Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [38[c]]
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while others were engaged in gathering in their crop  for the winter consumption. The weather was very  pleasant; the sun shone clear; all was tranquil. and  no one expressed any apprehensions of the awful  crisis that was near us even at our doors
It was about four o’clock, while sitting in my cabbin  with my babe in my arms, and my standing  <att> by my side the door being open I cast my eyes  on the opposite <bank> of , and saw a large  company of armed men on horses directing their  course towards the mills with all possible speed  As they anvanced through the scattering trees  that stood on the edge of the prairie, they  seem’d to form themselves into a three square po sition forming a vanguard in front. At this mo ment David Evans, seeing the superiority  of their numbers, (there being two hundred and  forty of them: according to their own account) swung  his hat and cried for peace. This not being  heeded they continued to advance and their leader  <> fired a gun, which was followed, by a solemn pause  of ten or twelve seconds, when all at once they  discharged about one hundred rifles aiming at  a blacksmiths shop into which our friends had  fled for safety, and charging up to the shop the  cracks of which between the logs were sufficently  large to enable them to aim directly at the bodies  of those who had there fled for refuge from the  fire of their murderers
There were several families tented in rear of the  shop. whos lives were exposed, and amidst a shower  of bullets fled to the woods in different directions  After standing and gazing on this bloody scene for  a few minutes and finding myself in the utmost  danger. the bullets having reached the house where  I was living. I committed my family to the protection  of Heaven & leaving the house on the opposite side I  took a path which led up the hill follo[w]ing in the trail  of three of my brethren that had fled from the shop [p. [38[c]]]
while others were engaged in gathering in their crop for the winter consumption. The weather was very pleasant; the sun shone clear; all was tranquil. and no one expressed any apprehensions of the awful crisis that was near us even at our doors
It was about four o’clock, while sitting in my cabbin with my babe in my arms, and my standing by my side the door being open I cast my eyes on the opposite bank of , and saw a large company of armed men on horses directing their course towards the mills with all possible speed As they anvanced through the scattering trees that stood on the edge of the prairie, they seem’d to form themselves into a three square position forming a vanguard in front. At this moment David Evans, seeing the superiority of their numbers, (there being two hundred and forty of them: according to their own account) swung his hat and cried for peace. This not being heeded they continued to advance and their leader fired a gun, which was followed, by a solemn pause of ten or twelve seconds, when all at once they discharged about one hundred rifles aiming at a blacksmiths shop into which our friends had fled for safety, and charging up to the shop the cracks of which between the logs were sufficently large to enable them to aim directly at the bodies of those who had there fled for refuge from the fire of their murderers
There were several families tented in rear of the shop. whos lives were exposed, and amidst a shower of bullets fled to the woods in different directions After standing and gazing on this bloody scene for a few minutes and finding myself in the utmost danger. the bullets having reached the house where I was living. I committed my family to the protection of Heaven & leaving the house on the opposite side I took a path which led up the hill following in the trail of three of my brethren that had fled from the shop [p. [38[c]]]
Page [38[c]]