Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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— Govelady Campbellite, — Johnson Metho dist, all these reverend devines, were among  this band of plunderers.
Many others were in the number, whose  names will be forth coming at another time; we  mention these, because they wished to be called  gentlemen, and men of humanity and piety; but we  leave the publick, to form their own judgement.
Thus, desolated and robbend, the saints  were left to seek homes where they could be found,  while their enemies and robbers, were pouring a flood  of abuse after <them>, for the purpose of justifying themselves,  and hiding ther iniquity from the gaze of that part  of the publick, who abhor mobacracy. The greater  majority of them, saught homes in , where  they found rest, for a little season, and a little seas on only. Very shortly after their arival in ,  they move into p began to purchase lands, make imp rovements, build mills and carry other machinery,  and in a very short time, were begining to enjoy the  comforts of life. The emigration continued with out any particular, attention <interruption>, till they began to  <to be> numerous in the and surounding counties.  This order of things continued till 1836, three years;  there was no violence offered, but there was <were> threat nings of violence, But in the summer of 1836,  these threatnings began to assume a more seri ous form; from threatnings, publick meetings  were called, resolutions passed, and f affairs assumed  a fearfull attitude. They began to arm thems el[ve]s, and prepare for violence, threatning vengence  and distruction, to <on> all who did not leave the   forthwith. had been  so successfull, and seeing the authorities would not  interfere, they boasted that they would not do it in [p. 6[a]]
— Govelady Campbellite, — Johnson , all these reverend devines, were among this band of plunderers.
Many others were in the number, whose names will be forth coming at another time; we mention these, because they wished to be called gentlemen, men of humanity and piety; but we leave the publick, to form their own judgement.
Thus, desolated and robbend, the saints were left to seek homes where they could be found, while their enemies , were pouring a flood of abuse after them, for the purpose of justifying themselves, and hiding ther iniquity from the gaze of that part of the publick, who abhor mobacracy. The majority of them, saught homes in , where they found rest, for a little season, and a little season only. Very shortly after their arival in , they began to purchase lands, make improvements, build mills and other machinery, and in a very short time, were begining to enjoy the comforts of life. The emigration continued without any particular, interruption, till they began to be numerous in the and surounding counties. This order of things continued till 1836, three years; there was no violence offered, but there were threatnings of violence, But in the summer of 1836, these threatnings began to assume a more serious form; from threatnings, publick meetings were called, resolutions passed, and f affairs assumed a fearfull attitude. They began to arm themselves, and prepare for violence, threatning vengence and distruction, on all who did not leave the forthwith. had been so successfull, and seeing the authorities would not interfere, they boasted that they would not do it in [p. 6[a]]
Page 6[a]