30494

Letter to Edward Partridge, 5 December 1833

was shed we agreed to go away immediately and the enemy took our guns,19

See Historical Introduction to Letter from William W. Phelps, 6–7 Nov. 1833; see also “From Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Jan. 1834, 125.  


Bro Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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also states that since the above was wrote (viz on the 6th)20 another horid scene has transpired, after our people surrendered their arms a party of the Mobe went above Blue

River rises in Indian Territory and flows northward into Missouri River in Jackson Co., Missouri. Mormon settlement established near river, Dec. 1831. Branch of LDS church established in area on opposite side of river from Kaw Township, by 1833; branch had...

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and began to whip and even murder and the brethren have been driven into the woods and fleeing to the ferry and also the Mob have hired the ferryman to carry them across the river and it was reported that the mob had Killed two more of the brethren
It appears brethren that the above statements were mostly from reports and no certainty of their being correct.21

At the time this letter was written, the information regarding these deaths and other events in Missouri had not been confirmed for JS. “We have heard various accounts of the number slain on both sides,” wrote Cowdery in the December 1833 issue of The Evening and the Morning Star, “and these reports have frequently been exagerated.” (“The Outrage in Jackson County, Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833, 119.)  


therefore it is difficult for us to advise and can only say that the destenies of all people are in the hands of a Just God and he will do no injustice to any one and this one thing is sure that they who will live Godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution22

See 2 Timothy 3:12.  


and before their robes are made white in the blood of the Lamb it is to be expected they will pass through great tribulation according to John the Revelator,23

See Revelation 7:14.  


I wish when you receive this letter that you would collect every particular concerning the Mob from the begining and send us a correct statement of fact as they transpired from time to time that we may be enabled to give the public correct information on the subject24

The same month that JS wrote this letter, The Evening and the Morning Star began to publish a series of articles titled “The Outrage in Jackson County, Missouri.” The first article in the series used letters from William W. Phelps and others to inform readers of the violent events in Missouri. Later articles provided updates and commentaries on the political situation in Missouri. (“The Outrage in Jackson County, Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833–June 1834, 118–123, 129, 137–139, 159–160, 167–168; Letter, 30 Oct. 1833; Letter from William W. Phelps, 6–7 Nov. 1833; Letter from William W. Phelps, 14 Nov. 1833; Letter from John Corrill, 17 Nov. 1833.)  


and inform us also of the situation of the brethren with respect to their means of sustinance &c25

Though he was unaware of JS’s request here, in a letter sent from Missouri the same month, John Corrill provided the information that JS sought. Corrill wrote, “Great sacrifices have been made: some being destitute of money, have sold their cattle and other effects at a very low rate. Much property that was left behind has been destroyed, and other property that yet remains probably will be before it can be taken care of. Some families are as it were entirely destitute, and must unavoidably suffer unless God interposes in their behalf.” (“From Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Jan. 1834, 126.)  


I would inform you that it is not the will of the Lord for you to sell your Lands in Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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if means can possably be procured for their sustenance [p. 67]
was shed we agreed to go away immediately  and the enemy took our guns,19

See Historical Introduction to Letter from William W. Phelps, 6–7 Nov. 1833; see also “From Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Jan. 1834, 125.  


Bro Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

View Full Bio
 also states that since the above was wrote (viz  on the 6th)20 another horid scene has transpired,  after our people surrendered their arms a  party of the Mobe went above Blue

River rises in Indian Territory and flows northward into Missouri River in Jackson Co., Missouri. Mormon settlement established near river, Dec. 1831. Branch of LDS church established in area on opposite side of river from Kaw Township, by 1833; branch had...

More Info
and  began to whip and even murder and the  brethren have been driven into the woods and  fleeing to the ferry and also the Mob have  hired the ferryman to carry them across  the river and it was reported that the  mob had Killed two more of the brethren
It appears brethren that the above statemen ts were mostly from reports and no certainty  of their being correct.21

At the time this letter was written, the information regarding these deaths and other events in Missouri had not been confirmed for JS. “We have heard various accounts of the number slain on both sides,” wrote Cowdery in the December 1833 issue of The Evening and the Morning Star, “and these reports have frequently been exagerated.” (“The Outrage in Jackson County, Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833, 119.)  


therefore it is difficult  for us to advise and can only say that the  destenies of all people are in the hands of a  Just God and he will do no injustice to  any one and this one thing is sure that  they who will live Godly in Christ Jesus shall  suffer persecution22

See 2 Timothy 3:12.  


and before their robes are  mad[e] white in the blood of the Lamb it  is to be expected they will pass through gre at tribulation according to John the  Revelator,23

See Revelation 7:14.  


I wish when you receive this  letter that you would collect every particular  concerning the Mob from the begining and  send us a correct statement of fact as they  transpired from time to time that we  may be enabled to give the public correct  information on the subject24

The same month that JS wrote this letter, The Evening and the Morning Star began to publish a series of articles titled “The Outrage in Jackson County, Missouri.” The first article in the series used letters from William W. Phelps and others to inform readers of the violent events in Missouri. Later articles provided updates and commentaries on the political situation in Missouri. (“The Outrage in Jackson County, Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833–June 1834, 118–123, 129, 137–139, 159–160, 167–168; Letter, 30 Oct. 1833; Letter from William W. Phelps, 6–7 Nov. 1833; Letter from William W. Phelps, 14 Nov. 1833; Letter from John Corrill, 17 Nov. 1833.)  


and inform us  also of the situation of the brethren with resp ect to their means of sustinance &c25

Though he was unaware of JS’s request here, in a letter sent from Missouri the same month, John Corrill provided the information that JS sought. Corrill wrote, “Great sacrifices have been made: some being destitute of money, have sold their cattle and other effects at a very low rate. Much property that was left behind has been destroyed, and other property that yet remains probably will be before it can be taken care of. Some families are as it were entirely destitute, and must unavoidably suffer unless God interposes in their behalf.” (“From Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Jan. 1834, 126.)  


I would  inform you that it is not the will of the Lord  for you to sell your Lands in Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
if means  can possably be procured for their sustenance [p. 67]
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JS, Letter, Kirtland Township

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Geauga Co., OH, to Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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, Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Clay Co., MO, 5 Dec. 1833. Retained copy, [ca. 5 Dec. 1833], in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 65–70; handwriting of Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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; JS Collection, CHL. For more complete source information, see the source note for JS Letterbook 1.

Facts