30479

Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson County, Missouri, 2 July 1833

in these last days as we are not willing to Idle any time which can be spent to useful purpose doors are opening continually for proclaiming the spirit of bitterness among the people is fast subsiding and a spirit of enquiry is taking its place I proclaimed last Sunday at Chardon

Located eight miles south of Lake Erie and immediately east of Kirtland Township. Settled by 1812. Included village of Chardon. Population of township in 1820 about 430; in 1830 about 880; and in 1840 about 1,100. Two of JS’s sisters resided in township. ...

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our county seat I had the court house, there was a general turn out, good attention and a pressing invitation for more meetings which will be granted if the Lord will when we return from this tower tour, Bro Joseph is going to take a tower tour with Bro George James

28 Oct. 1796–30 Oct. 1864. Farmer. Born in Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Stephen James and Hannah Schofield. Moved to Brownhelm, Huron Co., Ohio, ca. July 1817. Married Caroline Weed, 28 June 1822, in Huron Co. Baptized into LDS church...

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of Brownhelm as soon as he (George

28 Oct. 1796–30 Oct. 1864. Farmer. Born in Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Stephen James and Hannah Schofield. Moved to Brownhelm, Huron Co., Ohio, ca. July 1817. Married Caroline Weed, 28 June 1822, in Huron Co. Baptized into LDS church...

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) comes to this place,10

Brownhelm Township is approximately fifty miles southwest of Kirtland in Lorain County, Ohio, near the shore of Lake Erie. A 7 May 1833 letter was addressed to James specifically, though it was intended for “all the Brothers & sisters” of Brownhelm generally, suggesting that James held a leadership position in the church there. James apparently did not serve his planned mission with JS. He explained to a council of high priests on 4 April 1834 that he failed to “magnify his calling” and that he should have told JS earlier “that his pecuniary affairs called his attention at home which prevented his fulfilling the promise he made to Bro. Joseph in going out to proclaim the Gospel.” (Emer Harris, Springville, PA, to “Dearly Beloved Brethern,” Brownhelm, OH, 7 May 1833, Harris Family Papers, BYU; Minute Book 1, 4 Apr. 1834.)  


we hope our brethren that the greatest freedom and frankness will exist between you and the Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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not withholding from each other any information from us but communicate with the greatest freedom lest you should produce evils of a serious character and the Lord becomes offended11

In a postscript to a previous letter, Orson Hyde, clerk for the presidency of the high priesthood, wrote: “There should exist the greatest freedom and familiarity among the Rulers in Zion. . . . When we direct letters to Zion to any of the High Priests which pertains to the regulation thereof, we always design that they Should be laid before the Bishop so as to enable him to perform his duty.” (Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 25 June 1833; see also Letter to Edward Partridge, 2 May 1833; and Historical Introduction to Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 21 Apr. 1833.)  


for know assuredly if we by our wickedness bring evil on our own heads the Lord will let us bear it till we get weary and hate eniquity Bro Frederick

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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wants you to say to Bro John Burk

4 Feb. 1793–8 June 1853. Innkeeper, farmer. Born in Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Charles Burke and Esther Robinson Bohannon. Married first Abigail Fellows, 13 Mar. 1821, in Fairfield. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1823. Baptized into...

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that the man from whom he expected to get the mill stones has run off so he will not be able to get them but Brother Burk

4 Feb. 1793–8 June 1853. Innkeeper, farmer. Born in Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Charles Burke and Esther Robinson Bohannon. Married first Abigail Fellows, 13 Mar. 1821, in Fairfield. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1823. Baptized into...

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can get them at St Louis

Located on west side of Mississippi River about fifteen miles south of confluence with Missouri River. Founded as fur-trading post by French settlers, 1764. Incorporated as town, 1809. First Mississippi steamboat docked by town, 1817. Incorporated as city...

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of the same mans make
We conclude by giving our heartiest approbation to evry measure calculated for the spread of the truth in these last days and our strongest desires and sincerest prayers for the prosperity [p. 53]
in these last days as we are not willing to Idle  any time which can be spent to useful purpose  doors are opening continually for proclaiming  the spirit of bitterness among the people is  fast subsiding and a spirit of enquiry  is taking its place I proclaimed last  Sunday at Chardon

Located eight miles south of Lake Erie and immediately east of Kirtland Township. Settled by 1812. Included village of Chardon. Population of township in 1820 about 430; in 1830 about 880; and in 1840 about 1,100. Two of JS’s sisters resided in township. ...

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our county seat [I]  had the court house, there was a general  turn out, good attention and a pressing  invitation for more meetings which will be  granted if the Lord will when we return  from this tower [tour], Bro Joseph is going to  take a tower [tour] with Bro George James

28 Oct. 1796–30 Oct. 1864. Farmer. Born in Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Stephen James and Hannah Schofield. Moved to Brownhelm, Huron Co., Ohio, ca. July 1817. Married Caroline Weed, 28 June 1822, in Huron Co. Baptized into LDS church...

View Full Bio
of  Brownhelm as soon as he (George

28 Oct. 1796–30 Oct. 1864. Farmer. Born in Stockbridge, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Stephen James and Hannah Schofield. Moved to Brownhelm, Huron Co., Ohio, ca. July 1817. Married Caroline Weed, 28 June 1822, in Huron Co. Baptized into LDS church...

View Full Bio
) comes  to this place,10

Brownhelm Township is approximately fifty miles southwest of Kirtland in Lorain County, Ohio, near the shore of Lake Erie. A 7 May 1833 letter was addressed to James specifically, though it was intended for “all the Brothers & sisters” of Brownhelm generally, suggesting that James held a leadership position in the church there. James apparently did not serve his planned mission with JS. He explained to a council of high priests on 4 April 1834 that he failed to “magnify his calling” and that he should have told JS earlier “that his pecuniary affairs called his attention at home which prevented his fulfilling the promise he made to Bro. Joseph in going out to proclaim the Gospel.” (Emer Harris, Springville, PA, to “Dearly Beloved Brethern,” Brownhelm, OH, 7 May 1833, Harris Family Papers, BYU; Minute Book 1, 4 Apr. 1834.)  


we hope our brethren  that the greatest freedom and frankness  will exist between you and the Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
 not withholding from each other any information  from us but communicate with the greatest  freedom lest you should produce evils  of a serious nature character and the  Lord becomes offended11

In a postscript to a previous letter, Orson Hyde, clerk for the presidency of the high priesthood, wrote: “There should exist the greatest freedom and familiarity among the Rulers in Zion. . . . When we direct letters to Zion to any of the High Priests which pertains to the regulation thereof, we always design that they Should be laid before the Bishop so as to enable him to perform his duty.” (Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 25 June 1833; see also Letter to Edward Partridge, 2 May 1833; and Historical Introduction to Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 21 Apr. 1833.)  


for know assured ly if we by our wickedness bring evil  on our own heads the Lord will let us12

TEXT: Possibly “it us”.  


 bear it till we get weary and hate eniquity  Bro Frederick

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

View Full Bio
wants you to say to Bro  [John] Burk

4 Feb. 1793–8 June 1853. Innkeeper, farmer. Born in Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Charles Burke and Esther Robinson Bohannon. Married first Abigail Fellows, 13 Mar. 1821, in Fairfield. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1823. Baptized into...

View Full Bio
that the man from whom he exp ected to get the mill stones has run  off so he will not be able to get them  but Brother Burk

4 Feb. 1793–8 June 1853. Innkeeper, farmer. Born in Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Charles Burke and Esther Robinson Bohannon. Married first Abigail Fellows, 13 Mar. 1821, in Fairfield. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1823. Baptized into...

View Full Bio
can get them at  St Louis

Located on west side of Mississippi River about fifteen miles south of confluence with Missouri River. Founded as fur-trading post by French settlers, 1764. Incorporated as town, 1809. First Mississippi steamboat docked by town, 1817. Incorporated as city...

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of the same mans make
We conclude by giving  our heartiest approbation to evry measure  calculated for the spread of <the> truth in  these last days and our strongest desires  and sincerest prayers for the prosperity [p. 53]
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This letter was written in response to three letters, each dated 7 June 1833, that church leaders in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, received from Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, none of which have been located. The contents of this 2 July 1833 letter indicate that at least one of the letters from Missouri reported the safe arrival of Vienna Jaques

10 June 1787–7 Feb. 1884. Laundress, nurse. Born in Beverly, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Henry Jaques and Lucinda Hughes. Lived in Boston, 1827–1830. Baptized into LDS church by E. Harris, 12 July 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833....

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and William Hobert

Ca. 1813–Oct. 1833. Typographer. Directed to accompany recent LDS church convert Vienna Jaques from Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, to Jackson Co., Missouri, June 1833. Intended to work for The Evening and the Morning Star newspaper in Independence, Jackson Co...

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, who had been directed by a conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

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of high priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

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in Kirtland to travel together to Missouri.1

Minutes, 30 Apr. 1833. An 8 March 1833 revelation directed Jaques to move to Missouri. Hobert moved to Jackson County, Missouri, in order to work as a typographer in the church’s printing office there. (Revelation, 8 Mar. 1833 [D&C 90:28]; “Obituary,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833, 117.)  


The letter also suggests that at least one of the 7 June letters had inquired about the gift of tongues. In addition to addressing these topics, the letter from JS featured here included instructions for sending copies of the Book of Commandments—then being printed on the church’s press

JS revelations, dated 20 July and 1 Aug. 1831, directed establishment of LDS church’s first printing office in Independence, Missouri. Dedicated by Bishop Edward Partridge, 29 May 1832. Located on Lot 76, on Liberty Street just south of courthouse square....

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in Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, Missouri—to Kirtland and updated the Missouri church members on various developments in Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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, including the health of Kirtland church members, Kirtland leaders’ impending missionary journeys, and the news that JS had completed his translation of the Bible on the same day this 2 July 1833 letter was written. At one point in the letter, Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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makes a first-person reference to himself, and he was also the first signer of the letter, indicating that he likely served as the principal author. Nevertheless, most of the letter is written in the first-person plural.
It is unclear whether church members in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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ever received this letter. Depending on a variety of factors, letters sent between Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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and Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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could take anywhere from ten days to a month to deliver. If the letter was mailed as intended on 3 July, it could have arrived in Independence as early as 13 July. If it traveled more slowly, however, it may have been lost in the confusion attending the mob violence that took place on 20 and 23 July in Independence.

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