Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 81
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on high, with thanksgiving and praise, to the Author of our  existence, for that beneficent act.
In laying our case before your honorable body, we say  that we are willing, and ever have been to conform to the  constitution and laws of the , and of this  . We ask in common with others, the protection  of the laws. We ask for the privilege guaranteed to all  free citizens of the and of this to be  extended to us, that we may be permitted to settle and  live where we please, and worship God according to the  dictates of our own conscience without molestation. And  while we ask for ourselves this privilege we are willing all  others should enjoy the same.
We now lay our case at the feet of your legislature,  and ask your honorable body to consider it, and do for us,  after mature deliberation, that which your wisdom, pat riotism, and philanthropy may dictate. And we, as in  duty bound, will ever pray, &c.
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,
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A committee appointed by the citizens of to draft this memorial, and sign it in their behalf.
, Caldwell Co., Mo., Dec. 10, 1838.
 
The following address, was delivered at , by  , to the Mormons, after they had surren dered their arms, and themselves prisoners of war:
Gentlemen—You whose names are not attached to  this list of names will now have the privilege of going to  your fields to obtain corn for your families, wood, &c.  Those that are now taken, will go thence to prison;  be tried, and receive the due demerit of their crimes—but  you are now at liberty, all but such as charges may be here after preferred against. It now devolves upon you to ful [p. 81]
on high, with thanksgiving and praise, to the Author of our existence, for that beneficent act.
In laying our case before your honorable body, we say that we are willing, and ever have been to conform to the constitution and laws of the , and of this . We ask in common with others, the protection of the laws. We ask for the privilege guaranteed to all free citizens of the and of this to be extended to us, that we may be permitted to settle and live where we please, and worship God according to the dictates of our own conscience without molestation. And while we ask for ourselves this privilege we are willing all others should enjoy the same.
We now lay our case at the feet of your legislature, and ask your honorable body to consider it, and do for us, after mature deliberation, that which your wisdom, patriotism, and philanthropy may dictate. And we, as in duty bound, will ever pray, &c.
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
.
A committee appointed by the citizens of to draft this memorial, and sign it in their behalf.
, Caldwell Co., Mo., Dec. 10, 1838.
 
The following address, was delivered at , by , to the Mormons, after they had surrendered their arms, and themselves prisoners of war:
Gentlemen—You whose names are not attached to this list of names will now have the privilege of going to your fields to obtain corn for your families, wood, &c. Those that are now taken, will go thence to prison; be tried, and receive the due demerit of their crimes—but you are now at liberty, all but such as charges may be hereafter preferred against. It now devolves upon you to ful [p. 81]
Page 81