doctrine as taught and practiced in , by the officers of that was never taught, neither practiced in my native state.
.
 
We will now return to the prisoners. They had meanly betrayed us into their hands; we were kept in their camp till the third day of November; we then started for . Let us here observe that they increased our number having added to it Messrs. and . By our special request, they took us into to see our families, whom we [p. 62]
Page 62