Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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, Lieutenant Governor; the latter lived in , the seat of the mob, and County seat of . But no aid or protection could be had.
Having sought protection of the authorities of the ,  and obtained none, the saints at last had recourse to arms.  After they took up arms in their own defence, several bat tles were fought, in which one of the saints was killed, and  a number wounded. Two of the mob were killed, and sev eral wounded. At last a number of them under the com mand of marched to , where  a great multitude of the mob was collected for the purpose  of giving them battle. , hearing of their inten tions to give battle to the mob, organized the mob, and called  them the Militia under the command of . On the arrival of , he was commanded  to surrender his arms and those who were with him. This  order, was given by the said ; this, they  refused to do, until he, , gave the strongest assur ances to and company that if they would, they  should be protected, and return home in peace, and none  should disturb them. After these assurances were given,  they gave up their arms. But now, reader for the se quel!
Did these high-minded and honorable men comply with  their covenant? no, indeed, but something very different!  They seized on the guns and other arms as a prey; and  have kept them as plunder to this day; and having the saints  disarmed, they carried their violence to all kinds of shameful  lengths; men, women and children, were driven from their  houses in the night, barefoot and nearly naked. This  was about the middle of November. The men were whip ped and abused beyond all descripton. A man, by the  name of Benjamin Putnam, was whipped to death; his  body was taken up a day or two afterwards and buried.  Others were whipped until they had to tie handkerchiefs  round them, to keep their bowels from falling out. A  man by the name of [Lyman] Leonard was knocked down in his  house with a chair, and was beat on the head and other  parts of the body, until the blood was running from him on  the floor. His wife fearing lest they should kill him, ran  and threw herself on him; begging for his life; but the [p. 9]
, Lieutenant Governor; the latter lived in , the seat of the mob, and County seat of . But no aid or protection could be had.
Having sought protection of the authorities of the , and obtained none, the saints at last had recourse to arms. After they took up arms in their own defence, several battles were fought, in which one of the saints was killed, and a number wounded. Two of the mob were killed, and several wounded. At last a number of them under the command of marched to , where a great multitude of the mob was collected for the purpose of giving them battle. , hearing of their intentions to give battle to the mob, organized the mob, and called them the Militia under the command of . On the arrival of , he was commanded to surrender his arms and those who were with him. This order, was given by the said ; this, they refused to do, until he, , gave the strongest assurances to and company that if they would, they should be protected, and return home in peace, and none should disturb them. After these assurances were given, they gave up their arms. But now, reader for the sequel!
Did these high-minded and honorable men comply with their covenant? no, indeed, but something very different! They seized on the guns and other arms as a prey; and have kept them as plunder to this day; and having the saints disarmed, they carried their violence to all kinds of shameful lengths; men, women and children, were driven from their houses in the night, barefoot and nearly naked. This was about the middle of November. The men were whipped and abused beyond all descripton. A man, by the name of Benjamin Putnam, was whipped to death; his body was taken up a day or two afterwards and buried. Others were whipped until they had to tie handkerchiefs round them, to keep their bowels from falling out. A man by the name of Lyman Leonard was knocked down in his house with a chair, and was beat on the head and other parts of the body, until the blood was running from him on the floor. His wife fearing lest they should kill him, ran and threw herself on him; begging for his life; but the [p. 9]
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