53991957

Letter to Silas Smith, 26 September 1833

Saints in ancient days, were saved in the Kingdom of God; neither do I doubt but that they held converse and communion with Him27

Instead of “Him,” the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history has “them.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 231.)  


while they were in the flesh, as Paul said to his Corinthian brethren that the Lord Jesus showed Himself to above five hundred Saints at one time after His resurrection.28

1 Corinthians 15:6.  


Job said that he knew that his Redeemer lived and that he should see Him in the flesh in the latter days.29

Job 19:25.  


I may believe that Enoch walked with God and by faith was translated.30

See Genesis 5:24.  


I may believe that Noah was a perfect man in his generation and also walked with God.31

See Genesis 6:9. In the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history, this sentence was missing. Robert Campbell, a clerk in the Church’s Historian’s Office in the 1850s and 1860s, later inserted the following sentence into the history: “I may [believe] that Noah was a perfect man in his generation & also walked with God.” In his role as clerk, Campbell may have become aware that Jesse Smith owned the original sent copy of this JS letter and added this sentence based on what appears in that version. (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 231.)  


I may believe that Abraham communed with God and conversed with angels.32

See Genesis 17:1; 22:11, 15.  


I may believe that Isaac obtained a renewal of the covenant made to Abraham by the direct voice of the Lord.33

See Genesis 26:2–5.  


I may believe that Jacob conversed with holy angels, and heard the voice34

Instead of “voice,” the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history has “word.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 231.)  


of his Maker, that he wrestled with the angel until he prevailed and obtained the blessing.35

See Genesis 32:24–32.  


I may believe that Elijah was taken to Heaven in a chariot of fire with fiery horses.36

See 2 Kings 2:11.  


I may believe that the saints saw the Lord and conversed with Him face to face after His resurrection.37

See Luke 24:13–51; John 20:19–31; and Acts 1:3–9.  


I may believe that the Hebrew Church came to Mount Zion, and unto the city of the Living God the Heavenly Jerusalem, and to an innumerable company of angels. I may believe that they looked into eternity, and saw the Judge of all, and Jesus the Mediator of the New Covenant.38

See Hebrews 12:22–24.  


But will all this purchase an assurance for me, and39

Instead of “and,” the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history has “or.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


waft me to the regions of eternal day and seat me down in the presence of the King of Kings40

The copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history omits the passage “and seat me down in the presence of the King of Kings.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


with my garments spotless pure and white?
Or must I not rather obtain for myself by my own faith and diligence in keeping the commandments of the Lord, an assurance of salvation for myself? And have I not an equal privilege with the ancient Saints? And will not the Lord hear my prayers and listen to my cries as soon as he ever did to theirs, if I come to him in the manner they did? Or, is he a respecter of persons?41

See Acts 10:34.  


So I must close this subject for want of time, and I may with propriety say at the beginning
We would be glad42

Instead of “glad,” the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history has “pleased.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


to see you in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, we would be glad to see you embrace43

Instead of “we would be glad to see you embrace,” the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history reads “and more pleased to have you embrace.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


the New Covenant and be one with us, we sometimes think you are now one with us in heart.44

The copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history omits the passage “and be one with us, we sometimes think you are now one with us in heart.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


I remain yours affectionately
Joseph Smith Jun
To Silas Smith

1 Oct. 1779–13 Sept. 1839. Farmer. Born in Derryfield (now Manchester), Hillsborough Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Moved to Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts, by 1790. Moved to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, by 1800. Married first...

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45

The copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history omits this address marker. (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


[p. 5]
Saints in ancient days, were saved in the Kingdom of God;  neither do I doubt but that they held converse and communion  with Him27

Instead of “Him,” the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history has “them.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 231.)  


while they were in the flesh, as Paul said to his  Corinthian brethren that the Lord Jesus showed Himself to above  five hundred Saints at one time after His resurrection.28

1 Corinthians 15:6.  


 Job said that he knew that his Redeemer lived and that he should  see Him in the flesh in the latter days.29

Job 19:25.  


I may believe that  Enoch walked with God and by faith was translated.30

See Genesis 5:24.  


I may  believe that Noah was a perfect man in his generation and  also walked with God.31

See Genesis 6:9. In the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history, this sentence was missing. Robert Campbell, a clerk in the Church’s Historian’s Office in the 1850s and 1860s, later inserted the following sentence into the history: “I may [believe] that Noah was a perfect man in his generation & also walked with God.” In his role as clerk, Campbell may have become aware that Jesse Smith owned the original sent copy of this JS letter and added this sentence based on what appears in that version. (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 231.)  


I may believe that Abraham com muned with God and conversed with angels.32

See Genesis 17:1; 22:11, 15.  


I may believe that  Isaac obtained a renewal of the covenant made to Abraham  by the direct voice of the Lord.33

See Genesis 26:2–5.  


I may believe that Jacob conver sed with holy angels, and heard the voice34

Instead of “voice,” the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history has “word.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 231.)  


of his Maker, that he  wrestled with the angel until he prevailed and obtained the bles sing.35

See Genesis 32:24–32.  


I may believe that Elijah was taken to Heaven in a chariot  of fire with fiery horses.36

See 2 Kings 2:11.  


I may believe that the saints saw  the Lord and conversed with Him face to face after His resurrec tion.37

See Luke 24:13–51; John 20:19–31; and Acts 1:3–9.  


I may believe that the Hebrew Church came to Mount Zion,  and unto the city of the Living God the Heavenly Jerusalem,  and to an innumerable company of angels. I may believe that  they looked into eternity, and saw the Judge of all, and Jesus  the Mediator of the New Covenant.38

See Hebrews 12:22–24.  


But will all this pur chase an assurance for me, and39

Instead of “and,” the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history has “or.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


waft me to the regions  of eternal day and seat me down in the presence of the  King of Kings40

The copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history omits the passage “and seat me down in the presence of the King of Kings.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


with my garments spotless pure and white? 
Or must I not rather obtain for myself by my own faith  and diligence in keeping the commandments of the Lord, an  assurance of salvation for myself? And have I not an  equal privilege with the ancient Saints? And will not the Lord  hear my prayers and listen to my cries as soon as he ever  did to theirs, if I come to him in the manner they did?  Or, is he a respecter of persons?41

See Acts 10:34.  


So I must close this subject for want of time, and I  may with propriety say at the beginning
We would be glad42

Instead of “glad,” the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history has “pleased.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


to see you in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
, we would  be glad to see you embrace43

Instead of “we would be glad to see you embrace,” the copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history reads “and more pleased to have you embrace.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


the New Covenant and be one with us,  we sometimes think you are now one with us in heart.44

The copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history omits the passage “and be one with us, we sometimes think you are now one with us in heart.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


I remain yours affectionately
Joseph Smith Jun
To Silas Smith

1 Oct. 1779–13 Sept. 1839. Farmer. Born in Derryfield (now Manchester), Hillsborough Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Moved to Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts, by 1790. Moved to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, by 1800. Married first...

View Full Bio
45

The copy in Lucy Mack Smith’s history omits this address marker. (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 232.)  


[p. 5]
Previous
JS, Letter, Kirtland Township

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Geauga Co., OH, to Silas Smith

1 Oct. 1779–13 Sept. 1839. Farmer. Born in Derryfield (now Manchester), Hillsborough Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Moved to Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts, by 1790. Moved to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, by 1800. Married first...

View Full Bio
, Stockholm

Located in northern New York, about seventy miles southeast of Montreal and about fifteen miles southeast of St. Lawrence River. Landscape hilly and densely forested, with fertile soil. Region drained by St. Regis River. Area settled, by 1803. Formed from...

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, St. Lawrence Co., NY, 26 Sept. 1833. Featured version copied [ca. Oct. 1855] in Jesse Smith, Autobiography and Journal, 2–5; handwriting of Jesse Smith; CHL.
Jesse Smith’s autobiography and journal was inscribed in a large, commercially produced blank book. The book’s ledger paper is horizontally ruled with two red lines above forty faint blue lines on each page. The book underwent conservation efforts in the mid-1990s. The leaves measure 14 × 8⅝ inches (36 × 22 cm). The volume measures 14½ × 10 × 2¼ inches (37 × 25 × 6 cm). The volume contains 655 inscribed pages followed by 31 blank pages. The first 23 pages contain Smith’s autobiography and his family history. Included in those 23 pages are a transcript of the letter featured here; the conversion story of his father, Silas Smith

1 Oct. 1779–13 Sept. 1839. Farmer. Born in Derryfield (now Manchester), Hillsborough Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Moved to Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts, by 1790. Moved to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, by 1800. Married first...

View Full Bio
; a copy of Jesse’s patriarchal blessing; and Jesse’s family history to October 1855. In October 1855, Jesse Smith began using the ledger as a journal. This volume was used as Smith’s personal journal in Utah and Arizona from 1855 until his death in 1906. The last entry is dated 5 June 1906.
It is likely that Silas Smith

1 Oct. 1779–13 Sept. 1839. Farmer. Born in Derryfield (now Manchester), Hillsborough Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Moved to Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts, by 1790. Moved to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, by 1800. Married first...

View Full Bio
passed the original letter to his son Jesse Smith, who kept it but wanted to make a second copy. It is unknown when Jesse Smith’s volume was donated to the Church History Library or by whom. This journal was labeled “Journal #174” by staff of Church History Library and was received by the Church Historian’s Office prior to the 1940s when clerk Alice M. Rich transcribed its contents.1

Jesse Smith, Autobiography and Journal, typescript, CHL.  


Facts