30722

Minutes, 23 March 1833–A

to act as such in this eastern branch of the Church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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6

The second entry in Minute Book 1 dated 23 March 1833 stated that Coe and Thayer “shall be ordained to purcha[se] land for the saints in Kirtland.” (Minutes, 23 Mar. 1833–B.)  


There being no further business the councel closed by prayer——
Frederick G Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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Clk PT pro tempore [p. 19]
to act as such in this eastern branch of the  Church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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6

The second entry in Minute Book 1 dated 23 March 1833 stated that Coe and Thayer “shall be ordained to purcha[se] land for the saints in Kirtland.” (Minutes, 23 Mar. 1833–B.)  


There b[e]ing no further busin[e]ss the  councel closed by prayer——
<F[rederick] G Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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Clk PT [pro tempore]> [p. 19]
Previous
On 23 March 1833, a meeting of high priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

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and elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

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convened in the schoolroom at Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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’s store

In Apr. 1826, Whitney purchased quarter-acre lot on northeast corner of Chardon and Chillicothe roads and built two-story, 1500-square-foot, white store. Mercantile store also functioned as Kirtland Mills post office. Whitney met JS at store, 4 Feb. 1831....

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to chart a course for acquiring more land for the church in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio. An earlier revelation declared the importance of maintaining possession of Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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’s centrally located farm, “for I the Lord willeth to retain a strong hold in the Land of Kirtland for the space of five years.”1

Revelation, 11 Sept. 1831 [D&C 64:21].  


JS’s later history further indicated that the purpose of purchasing land was to encourage and accommodate the growth of the church in Kirtland. The history stated that this “council was called for the purpose of appointing a committee to purchase land in Kirtland, upon which the Saints might build a stake

Ecclesiastical organization of church members in a particular locale. Stakes were typically large local organizations of church members; stake leaders could include a presidency, a high council, and a bishopric. Some revelations referred to stakes “to” or...

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of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

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.”2

JS History, vol. A-1, 282.  


Urgency to accomplish their goal was demonstrated during the meeting as participants left to carry out assignments, while the remainder did not adjourn but awaited their return for several hours “in prayer and fasting.”
Though multiple farms are mentioned in the minutes, only the 103-acre farm

Consisted of 103 acres formerly owned by Peter French. Purchased for LDS church for $5,000, 1833. Area used to build houses, including JS’s; community buildings, such as new schoolhouse; and House of the Lord. Kirtland residents called area “French farm” ...

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owned by Peter French

Ca. 1774–after 1850. Farmer, tavern keeper, hotelier. Born in New York. Moved to Willoughby, Western Reserve (later Lake Co.), Ohio, 1799. Married Sally. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1811, as one of its earliest settlers. Named as one of town proprietors...

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was acquired as a result of this meeting.3

Zebedee Coltrin’s journal states, “On the 23d day of March held a council of highh Priests to investgate the subject of Purch[as]ing the brick tavern and farm owned by Peter French it was agreed to buy it and several othe[r] farms.” (Coltrin, Diary and Notebook, 23 Mar. 1833.)  


All of the land that church leaders considered purchasing was located near property already controlled by the church. A large part of French’s land, for instance, abutted Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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’s 144-acre farm, which Williams had allowed JS and the church to use as early as spring 1831.4 Part of French’s land was also adjacent to Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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’s store

In Apr. 1826, Whitney purchased quarter-acre lot on northeast corner of Chardon and Chillicothe roads and built two-story, 1500-square-foot, white store. Mercantile store also functioned as Kirtland Mills post office. Whitney met JS at store, 4 Feb. 1831....

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, where many meetings of JS and other church leaders, including this one, were held throughout 1833. Aside from its location, French’s land was desirable for other reasons. For one, it contained a two-story brick building, which was located on a major road in the area and used as an inn.5

Although the purchase of Peter French’s property included the brick home, the church apparently did not have immediate access to the building. The deed stipulated that the sale was “subject to a lease given to Thomas Knight of the brick house and privilege contained in said lease.” (Geauga Co., OH, Deed Records, 1795–1921, vol. 17, p. 360, 10 Apr. 1833, microfilm 20,237, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  


The most important feature of the property to church leaders, however, was the brickyard, which they deemed necessary for building structures that would accommodate Kirtland’s growing population.6

As JS’s history explained, the “French farm was purchased on account of the facilities for making brick, their being essential to the building up of the city.” (JS History, vol. A-1, 283.)  


Though the deed was not signed until 10 April 1833, a council meeting held on 2 April anticipated the acquisition of the French farm and assigned Frederick G. Williams “to be an agent to super[in]tend and employ some person or persons to carry on the brick yard on the french farm and also letting out the farm.”7
While the minutes indicate that Joseph Coe

12 Nov. 1784–17 Oct. 1854. Farmer, clerk. Born at Cayuga Co., New York. Son of Joel Coe and Huldah Horton. Lived at Scipio, Cayuga Co., by 1800. Married first Pallas Wales, 12 Jan. 1816. Married second Sophia Harwood, ca. 1824. Moved to Macedon, Wayne Co....

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and Ezra Thayer

14 Oct. 1791–6 Sept. 1862. Farmer, gardener, builder. Born in New York. Married Elizabeth Frank. Lived at Bloomfield, Ontario Co., New York, 1820. Lived at Farmington, Ontario Co., 1830. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt and confirmed by JS, fall...

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were assigned to jointly superintend the purchase of the farms named, Coe alone signed the agreement with Peter French

Ca. 1774–after 1850. Farmer, tavern keeper, hotelier. Born in New York. Moved to Willoughby, Western Reserve (later Lake Co.), Ohio, 1799. Married Sally. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1811, as one of its earliest settlers. Named as one of town proprietors...

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for the sale of his property on 10 April 1833. French agreed to sell his land for $5,000. Coe made a down payment of $2,000 and then through promissory notes agreed to pay the remaining $3,000 in two separate payments of $1,500 each.8

Along with the justice of the peace, Josiah Jones, Ezra Thayer was a witness to the deed, which enumerated the promissory notes. (Geauga Co., OH, Deed Records, 1795–1921, vol. 17, pp. 38–39, 10 Apr. 1833, microfilm 20,237, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  


One of the notes was due 10 April 1834, and the second was due on the same date in 1835, both with an unstated payment of interest in addition to the listed sum. Because of the high cost of the French farm and the anticipated purchase of two other farms, on 23 March 1833 JS also assigned over a dozen elders to serve missions to both proselytize and acquire funds to help pay for the properties. Of the two minute book entries that record the events of this meeting, the first one, featured here, reports the meeting’s general proceedings; the second denominates the various missionary companionships that were to be sent out as a result of the decision to purchase more property.9

Minutes, 23 Mar. 1833–B. Zebedee Coltrin explained that the decision to purchase the farm “made it necessary to call the Elders out of school for the purpose of going again into the world and procuring means for Paying for the farms.” (Coltrin, Diary and Notebook, 23 Mar. 1833.)  


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