Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 7[a]
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[a]nd their wives rejoicing at there abuses, of the  females. the circuit Judge  was an eye witness to these base transact ions, and under the solemnities of an oath  to put a stop to them, so were all the  civil authorities of the country, yet, every  man of them, regardless of their oaths, either  took an active part in aiding this banditta  banditta of ruffians <band>, or else winked at their  doings. The opperations of this mob,  took place <was> from the first of May, till the  last of August 1836. From three to four  months. They did a great deal of mischief  were the <was> were <the> cause of many deaths; many  persons were beaten most inhumanly,  much property was also distroyed. Families  that were moving into the country, were stopped;  many of them driven back, and comp[e]lled to  live in their wagons, untill houses could  be obtained; and when obtained, they were in  sickly places; the consequence was that many,  not only sickened, but died.
In , it was the  same as in , the authorities refused  to interfere, and let the mob range uncon troled, and Commit all the outrages  they pleased, and so far from any punishment  they were honored, and cherised for it, and that,  by the , the judges and justices of  the peace; many of whom, were leaders in  it. An attempt was made to  p[r]osecute two men; one <was> by the name of Hayden, [p. 7[a]]
. the circuit Judge was an eye witness to these base transactions, and under the solemnities of an oath to put a stop to them, so were all the civil authorities of the country, yet, every man of them, regardless of their oaths, either took an active part in aiding this band, or else winked at their doings. The opperations of this mob, was from the first of May, till the last of August 1836. From three to four months. They did a great deal of mischief were the cause of many deaths; many persons were beaten most inhumanly, much property was also distroyed. Families that were moving into the country, were stopped; many of them driven back, and compelled to live in their wagons, untill houses could be obtained; and when obtained, they were in sickly places; the consequence was that many, not only sickened, but died.
In , it was the same as in , the authorities refused to interfere, and let the mob range uncontroled, and Commit all the outrages they pleased, and so far from any punishment they were honored, and cherised for it, and that, by the , the judges and justices of the peace; many of whom, were leaders in it. An attempt was made to prosecute two men; one was by the name of Hayden, [p. 7[a]]
Page 7[a]