Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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cattle, corn, &c to feed their army. Cattle, horses, and grain, was taken with a liberal hand, and they publickly boasted, that they lived on mormon beef, and Mormon corn. The saints dare not leave their homes. for if they did, they were stopped on the way, they were shot at their their horses taken from them, and to all appearance, they soon would be ruined. All the time the mob had their runners, telling that their wives and children were driven from their homes, that their fences were thrown down, and the Mormons were distroying all they had. Their wives and children were either in their camp, or else sent off to some of their friends in the adjoining counties. And all this they pretended was through fear. But <to> certain of their friends, they said, their object in so doing, was to keep the publick ignorant of their real design; for they did not wish their women and children there, when they drove the Mormons out, lest they might get hurt.”
The saints were, all the time, making application to the authorities of the country, to put down the mob, messengers after messengers, were sent to the military officers, and to the judge of the court, to get them to send to the if necessary, and put an end to the ravages of this banditta and after much exertion, and much labor, at last the judge ordered out the militia. was ordered as the commander in cheif, being a major general. Brigadier generals, and , were both ordered out with their brigades. They put [p. [17[b]]]
cattle, corn, &c to feed their army. Cattle, horses, and grain, was taken with a liberal hand, and they publickly boasted, that they lived on mormon beef, and Mormon corn. The saints dare not leave their homes. for if they did, they were stopped on the way, they were shot at their horses taken from them, and to all appearance, they soon would be ruined. All the time the mob had their runners, telling that their wives and children were driven from their homes, that their fences were thrown down, and the Mormons were distroying all they had. Their wives and children were either in their camp, or else sent off to some of their friends in the adjoining counties. And all this they pretended was through fear. But to certain of their friends, they said, their object in so doing, was to keep the publick ignorant of their real design; for they did not wish their women and children there, when they drove the Mormons out, lest they might get hurt.”
The saints were, all the time, making application to the authorities of the country, to put down the mob, messengers after messengers, were sent to the military officers, and to the judge of the court, to get them to send to the if necessary, and put an end to the ravages of this banditta and after much exertion, and much labor, at last the judge ordered out the militia. was ordered as the commander in cheif, being a major general. Brigadier generals, and , were both ordered out with their brigades. They put [p. [17[b]]]
Page [17[b]]