Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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and disgrace of the editors, who have devoted their papers to so foul a business. The scheme of lying so readily supported by the religeious papers of the country, generally, was invented for the purpose of plundering, robbing, stealing, and driving a people from their homes, and taking their property, as <a> prey, to the free booters who were ready to seize upon, <it> when the religeious <publick> papers of the country, had sufficeintly aided them, to a enable them to obtain their object, without being punished fer it. In this scheme of lying, no pen figured more than that of the Revd , the before mentioned baptist missionary, who has proved himself to be the abettor of thi[e]ves, robbers, and plunderers. Also the Revd E. G. Lovejoy was an assistant in this foul <vile> business; but he has received his reward, a mob has since sent him to his grave. A just punishment for his having aided a mob, to murder and plunder others; but still, the mob is now the less guilty for this that.
After the mob had gotten all things sufficiently prepared, and the publick mind, as they supposed, completely blinded, having been so well assisted by the publick prints of the day, they commenced their opperations in earnest, in every part of the . Tering down houses, houses drging men out of there houses and whipping men were dra[g]ged out, and whipped in the most shocking manner, without regard to age: of this number were four revolutionary soldiers, over the age of seventy years, who had offered there lives for the liberty that their oppressors were enjoying; but they now, with sorrow, beheld the liberty for which they faught, torn from from them, by the violence of those who were enjoying freedom, at the expence of their blood and treasure. Widows also from sixty to eighty years of age, whose husband were among the number of the revolutionary patriots, were driven violently from there houses, in that inclement season, by this ruthless banditta of wretches, worse than savages, and their properity made common plunder, to gratafy their rapacity: and those females at that advanced age and in an inclement season [p. [2[b]]]
and disgrace of the editors, who have devoted their papers to so foul a business. The scheme of lying so readily supported by the papers of the country, generally, was invented for the purpose of plundering, robbing, stealing, and driving a people from their homes, and taking their property, as a prey, to the free booters who were ready to seize upon, it when the publick papers , had sufficeintly aided them, to enable them to obtain their object, without being punished fer it.
After the mob had gotten all things sufficiently prepared, and the publick mind, as they supposed, completely blinded, having been so well assisted by the publick prints of the day, they commenced their opperations in earnest, in every part of the . Tering down houses, men were dragged out, and whipped in the most shocking manner, without regard to age: of this number were four revolutionary soldiers, over the age of seventy years, who had offered there lives for the liberty that their oppressors were enjoying; but they now, with sorrow, beheld the liberty for which they faught, torn from them, by the violence of those who were enjoying freedom, at the expence of their blood and treasure. Widows also from sixty to eighty years of age, whose husband were among the number of the revolutionary patriots, were driven violently from there houses, in that inclement season, by this ruthless banditta of wretches, worse than savages, and their properity made common plunder, to gratafy their [p. [2[b]]]
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