Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 43[a]
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We will now return to the prisoners,  they had meanly betrayed into their hands.
We were kept in their camp till  the third day of November, we were then take  to started with for . Let  us here observe, that they had increased our  number, having added to <it> Messrs , and . By our speci al request, they took us into “ to see our families, whom we found  when we got there, living on parched corn,  as the town was so closely invested  they could not get out. I will <not> attempt  to discribe this parting scene, I  will leave every person to place themse lves in our situation, and the then judge  for themselves.
In writing <this> narative, it is no pa rt of our intention to play upon the  passions of the publick, but give a faith full narative of facts, and there leave it.
After we arived at ,  the county seat of , we served  the same purpose that a caravan of  wild animals would: for <For> a show!! as hund reds of people called to <see> us. We were put  into an old house, and left to sleep on  some blankets we had carried with us.
Shortly after we had started from  ” a messenger came riding  after us, with a demand from to take us <back,> with this general [p. 43[a]]
We will now return to the prisoners, they had meanly betrayed into their hands.
We were kept in their camp till the third day of November, we were then started for . Let us here observe, that they had increased our number, having added to it Messrs , and . By our special request, they took us into “” to see our families, whom we found when we got there, living on parched corn, as the town was so closely invested they could not get out. I will not attempt to discribe this parting scene, I will leave every person to place themselves in our situation, and then judge for themselves.
In writing this narative, it is no part of our intention to play upon the passions of the publick, but give a faithfull narative of facts, and there leave it.
After we arived at , the county seat of , we served the same purpose that a caravan of wild animals would: For a show!! as hundreds of people called to see us. We were put into an old house, and left to sleep on some blankets we had carried with us.
Shortly after we had started from “” a messenger came riding after us, with a demand from to take us back, with this general [p. 43[a]]
Page 43[a]