Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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to excite the jelousies of the surrounding counties, —for nothing can so much excite, the jelousies of that  people, so much nor awaken there indignation so  much, as to have an inteligent, an industiou  industrious, and enterprising people, am settle any  where in the state where they live— Threatnings  were again heard from , , Clinton, Platt, and   counties, that they were agoing to raise  another mob, and come and drive the citizens  out of .
The emigration was so rapid, and so  great, that in the space of eighteen months  after the first settlement in , that  there was not room for the people in that  , and they were under the necessity  of seeking habitations some where else, and  a number went into , which  was north of . Soon after the settle ments began in , a mob made  its apperance, forbiding them to settle there under  pain of death. However, this was not reguarded,  and the settlements, which were made in  different parts of the <,> were increasing daily, untill  one or two whole townships were entered, besides  large bodies of land, entered in other parts of  the . In such parts of the as  was in market; besides a large number of  improvements weere bought, under the expecta tion of getting preemption rights. The mob  spirit which first made its appearence in  , for a season seemed to sleep,  and there was no hinderence offered to the  settlements, which were increasing very fast.  All parties remained quiet, many of those who  had been engaged in the first mob came  in , came forward, and and made  confess[ion] of their rongs <wrongs> and all <all> as far as  was concerned was peace; But , , Clinton,  and Platt, kept up a continual threatning, untill [p. [8[b]]]
to excite the jelousies of the surrounding counties,—for nothing can so much excite, the jelousies of that people, nor awaken there indignation , as to have an inteligent, industrious, and enterprising people, settle any where in the state where they live— Threatnings were again heard from , , Clinton, Platt, and counties, that they were going to raise another mob, and come and drive the citizens out of .
The emigration was so rapid, and so great, that in the space of eighteen months after the first settlement in , that there was not room for the people in that , and they were under the necessity of seeking habitations some where else, and a number went into , which was north of . Soon after the settlements began in , a mob made its apperance, forbiding them to settle there under pain of death. However, this was not reguarded, and the settlements, which were made in different parts of the , were increasing daily, untill one or two whole townships were entered, besides large bodies of land, entered in other parts of the . In such parts of the as was in market; besides a large number of improvements weere bought, under the expectation of getting preemption rights. The mob spirit which first made its appearence in , for a season seemed to sleep, and there was no hinderence offered to the settlements, which were increasing very fast. All parties remained quiet, many of those who had been engaged in the first mob in , came forward, and made confession of their wrongs and all as far as was concerned was peace; But , , Clinton, and Platt, kept up a continual threatning, [p. [8[b]]]
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