Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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three days they should all be driven out, and their property taken as spoil. It was reported, and that by themselves too, that there was a large mob gathering at Millport, a small village in , and that , formerly a justice of the peace, and had at the election been elected one of the judges, was at the head of it. It was thought best, seeing he was a piece officer, to go and inquire into the affair. This said , had a short time before this, sold his possessions, to one of the saints, an by the name of , and had received two hundred dollars as part of the payment. A committee was appointed, consisting of five or six persons, the names of three of them were, , , and , the names of the others not recolected recolected. They They accordingly went received them unfriendly, looked <on> their visit on in hig as a high insult, and refused to give any sattisfaction. This tended to confirm the report that he was head of a mob, it created some uneasiness. Quite a number of persons went through the course of the day, to a sp[r]ing of watter which, was near his house, to drink and also to get water for their horses. Dr and a number of others went into his house, and again interogated him respecting the mob. and some angry words passed between them. sent for Jo Mr Joseph Smith Jun who was at the sp[r]ing, to come into the house, accordingly he came in. The matter was talked of over. denied having any thing to do with a mob, and said he never would have and that as a peace officer, he felt himself bound <as much of> to do justice to the saints as to other citizens, and he would do it. Mr Smith then [p. 13[a]]
three days they should all be driven out, and their property taken as spoil. It was reported, and that by themselves too, that there was a large mob gathering at Millport, a small village in , and that , formerly a justice of the peace, and had at the election been elected one of the judges, was at the head of it. It was thought best, seeing he was a piece officer, to go and inquire into the affair. This said , had a short time before this, sold his possessions, to one of the saints, by the name of , and had received two hundred dollars as part of the payment. A committee was appointed, consisting of five or six persons, the names of three of them were, , , and , the names of the others not recolected. They accordingly went received them unfriendly, looked on their visit as a high insult, and refused to give any sattisfaction. This tended to confirm the report that he was head of a mob, it created some uneasiness. Quite a number of persons went through the course of the day, to a spring of watter which, was near his house, to drink and also to get water for their horses. Dr and a number of others went into his house, and again interogated him respecting the mob. and some angry words passed between them. sent for Mr Joseph Smith Jun who was at the spring, to come into the house, accordingly he came in. The matter was talked over. denied having any thing to do with a mob, and said he never would have and that as a peace officer, he felt himself bound as much of to do justice to the saints as to other citizens, and he would do it. Mr Smith then [p. 13[a]]
Page 13[a]