Times and Seasons, 1 July 1842

  • Source Note
Page 842
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documents concerning the matter in my possession, but I think that to say further is unnecessary, as the subject is so plain that no one can mistake the true nature of the case.
I remain yours, respectfully,
JOSEPH SMITH.
, June 23, 1842.
——
The following extracts from letters received by gentlemen in this city from their correspondents in relation to , will corroborate with the above statements and testimony:
——
Urbana, Ill., June 1842.
* * * * “As to my knowledge of , I can safely say that he is unworthy of the confidence of all mankind; in my opinion, he is an infamous rascal, and I am well acquainted with him.” * * *
——
Montecello, Platt Co., Ill., June 3, 1842.
* * * * “You inquire of me about . * * * That without any creditable way of getting a living, and without any apparent income, he handles more money than any common person.
“That he pretended to have a commission as Surgeon in the army, but had not.
“That he had united with persons unknown, and non-resident in that state, to filch money from the unwary, by getting up a plat of a town on a scale of 800 acres, as the capital of , when it was about to become a state; and thereby procure from thoughtless persons money to locate such a town, and pay in town lots—without any even remote supposable idea of ever locating such a town.
‘That he had in like manner attempted to palm himself upon the Legislature of , by trying to get a charter for a College in that state, but the Legislature detected him, and recorded him on the journals as an impostor, and Mr. Bailhache, editor of the “ State Journal,” published it as far as the paper was read.”
——
McConnelsville, Morgan Co. O.)
March 2, 1841.)
Dear Sir— By your request I have made inquiries into the history of , and am enabled to give you the following facts which may be relied on as correct.
“When a young man his character stood fair, he studied medicine with his uncle, Dr. Samuel P. Hildreth, of Marietta, Washington county, O. It is believed he has a diploma, and also recommendations from some of the principal Physicians of that place; he started out with fair prospects, and married a daughter of Col. Joseph Barker, near Marietta. and his wife united with the Methodist Church, and he became a local preacher. It was soon manifest that he was a superficial character, always uneasy, and moved from place to place; at different times lived in Barnesville, Maconnelsville, Malta, Wheeling, Va., Colesville, Pennsylvania and Indiana; it is not presumed that less than twenty towns has been his place of residence at different times; he has the vanity to believe he is the smartest man in the nation; and if he cannot at once be placed at the head of the heap, he soon seeks a situation; he is always ready to fall in with whatever is popular; by the use of his recommendations he has been able to push himself into places and situations entirely beyond his abilities; he has been a prominent personage in and about colleges and universities, but had soon vanished; and the next thing his friends hear of him he is off in some other direction; at one time he was a prominet Campbellite preacher.
“During many years his poor, but confiding wife, followed him from place to place, with no suspicion of his unfaithfulness to her; at length however, he became so bold in his departures, that it was evident to all around that he was a sore offender, and his wife left him under satisfactory evidence of his adulterous connections; nor was this his only fault; he used her bad otherwise. Mrs. [Mary Ann Barker] Bennett now lives with her father; has two children living, and has buried one or two. has three brothers-in-law living in this place, who, if they were disposed, could give all the particulars; but I dislike to urge them; I did apply to one which I thought the most likely, but he seemed reluctant to give it; but referred me to the person who has given me the foregoing; but he not being a connexion, has not been particular in following him in all his perigrinations; but is, no doubt correct, so far as given;—it has been ’s wish that his wife should get a bill of divorcement, but as yet she has not; nor does my informant know that she contemplates doing so;—in fine, he is an imposter, and unworthy of the confidence of all good men.” * *
Through motives of delicacy, we withhold the names of our informants, and other correspondents; but hold ourselves in readiness, at all times, to substantiate by abundant testimony, all that has been asserted, if required, as the documents are all on hand.
.
 
————
NOTICE.
To all whom it may concern, Greeting.—
Whereas , in the organization of the Lodge, under dispensation [p. 842]
documents concerning the matter in my possession, but I think that to say further is unnecessary, as the subject is so plain that no one can mistake the true nature of the case.
I remain yours, respectfully,
JOSEPH SMITH.
, June 23, 1842.
——
The following extracts from letters received by gentlemen in this city from their correspondents in relation to , will corroborate with the above statements and testimony:
——
Urbana, Ill., June 1842.
* * * * “As to my knowledge of , I can safely say that he is unworthy of the confidence of all mankind; in my opinion, he is an infamous rascal, and I am well acquainted with him.” * * *
——
Montecello, Platt Co., Ill., June 3, 1842.
* * * * “You inquire of me about . * * * That without any creditable way of getting a living, and without any apparent income, he handles more money than any common person.
“That he pretended to have a commission as Surgeon in the army, but had not.
“That he had united with persons unknown, and non-resident in that state, to filch money from the unwary, by getting up a plat of a town on a scale of 800 acres, as the capital of , when it was about to become a state; and thereby procure from thoughtless persons money to locate such a town, and pay in town lots—without any even remote supposable idea of ever locating such a town.
‘That he had in like manner attempted to palm himself upon the Legislature of , by trying to get a charter for a College in that state, but the Legislature detected him, and recorded him on the journals as an impostor, and Mr. Bailhache, editor of the “ State Journal,” published it as far as the paper was read.”
——
McConnelsville, Morgan Co. O.)
March 2, 1841.)
Dear Sir— By your request I have made inquiries into the history of , and am enabled to give you the following facts which may be relied on as correct.
“When a young man his character stood fair, he studied medicine with his uncle, Dr. Samuel P. Hildreth, of Marietta, Washington county, O. It is believed he has a diploma, and also recommendations from some of the principal Physicians of that place; he started out with fair prospects, and married a daughter of Col. Joseph Barker, near Marietta. and his wife united with the Methodist Church, and he became a local preacher. It was soon manifest that he was a superficial character, always uneasy, and moved from place to place; at different times lived in Barnesville, Maconnelsville, Malta, Wheeling, Va., Colesville, Pennsylvania and Indiana; it is not presumed that less than twenty towns has been his place of residence at different times; he has the vanity to believe he is the smartest man in the nation; and if he cannot at once be placed at the head of the heap, he soon seeks a situation; he is always ready to fall in with whatever is popular; by the use of his recommendations he has been able to push himself into places and situations entirely beyond his abilities; he has been a prominent personage in and about colleges and universities, but had soon vanished; and the next thing his friends hear of him he is off in some other direction; at one time he was a prominet Campbellite preacher.
“During many years his poor, but confiding wife, followed him from place to place, with no suspicion of his unfaithfulness to her; at length however, he became so bold in his departures, that it was evident to all around that he was a sore offender, and his wife left him under satisfactory evidence of his adulterous connections; nor was this his only fault; he used her bad otherwise. Mrs. [Mary Ann Barker] Bennett now lives with her father; has two children living, and has buried one or two. has three brothers-in-law living in this place, who, if they were disposed, could give all the particulars; but I dislike to urge them; I did apply to one which I thought the most likely, but he seemed reluctant to give it; but referred me to the person who has given me the foregoing; but he not being a connexion, has not been particular in following him in all his perigrinations; but is, no doubt correct, so far as given;—it has been ’s wish that his wife should get a bill of divorcement, but as yet she has not; nor does my informant know that she contemplates doing so;—in fine, he is an imposter, and unworthy of the confidence of all good men.” * *
Through motives of delicacy, we withhold the names of our informants, and other correspondents; but hold ourselves in readiness, at all times, to substantiate by abundant testimony, all that has been asserted, if required, as the documents are all on hand.
.
 
————
NOTICE.
To all whom it may concern, Greeting.—
Whereas , in the organization of the Lodge, under dispensation [p. 842]
Page 842