30494

Letter to Edward Partridge, 5 December 1833

and being prepared they poured a deadly fire upon them, two of their number fell dead on the ground and a number mortally wounded among the former was Breazel Hugh Breazele

Ca. 1803–4 Nov. 1833. Lawyer. Moved to Roane Co., Tennessee, by 1826. Married Amanda M. King, 15 Feb. 1827, in Roane Co. Traveled to Independence, Jackson Co., Missouri, to participate in Mormon War, possibly at urging of brother-in-law, Austin A. King. Killed...

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4

Hyde’s account focused entirely on the battle that ensued around the Big Blue settlement during the late evening of 4 November 1833. Other accounts also depict these events. (See [Edward Partridge], “A History, of the Persecution,” Times and Seasons, Jan. 1840, 1:33–35; see also Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 17–19; and Corrill, Brief History, 20.)  


Tuesday5

5 November 1833.  


morning there were a number of the Mob missing and could not be accounted for and while we was at Liberty landing

Principal commercial docking site for river steamboats and Everett’s Ferry. Located on north shore of Missouri River, about four miles south of county seat, Liberty. Established by 1830, replacing Allen’s Landing, which operated half mile west of this site...

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6

In 1833, Liberty landing was located on the north side of the Missouri River, approximately five miles south of Liberty in Clay County and due north of Independence. It was also known for a time as the Upper Liberty landing. (Parkin, “History of the Latter-day Saints in Clay County,” 39.)  


on wensday7

6 November 1833.  


a messenger rode up saying that he had Just came from the seat of war, and that the night before another battle was fought in which Mr Russell Hicks

Ca. 1805–19 Apr. 1876. Lawyer. Born in Massachusetts. Treasurer of Jackson Co., Missouri, 1827. Deputy clerk of Jackson Co. court, 1833. Permitted to practice law by Cass Co., Missouri, circuit court, 7 Dec. 1835. One of fourteen men who formed a company ...

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fell having three balls and some buck shot through his body and about twenty more shared a similar fate and also that one or two of our men were killed and as many wounded and he (Orson

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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) heard the cannonading distinctly8

No armed engagement took place in Jackson County on Tuesday, 5 November 1833. Church leaders decided to leave the county during the early morning hours of that day and surrendered their arms later in the afternoon. “I am happy to state,” Hyde later wrote, by way of correcting his earlier letter, “that I now believe that the report concerning the last engagement was without foundation.” Moreover, the cannonading he heard while on board the steamboat “was only an expression of the triumph and joy of the mob.” (“From Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Jan. 1834, 124–126; [Edward Partridge], “A History, of the Persecution,” Times and Seasons, Jan. 1840, 1:34–35; Orson Hyde, Letter to the Editor, The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833, 120, italics in original.)  


and also stated that the man who broke open the store

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, directed A. Sidney Gilbert, Newel K. Whitney’s Ohio business partner, to establish store in Independence. Gilbert first purchased vacated log courthouse, located on lot 59 at intersection of Lynn and Lexington Streets, to...

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took Sidney Gilbert

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

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Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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, and one more for fals imprisonment and put them in prison and as near as he could Learn never to let them escape alive9

Orson Hyde, Letter to the Editor, The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833, 120; see also Letter from William W. Phelps, 6–7 Nov. 1833; Letter from John Corrill, 17 Nov. 1833; and “From Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Jan. 1834, 124–126.  


This statement of bro Orson

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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is some what different from that of bro Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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who states that on friday10

1 November 1833.  


night the brethren had mustered about 40 or 50 men armed and marched into the village took one prisoner and fired one gun11

The details that JS summarized here were omitted from the published, and only extant, version of Phelps’s 6–7 November 1833 letter. (See Letter from William W. Phelps, 6–7 Nov. 1833.)  


and satturday12

2 November 1833.  


fell upon our brethren above Blue

River rises in Indian Territory and flows northward into Missouri River in Jackson Co., Missouri. Mormon settlement established near river, Dec. 1831. Branch of LDS church established in area on opposite side of river from Kaw Township, by 1833; branch had...

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, and one of George Manship sons mortally wounded.13

A mob attacked a settlement of church members near the Blue River, located approximately eight miles southwest of Independence, on Saturday, 2 November. One of the attackers of the settlement, a young man named Manship, was shot during the skirmish and may have died as a result of the attack.  


On monday14

4 November 1833.  


about sun set a regular action was fought near Christian Whitmer

18 Jan. 1798–27 Nov. 1835. Shoemaker. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Married Anna (Anne) Schott, 22 Feb. 1825, at Seneca Co., New York. Ensign in New York militia, 1825. Constable of Fayette, Seneca Co., 1828–1829. Member...

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s under the command of bro D we had four wounded, they had five wounded and two killed viz Linvil Thomas Linville and Breaseal

Ca. 1803–4 Nov. 1833. Lawyer. Moved to Roane Co., Tennessee, by 1826. Married Amanda M. King, 15 Feb. 1827, in Roane Co. Traveled to Independence, Jackson Co., Missouri, to participate in Mormon War, possibly at urging of brother-in-law, Austin A. King. Killed...

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.15 From friday till tuesday16

1–5 November 1833.  


our brethren were under arms 150 of our brethren came forth Like Moroni to battle,17

See Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 340–407 [Alma chaps. 43–63].  


on tuesday18

5 November 1833.  


morning the mob had 300 and before any blood [p. 66]
and being prepared <they> poured a dreadful  deadly fire upon them, two of their number  fell dead on the ground and a number  mortally wounded among the former was Breazel [Hugh Breazele]

Ca. 1803–4 Nov. 1833. Lawyer. Moved to Roane Co., Tennessee, by 1826. Married Amanda M. King, 15 Feb. 1827, in Roane Co. Traveled to Independence, Jackson Co., Missouri, to participate in Mormon War, possibly at urging of brother-in-law, Austin A. King. Killed...

View Full Bio
4

Hyde’s account focused entirely on the battle that ensued around the Big Blue settlement during the late evening of 4 November 1833. Other accounts also depict these events. (See [Edward Partridge], “A History, of the Persecution,” Times and Seasons, Jan. 1840, 1:33–35; see also Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 17–19; and Corrill, Brief History, 20.)  


[illegible]  Tuesday5

5 November 1833.  


morning there were a number of the Mob  missing and could not be accounted for and  while we was at Liberty landing

Principal commercial docking site for river steamboats and Everett’s Ferry. Located on north shore of Missouri River, about four miles south of county seat, Liberty. Established by 1830, replacing Allen’s Landing, which operated half mile west of this site...

More Info
6

In 1833, Liberty landing was located on the north side of the Missouri River, approximately five miles south of Liberty in Clay County and due north of Independence. It was also known for a time as the Upper Liberty landing. (Parkin, “History of the Latter-day Saints in Clay County,” 39.)  


on wensday7

6 November 1833.  


 a messenger rode up saying that he had Just  came from the seat of war, and that the  night before another battle was fought in  which Mr [Russell] Hicks

Ca. 1805–19 Apr. 1876. Lawyer. Born in Massachusetts. Treasurer of Jackson Co., Missouri, 1827. Deputy clerk of Jackson Co. court, 1833. Permitted to practice law by Cass Co., Missouri, circuit court, 7 Dec. 1835. One of fourteen men who formed a company ...

View Full Bio
fell having three balls  and some buck shot through his body and  about twenty more shared a similar fate  and also that one or two of our men were killed  and as many wounded and he (Orson

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
) heard  the cannonading distinctly8

No armed engagement took place in Jackson County on Tuesday, 5 November 1833. Church leaders decided to leave the county during the early morning hours of that day and surrendered their arms later in the afternoon. “I am happy to state,” Hyde later wrote, by way of correcting his earlier letter, “that I now believe that the report concerning the last engagement was without foundation.” Moreover, the cannonading he heard while on board the steamboat “was only an expression of the triumph and joy of the mob.” (“From Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Jan. 1834, 124–126; [Edward Partridge], “A History, of the Persecution,” Times and Seasons, Jan. 1840, 1:34–35; Orson Hyde, Letter to the Editor, The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833, 120, italics in original.)  


and also stated  that the man who broke open the store

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, directed A. Sidney Gilbert, Newel K. Whitney’s Ohio business partner, to establish store in Independence. Gilbert first purchased vacated log courthouse, located on lot 59 at intersection of Lynn and Lexington Streets, to...

More Info
took  [Sidney] Gilbert

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

View Full Bio
Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

View Full Bio
, and one more for fals imprisonment  and put them in prison and as near as he  could Learn never to let them escape alive9

Orson Hyde, Letter to the Editor, The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833, 120; see also Letter from William W. Phelps, 6–7 Nov. 1833; Letter from John Corrill, 17 Nov. 1833; and “From Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Jan. 1834, 124–126.  


 This statement of bro Orson

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
is some what  different from that of bro Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

View Full Bio
who states  that on friday10

1 November 1833.  


night the brethren had  mustered about 40 or 50 men armed and  marched into the village took one prisoner  and fired one gun11

The details that JS summarized here were omitted from the published, and only extant, version of Phelps’s 6–7 November 1833 letter. (See Letter from William W. Phelps, 6–7 Nov. 1833.)  


and satturday12

2 November 1833.  


fell upon  our brethren above Blue

River rises in Indian Territory and flows northward into Missouri River in Jackson Co., Missouri. Mormon settlement established near river, Dec. 1831. Branch of LDS church established in area on opposite side of river from Kaw Township, by 1833; branch had...

More Info
, and one of [George] Manship  sons mortally wounded.13

A mob attacked a settlement of church members near the Blue River, located approximately eight miles southwest of Independence, on Saturday, 2 November. One of the attackers of the settlement, a young man named Manship, was shot during the skirmish and may have died as a result of the attack.  


On monday14

4 November 1833.  


about  sun set a regular action was fought near  Christian Whitmer

18 Jan. 1798–27 Nov. 1835. Shoemaker. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Married Anna (Anne) Schott, 22 Feb. 1825, at Seneca Co., New York. Ensign in New York militia, 1825. Constable of Fayette, Seneca Co., 1828–1829. Member...

View Full Bio
s under the command of  bro D we had four wounded, they had  five killed wounded and two killed viz Linvil [Thomas Linville]  and Breaseal

Ca. 1803–4 Nov. 1833. Lawyer. Moved to Roane Co., Tennessee, by 1826. Married Amanda M. King, 15 Feb. 1827, in Roane Co. Traveled to Independence, Jackson Co., Missouri, to participate in Mormon War, possibly at urging of brother-in-law, Austin A. King. Killed...

View Full Bio
.15 From friday till tuesday16

1–5 November 1833.  


our  brethren were under arms 150 of our brethren  came forth Like Moroni to battle,17

See Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 340–407 [Alma chaps. 43–63].  


on tuesday18

5 November 1833.  


 morning the mob had 300 and before any [blood] [p. 66]
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JS, Letter, Kirtland Township

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Geauga Co., OH, to Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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, Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Clay Co., MO, 5 Dec. 1833. Retained copy, [ca. 5 Dec. 1833], in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 65–70; handwriting of Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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; JS Collection, CHL. For more complete source information, see the source note for JS Letterbook 1.

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