Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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These things tra[n]spired, between the first of  July and the middle of November 1833.
The mob made their attack, by tearing  down houses and distroying property. A  was torn down, the press broken, the type scattered through  the streets; all the book work, papers, and other materials  that were in the office were distroyed; in all amounting  to several thousand dollars. A store was broken open,  the goods thrown into the street and trampled under foot,  * A prosecution was entered the against one of the men, who  was taken in the very act of taking the goods and trampli ng them underfoot. The writ was obtained at the office  of a man by the name of , who was a justice of the  peace, or called so. When the man was brought for trial,  though it was proven that he was taken in the very  act of distroying the goods, he was acquitted, and no  cause of action was found; but shortly afterwards, there  was a writ issued from the same office, against those who  prosecuted the said , for distroying the goods,  and they were for fals imprisonment, and they were holden  to bail for their appearance at the county court, and  for want of bail, they were thrown into jail. This is  a correct sample of the way the laws were administe red in .
Before this banditta commenced the dis truction of property, they appointed committees to  go and wait on the saints, and order them out of  the under pain of death. The object of those  warnings were <was,> to make them go and leave all their  property as prey to the mob. At which all the authorities  of , from the down, winked, as will  appear hereafter. While those committies were threatning  the saints with death, if they did not leave the  forthwith, and leave all their property as a prey to  them, they kept the publick papers teaming with  lies, and they found <many in the country> a large majority of all the reli geous papers in the country, and a great number of  the political ones, ready to aid them in their abo mination, by giving f ready circulations to their lies  and slanders. This I I must say, to the shame [p. 2[a]]
These things transpired, between the first of July and the middle of November 1833.
The mob made their attack, by tearing down houses and distroying property. A was torn down, the press broken, the type scattered through the streets; all the book work, papers, and other materials that were in the office were distroyed; in all amounting to several thousand dollars. A store was broken open, the goods thrown into the street and trampled under foot, * A prosecution was entered against one of the men, who was taken in the very act of taking the goods and trampling them underfoot. The writ was obtained at the office of a man by the name of , who was a justice of the peace, or called so. When the man was brought for trial, though it was proven that he was taken in the very act of distroying the goods, he was acquitted, and no cause of action was found; but shortly afterwards, there was a writ issued from the same office, against those who prosecuted the said , for distroying the goods, for fals imprisonment, and they were holden to bail for their appearance at the county court, and for want of bail, they were thrown into jail. This is a correct sample of the way the laws were administered in .
Before this banditta commenced the distruction of property, they appointed committees to go and wait on the saints, and order them out of the under pain of death. The object of those warnings was, to make them go and leave all their property as prey to the mob. At which all the authorities of , from the down, winked, as will appear hereafter. While those committies were threatning the saints with death, if they did not leave the forthwith, and leave all their property as a prey to them, they kept the publick papers teaming with lies, and they found many in the country , ready to aid them in their abomination, by giving circulations to their lies and slanders. This I must say, to the shame [p. 2[a]]
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