Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 5[a]
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After they had robbed<plundered> the houses, robbed the henroosts, and carried <off> every thing which was valuable, they burned the houses, amounting in all to upwards of two hundred, and then commenced a general distruction of the timber on the land. Some tracts, that were well timbered, was <were> soon stripped of every tree. Such of the farms as they did not occupy, they took all the railes off of <from> them, and used them for their own purposes. There were a number <several> of thousands acres of land thus seazed on which improvements were made to a considerable extent, and the owners utterly forbid to enjoy them, and the<y> owners have been compelled to sell them, for no valuable consideration, and this banditta of ruffians, <usurpers>, are those now enjoying them.
While these brutalities were going on, the publick papers were constantly imployed in giving publicity to the foulest lies that could be made <created,> and in this foul business, the religious papers generally in the country was <were> imployed, and dilligently engaged. It was no uncommon thing to hear a <the> peachers and other of the different denominations, using all their influence to justify these barbarities or at best, to conceel the real facts from those over whom he could have influence over the view of the world.
While this mob was e[n]gaged in their cours[e] of plunder— for is was altogether a plundering and robbing business, there were outrages of the most extraordinary business character committed by them to ever committed by human beings The plans they laid in order to plunder were of the most extraordinary kind. They swear <serve> of out some a w[r]its against <on> those whom the[y] wanted to plunder [p. 5[a]]
After they had plundered the houses, robbed the henroosts, and carried off every thing which was valuable, they burned the houses, amounting in all to upwards of two hundred, and then commenced a general distruction of the timber on the land. Some tracts, that were well timbered, were soon stripped of every tree. Such of the farms as they did not occupy, they took all the railes from them, and used them for their own purposes. There were several of thousands acres of land thus seazed on which improvements were made to a considerable extent, and the owners utterly forbid to enjoy them, and they have been compelled to sell them, for no valuable consideration, and this , usurpers, are now enjoying them.
While these brutalities were going on, the publick papers were constantly imployed in giving publicity to the foulest lies that could be created,
While this mob was engaged in their course of plunder— for is was altogether a plundering and robbing business, there were outrages of the most extraordinary character committed by them ever committed by human beings The plans they laid in order to plunder were of the most extraordinary kind. They serve writs on those whom they wanted to plunder [p. 5[a]]
Page 5[a]