Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 9[a]
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until it could not be born any any longer, and the saints openly declared, that it should cease; for they would suffer it no longer. No person should come into the streets of “[”] as they had been accustomed to do, and there threaten the peeple with mobs. This had the desired effect, it ceased, and no persons ventured to so do so any more. But the before mentioned counties, keep kept up a continual threatning, at home, whenever they saw any of the people of .
This order of things, countinued without any violence untill the election, which took place in <the> August follo this was 1838. The saints had been in , from the August of ’36, making two years. Threatnings were making that they should not vote at the election. Not only was it threatned that they should not vote in , but there were insinuations thrown out that there would be a mob in to prevent the people there from voting. There were no great fears however entertained, that any attempt of the kind would be made. The election at last came on, and the saints an went to discharge, what they considered, not only a high duty but priveledge, but a duty also. One of the candidates for representative in , was by the name of , [p. 9[a]]
until it could not be born any longer, and the saints openly declared, that it should cease; for they would suffer it no longer. No person should come into the streets of “[”] as they had been accustomed to do, and there threaten the peeple with mobs. This had the desired effect, it ceased, and no persons ventured to do so any more. But the before mentioned counties, kept up a continual threatning, at home, whenever they saw any of the people of .
This order of things, countinued without any violence untill the election, which took place in August this was 1838. The saints had been in , from the August of ’36, making two years. Threatnings were making that they should not vote at the election. Not only was it threatned that they should not vote in , but there were insinuations thrown out that there would be a mob in to prevent the people there from voting. There were no great fears however entertained, that any attempt of the kind would be made. The election at last came on, and the saints went to discharge, what they considered, not only a priveledge, but a duty also. One of the candidates for representative in , was by the name of , [p. 9[a]]
Page 9[a]