53991751

Minutes, 24 February 1834

Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Feb.’ 24, 1834.
The high council

A governing body of twelve high priests. The first high council was organized in Kirtland, Ohio, on 17 February 1834 “for the purpose of settling important difficulties which might arise in the church, which could not be settled by the church, or the bishop...

View Glossary
of the Church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
met this day at the house of Joseph Smith Junr. for the purpose of giveing an audience or hearing to Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
and Parley P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
, representatives from Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
, to represent to us the state of the church in that place.1

According to Lyman Wight’s journal, he and Pratt departed Missouri on 12 January 1834 and arrived in Kirtland on 22 February. (Wight, Journal, in History of the Reorganized Church, 1:401–402.)  


Joseph, the president,2

Revised minutes of the meeting on 17 February 1834, which organized the high council, explained that the president of the church was “also the president of the council,” in accordance with “the dignity of his office.” (Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:9–10].)  


opened the council by prayer. Two of the standing counsellors were absent, namely, Joseph Coe

12 Nov. 1784–17 Oct. 1854. Farmer, clerk. Born at Cayuga Co., New York. Son of Joel Coe and Huldah Horton. Lived at Scipio, Cayuga Co., by 1800. Married first Pallas Wales, 12 Jan. 1816. Married second Sophia Harwood, ca. 1824. Moved to Macedon, Wayne Co....

View Full Bio
and John Smith

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

View Full Bio
. Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
was chosen to act in the place of John Smith

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

View Full Bio
and John P Greene

3 Sept. 1793–10 Sept. 1844. Farmer, shoemaker, printer, publisher. Born at Herkimer, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of John Coddington Greene and Anna Chapman. Married first Rhoda Young, 11 Feb. 1813. Moved to Aurelius, Cayuga Co., New York, 1814; to Brownsville...

View Full Bio
to act in the place of Joseph Coe

12 Nov. 1784–17 Oct. 1854. Farmer, clerk. Born at Cayuga Co., New York. Son of Joel Coe and Huldah Horton. Lived at Scipio, Cayuga Co., by 1800. Married first Pallas Wales, 12 Jan. 1816. Married second Sophia Harwood, ca. 1824. Moved to Macedon, Wayne Co....

View Full Bio
.3

The high council was required to have at least seven of the twelve regularly appointed counselors in attendance to act. Those seven had “power to appoint other high priests whom they may consider worthy and capable to act in the place of absent counsellors.” (Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:6–7].)  


Thus the high council was organized and six of the counsellors were appointed to speak.4

The number of counselors appointed to speak depended on the difficulty of the issue. If the issue was not deemed difficult, only two were appointed to speak. For a case that was considered difficult, four were appointed, “and if more difficult, six”—the maximum number that could be appointed. (Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:14].)  


Bro’s. P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
and L. Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
, messengers from Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
, arose and laid their business before the council and delivered their message. the substance of which, was, an inquiry when, how and by what means Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
was to be redeemed from our enemies.5

The 16–17 December 1833 revelation referred to two means by which the redemption of Zion would occur: raising a force of young and middle-aged men to reclaim the land and having branches of the church raise money to purchase land in Missouri, on which church members could then gather. (Revelation, 16–17 Dec. 1833 [D&C 101:55–56, 67–74].)  


They said that our brethern who had been driven away from their lands and scattered abroad had found so much favour in the eyes of the people that they could obtain food and raiment of them for their labour insomuch that they were comfortable.6

According to one report, residents of Clay County, to which the majority of church members had fled, were “as kind and accommodating” to the refugees “as could reasonably be expected.” (Parley P. Pratt et al., “‘The Mormons’ So Called,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Extra, Feb. 1834, [2].)  


But the idea of being driven away from the land of Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
pained their very souls and they desired of God, by earnest prayer, to return with songs of everlasting joy as said Isaiah, the Prophet.7

See Isaiah 35:10; 51:11.  


They also said that none of their lands were sold into [p. 41]
Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
, Feb.’ 24, 1834.
The high council

A governing body of twelve high priests. The first high council was organized in Kirtland, Ohio, on 17 February 1834 “for the purpose of settling important difficulties which might arise in the church, which could not be settled by the church, or the bishop...

View Glossary
of the Church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
met this day at  the house of Joseph Smith Junr. for the purpose of giveing  an audience or hearing to Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
and Parley [P.] Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
,  representatives from Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
, to represent to us the state of the  church in that place.1

According to Lyman Wight’s journal, he and Pratt departed Missouri on 12 January 1834 and arrived in Kirtland on 22 February. (Wight, Journal, in History of the Reorganized Church, 1:401–402.)  


Joseph, the president,2

Revised minutes of the meeting on 17 February 1834, which organized the high council, explained that the president of the church was “also the president of the council,” in accordance with “the dignity of his office.” (Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:9–10].)  


opened the council by prayer.  Two of the standing counsellors were absent, namely, Joseph  Coe

12 Nov. 1784–17 Oct. 1854. Farmer, clerk. Born at Cayuga Co., New York. Son of Joel Coe and Huldah Horton. Lived at Scipio, Cayuga Co., by 1800. Married first Pallas Wales, 12 Jan. 1816. Married second Sophia Harwood, ca. 1824. Moved to Macedon, Wayne Co....

View Full Bio
and John Smith

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

View Full Bio
. Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
was chosen to act  in the place of John Smith

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

View Full Bio
and John P Green[e]

3 Sept. 1793–10 Sept. 1844. Farmer, shoemaker, printer, publisher. Born at Herkimer, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of John Coddington Greene and Anna Chapman. Married first Rhoda Young, 11 Feb. 1813. Moved to Aurelius, Cayuga Co., New York, 1814; to Brownsville...

View Full Bio
to act  in the place of Joseph Coe

12 Nov. 1784–17 Oct. 1854. Farmer, clerk. Born at Cayuga Co., New York. Son of Joel Coe and Huldah Horton. Lived at Scipio, Cayuga Co., by 1800. Married first Pallas Wales, 12 Jan. 1816. Married second Sophia Harwood, ca. 1824. Moved to Macedon, Wayne Co....

View Full Bio
.3

The high council was required to have at least seven of the twelve regularly appointed counselors in attendance to act. Those seven had “power to appoint other high priests whom they may consider worthy and capable to act in the place of absent counsellors.” (Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:6–7].)  


Thus the high council was organiz[e]d  and six of the counsellors were appointed to speak.4

The number of counselors appointed to speak depended on the difficulty of the issue. If the issue was not deemed difficult, only two were appointed to speak. For a case that was considered difficult, four were appointed, “and if more difficult, six”—the maximum number that could be appointed. (Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102:14].)  


Bro’s. P.  Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
and L. Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
, messengers from Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
, arose and laid  their business before the council and delivered their message.  the substance of which, was, an inquiry when, how and by  what means Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
was to be redeemed from our enemies.5

The 16–17 December 1833 revelation referred to two means by which the redemption of Zion would occur: raising a force of young and middle-aged men to reclaim the land and having branches of the church raise money to purchase land in Missouri, on which church members could then gather. (Revelation, 16–17 Dec. 1833 [D&C 101:55–56, 67–74].)  


They  said that our brethern who had been driven away from  their lands and scattered abroad had found so much  favour in the eyes of the people that they could obtain  food and raiment of them for their labour insomuch  that they were comfortable.6

According to one report, residents of Clay County, to which the majority of church members had fled, were “as kind and accommodating” to the refugees “as could reasonably be expected.” (Parley P. Pratt et al., “‘The Mormons’ So Called,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Extra, Feb. 1834, [2].)  


But the idea of being driven  away from the land of Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
pained their very souls and  they desired of God, by earnest prayer, to return with  songs of everlasting joy as said Isaiah, the Prophet.7

See Isaiah 35:10; 51:11.  


They also said that none of their lands were sold into [p. 41]
Next
On 24 February 1834, the Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
, Ohio, high council

A governing body of twelve high priests. The first high council was organized in Kirtland, Ohio, on 17 February 1834 “for the purpose of settling important difficulties which might arise in the church, which could not be settled by the church, or the bishop...

View Glossary
—formed just the week before1

See Historical Introduction to Revised Minutes, 18–19 Feb. 1834 [D&C 102].  


—met to hear a report from Parley P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
and Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
about the condition of church members who had been driven from their homes in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, Missouri, in November 1833. Church leaders in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
had sent several letters to JS and others reporting on the attacks that had led to their expulsion and requesting guidance; JS replied with counsel concerning their situation and instructions to maintain ownership of their Jackson County lands.2 On 16–17 December 1833, JS dictated a revelation declaring that “Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
shall not be moved out of her place notwithstanding her children are scattered.” Through a parable of a nobleman and his vineyard, the revelation explained that “the strength of mine house which are my wariors my young men and they that are of middle age” were to “break down the walls of mine enemies th[r]ow down their tower and scatte[r] their watchmen,” thereby redeeming the Lord’s vineyard, or Zion.3

Revelation, 16–17 Dec. 1833 [D&C 101:17, 55–57].  


JS sent a copy of this revelation, along with other instructions, to Missouri church leaders on 22 January 1834.4
Before they received the December 1833 revelation, Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
church members held a conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

View Glossary
in early January 1834, where they determined to send two individuals to Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
.5

William E. McLellin, who was likely present at this conference, later remembered the conference being held on 1 January 1834. (Larson and Passey, William E. McLellin Papers, 418.)  


Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
and Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
volunteered. According to a later recollection of Pratt, the conference instructed them “to counsel with President Smith and the Church at Kirtland, and take some measures for the relief or restoration of the people thus plundered and driven from their homes.”6

Pratt, Autobiography, 114.  


As the body tasked with “settleing important difficulties which might arise in the church,”7 the Kirtland high council, over which JS presided, heard Pratt and Wight’s report on 24 February 1834. The two men also asked how and when church members would return to Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
. JS then declared his intention to travel to Missouri to assist in redeeming Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
, and between thirty and forty conference attendees volunteered to go with him.
JS may have volunteered to go to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
because of instructions given in a revelation dictated the same day as this high council meeting was held. That revelation specifically designated JS as the “servant” mentioned in the 16–17 December 1833 revelation who was supposed to raise the group that would redeem Zion. The revelation also instructed several individuals, including JS, Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
, and Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
, to begin recruiting for the expedition and specified that the group should number at least one hundred and preferably five hundred individuals.8

Revelation, 24 Feb. 1834 [D&C 103:21–22, 30, 37–40].  


It is not clear when on 24 February JS dictated the revelation, but if he did so before or during the high council meeting, JS would have had authority, given to him by the revelation, to assume the responsibility of commanding the expedition at the meeting.9

A later history of JS indicates the council was held after the revelation was dictated and does not provide any other contextual information. (JS History, vol. A-1, 437–441, addenda, 3nD.)  


JS could have also dictated the revelation after the council meeting; if so, the revelation would have confirmed the high council’s decisions made earlier that day. Regardless, just two days later, JS and the others designated in the revelation began recruiting additional volunteers to go to Missouri and eventually formed an expedition, known as the Camp of Israel

A group of approximately 205 men and about 20 women and children led by JS to Missouri, May–July 1834, to redeem Zion by helping the Saints who had been driven from Jackson County, Missouri, regain their lands; later referred to as “Zion’s Camp.” A 24 February...

View Glossary
, of more than two hundred individuals who traveled to Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

More Info
, Missouri, in the summer of 1834.10

JS, Journal, 26–28 Feb. 1834; Pratt, Autobiography, 116–122; Minutes, 17 Mar. 1834; Backman, Profile, appendix E; Woodruff, Journal, 1 May 1834; Account with the Church of Christ, ca. 11–29 Aug. 1834.  


Facts