30727

Minutes, 6 June 1833

This, day called a conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

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of High priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

View Glossary
6th. June 1833— Bro Joseph opened by prayer. Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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being nominated a Clerk for the presidency of the High priesthood

The highest presiding body of the church. An 11 November 1831 revelation stated that the president of the high priesthood was to preside over the church. JS was ordained as president of the high priesthood on 25 January 1832. In March 1832, JS appointed two...

View Glossary
.1 seconded and duly chosen by vote, and took his seat to act.—2

Previously, Frederick G. Williams had served as a clerk for meetings. He also served as a counselor in the presidency of the high priesthood. Beginning 15 March 1833, Williams ceased signing minutes simply as “clerk” and began signing them “Clk PT [clerk pro tempore].” Hyde began his duties as clerk immediately after his appointment and likely recorded these minutes. He then copied these minutes and penned the next several entries in Minute Book 1. Hyde alone recorded and copied minutes into Minute Book 1 from 26 December 1833 to 19 February 1834, when Oliver Cowdery joined him as a clerk. (Note, 9 Jan. 1833; Revelation, 8 Mar. 1833 [D&C 90:6]; Minute Book 1, 15 Mar. 1833; Minutes, 18 Mar. 1833; Minutes, 13 July 1833.)  


The occasion of the conference being called, was this. to council the committee who were appointed to take the oversight of the building of the House of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
.3

See Minutes, 4 May 1833; Revelation, 1 June 1833 [D&C 95:11–17]; Minutes, ca. 1 June 1833; and Hyrum Smith et al., Kirtland, OH, to “the Churches of Christ,” 1 June 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 36–38.  


These are the names of the committee Reynolds Cahoon

30 Apr. 1790–29 Apr. 1861. Farmer, tanner, builder. Born at Cambridge, Washington Co., New York. Son of William Cahoon Jr. and Mehitable Hodges. Married Thirza Stiles, 11 Dec. 1810. Moved to northeastern Ohio, 1811. Located at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co.,...

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Jared Carter

14 June 1801–6 July 1849. Born at Killingworth, Middlesex Co., Connecticut. Son of Gideon Carter and Johanna Sims. Moved to Benson, Rutland Co., Vermont, by 1810. Married Lydia Ames, 20 Sept. 1823, at Benson. Moved to Chenango, Broome Co., New York, by Jan...

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& Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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.4

At this time Hyrum Smith and Reynolds Cahoon were serving as counselors to Bishop Newel K. Whitney. Jared Carter was the moderator for the conference of high priests that organized the fund-raising committee for the House of the Lord on 4 May 1833. (Cahoon, Diary, 10 Feb. 1832; Minutes, 4 May 1833.)  


It was voted by the conference that the committee proceed immediately to commence building the House

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

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or obtaining material, Stone Brick Lumber &c—5

According to Hyrum Smith’s diary, construction work commenced the next day, 7 June 1833. It is likely that Smith’s contemporaneous account is accurate, though other historical sources provide several conflicting dates. For instance, in JS’s manuscript history, Willard Richards made a later insertion, likely in the 1840s, that gives 5 June as the start date: “June 5 Geo. A. Smith drawed the first load of stone for the Temple and Hyrum Smith & Reynolds Cahoon commenced digging the trench for the walls of the Lord’s House and fin[i]shed the same with their own hands.” The next entry in JS’s manuscript history, however, suggests that construction had not yet begun. Richards’s insertion was later published in History of the Church as the only entry for 5 June, and subsequently 5 June has often been perpetuated by later histories of the House of the Lord as the date that work on the building began. Richards, however, contradicted himself when making notes for JS’s history in the back of Revelation Book 2. From memory he wrote that “Hyrum Smith, & Reynolds Cahoon commenced digging the trench for the walls of the Lords house on the 6 of June. and accomplished the same by their own hands.” Lucy Mack Smith’s reminiscent account creates more uncertainty. She wrote that in the afternoon following the 6 June conference, Hyrum declared, “I am determined to be the first at the work” and that he “commenced digging away the Earth where the stone were to be laid.” She mistakenly recalled, however, that the conference occurred on a Saturday, which could not have been 6 June 1833 but rather would have been 1 or 8 June 1833. Regardless of these discrepancies, construction on the temple likely began shortly after authorization was given at this 6 June conference. (JS History, vol. A-1, 302; History of the Church, 1:353; Notes for JS History, ca. 1843, [1]; Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845, bk. 14, [1]; see also Robison, First Mormon Temple, 28.)  


[p. 21]
This, day called a conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

View Glossary
of High priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

View Glossary
6th. June 1833—  Bro Joseph opened by prayer. Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
being nominated a  Clerk for the presidency of the High priesthood

The highest presiding body of the church. An 11 November 1831 revelation stated that the president of the high priesthood was to preside over the church. JS was ordained as president of the high priesthood on 25 January 1832. In March 1832, JS appointed two...

View Glossary
.1 seconded and duly  chosen by vote, and took his seat to act.—2

Previously, Frederick G. Williams had served as a clerk for meetings. He also served as a counselor in the presidency of the high priesthood. Beginning 15 March 1833, Williams ceased signing minutes simply as “clerk” and began signing them “Clk PT [clerk pro tempore].” Hyde began his duties as clerk immediately after his appointment and likely recorded these minutes. He then copied these minutes and penned the next several entries in Minute Book 1. Hyde alone recorded and copied minutes into Minute Book 1 from 26 December 1833 to 19 February 1834, when Oliver Cowdery joined him as a clerk. (Note, 9 Jan. 1833; Revelation, 8 Mar. 1833 [D&C 90:6]; Minute Book 1, 15 Mar. 1833; Minutes, 18 Mar. 1833; Minutes, 13 July 1833.)  


The occasion of the  conference being called, was this. to council the committee who were ap pointed to take the oversight of the building of the House of the  Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
.3

See Minutes, 4 May 1833; Revelation, 1 June 1833 [D&C 95:11–17]; Minutes, ca. 1 June 1833; and Hyrum Smith et al., Kirtland, OH, to “the Churches of Christ,” 1 June 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 36–38.  


These are the names of the committee Reynolds Cahoon

30 Apr. 1790–29 Apr. 1861. Farmer, tanner, builder. Born at Cambridge, Washington Co., New York. Son of William Cahoon Jr. and Mehitable Hodges. Married Thirza Stiles, 11 Dec. 1810. Moved to northeastern Ohio, 1811. Located at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co.,...

View Full Bio
 Jared Carter

14 June 1801–6 July 1849. Born at Killingworth, Middlesex Co., Connecticut. Son of Gideon Carter and Johanna Sims. Moved to Benson, Rutland Co., Vermont, by 1810. Married Lydia Ames, 20 Sept. 1823, at Benson. Moved to Chenango, Broome Co., New York, by Jan...

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& Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
.4

At this time Hyrum Smith and Reynolds Cahoon were serving as counselors to Bishop Newel K. Whitney. Jared Carter was the moderator for the conference of high priests that organized the fund-raising committee for the House of the Lord on 4 May 1833. (Cahoon, Diary, 10 Feb. 1832; Minutes, 4 May 1833.)  


It was voted by the conference that  the committee proceed immediately to commence building the House

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
 or obtaining material, Stone Brick Lumber &c—5

According to Hyrum Smith’s diary, construction work commenced the next day, 7 June 1833. It is likely that Smith’s contemporaneous account is accurate, though other historical sources provide several conflicting dates. For instance, in JS’s manuscript history, Willard Richards made a later insertion, likely in the 1840s, that gives 5 June as the start date: “June 5 Geo. A. Smith drawed the first load of stone for the Temple and Hyrum Smith & Reynolds Cahoon commenced digging the trench for the walls of the Lord’s House and fin[i]shed the same with their own hands.” The next entry in JS’s manuscript history, however, suggests that construction had not yet begun. Richards’s insertion was later published in History of the Church as the only entry for 5 June, and subsequently 5 June has often been perpetuated by later histories of the House of the Lord as the date that work on the building began. Richards, however, contradicted himself when making notes for JS’s history in the back of Revelation Book 2. From memory he wrote that “Hyrum Smith, & Reynolds Cahoon commenced digging the trench for the walls of the Lords house on the 6 of June. and accomplished the same by their own hands.” Lucy Mack Smith’s reminiscent account creates more uncertainty. She wrote that in the afternoon following the 6 June conference, Hyrum declared, “I am determined to be the first at the work” and that he “commenced digging away the Earth where the stone were to be laid.” She mistakenly recalled, however, that the conference occurred on a Saturday, which could not have been 6 June 1833 but rather would have been 1 or 8 June 1833. Regardless of these discrepancies, construction on the temple likely began shortly after authorization was given at this 6 June conference. (JS History, vol. A-1, 302; History of the Church, 1:353; Notes for JS History, ca. 1843, [1]; Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845, bk. 14, [1]; see also Robison, First Mormon Temple, 28.)  


[p. 21]
At a conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

View Glossary
of high priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

View Glossary
held on 6 June 1833, participants sustained Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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as a clerk for the presidency of the high priesthood

Both the office of the president of the high priesthood and the body comprising the president and his counselors; the presiding body of the church. In November 1831, a revelation directed the appointment of a president of the high priesthood. The individual...

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. For much of the year prior to this conference, Hyde had traveled in the eastern United States

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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as a missionary.1

See Hyde, Journal, 22 Dec. 1832.  


Beginning in March 1833, he served with Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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on a mission to several areas in the East, including Elk Creek

Settled 1797. Incorporated 1800. Population in 1830 about 560. Population in 1840 about 1,600. Situated on Elk Creek. Included Elk Creek post office. JS traveled through township during missions, 1833 and 1834. Branch of LDS church organized, 1833.

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, Pennsylvania.2 Then in April, Hyde was assigned to serve with Doctor Philastus Hurlbut

3 Feb. 1809–16 June 1883. Clergyman, farmer. Born at Chittenden Co., Vermont. “Doctor” was his given name. Preacher for Methodist Episcopal Church in Jamestown, Chautauque Co., New York. Baptized into LDS church, 1832/1833, at Jamestown. Ordained an elder...

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at Conneaut Township, Pennsylvania.3

“History of Orson Hyde,” Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, 1856–1858, 1861, CHL; see also Hyrum Smith, Diary, 5 Apr. 1833, [12]–[13]; Historical Introduction to Minutes, ca. 1 June 1833; and Coltrin, Diary and Notebook, 4 Apr. 1833.  


Hyde likely returned to Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, before 1 June 1833.4

While the date of Hyde’s arrival in Kirtland is uncertain, it was likely before 1 June, as he was apparently present at a conference of high priests held that day to consider the case of Doctor Philastus Hurlbut. Hyde later explained that at the meeting he preferred charges against Hurlbut “for an attempt at seduction and crime.” (Minutes, ca. 1 June 1833; Orson Hyde, London, England, to George J. Adams, Bedford, England, 7 June 1841, in Winchester, Plain Facts, 26.)  


He began his duties as clerk by 6 June and served alongside Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, who had served as a clerk pro tempore for the first half of the year. Williams continued to act in that capacity until September 1833, and Hyde served as clerk and sole scribe for entries in Minute Book 1 from 26 December 1833 to 17 February 1834.5

See Minute Book 1, 28 Sept. 1833.  


The following minutes of the 6 June conference, which Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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recorded, note the authorization to immediately begin constructing the House of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
. Building the House of the Lord had been mandated by a JS revelation in late 1832.6 At a conference held on 4 May 1833, Jared Carter

14 June 1801–6 July 1849. Born at Killingworth, Middlesex Co., Connecticut. Son of Gideon Carter and Johanna Sims. Moved to Benson, Rutland Co., Vermont, by 1810. Married Lydia Ames, 20 Sept. 1823, at Benson. Moved to Chenango, Broome Co., New York, by Jan...

View Full Bio
, Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
, and Reynolds Cahoon

30 Apr. 1790–29 Apr. 1861. Farmer, tanner, builder. Born at Cambridge, Washington Co., New York. Son of William Cahoon Jr. and Mehitable Hodges. Married Thirza Stiles, 11 Dec. 1810. Moved to northeastern Ohio, 1811. Located at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co.,...

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were appointed as a committee to raise funds for the construction of the House of the Lord.7 On 1 June, JS dictated a revelation that chastised the church leaders for their lack of progress on building the house and, likely in response to that revelation, the aforementioned committee prepared a circular addressed to the Church of Christ

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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that requested funds needed to begin construction.8

Revelation, 1 June 1833 [D&C 95:3]; Hyrum Smith et al., Kirtland, OH, to “the Churches of Christ,” 1 June 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 36–38.  


Following the dictation of that revelation, a conference of high priests appointed JS, Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, and Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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—the presidency of the high priesthood—“to obtain a draft or construction of the inner court of the house

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

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” and to serve as a planning committee.9 At the conference of high priests featured in the minutes here, Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
, Carter

14 June 1801–6 July 1849. Born at Killingworth, Middlesex Co., Connecticut. Son of Gideon Carter and Johanna Sims. Moved to Benson, Rutland Co., Vermont, by 1810. Married Lydia Ames, 20 Sept. 1823, at Benson. Moved to Chenango, Broome Co., New York, by Jan...

View Full Bio
, and Cahoon

30 Apr. 1790–29 Apr. 1861. Farmer, tanner, builder. Born at Cambridge, Washington Co., New York. Son of William Cahoon Jr. and Mehitable Hodges. Married Thirza Stiles, 11 Dec. 1810. Moved to northeastern Ohio, 1811. Located at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co.,...

View Full Bio
received counsel, and their responsibilities expanded from fund-raising to overseeing the construction of the House of the Lord. The conference also directed the building committee to commence work on the house immediately. A day later, Hyrum began clearing ground and digging the foundation for the building; he wrote in his journal, “This Day Commenced making Preparation for the Building the House of the lord.”10

Hyrum Smith, Diary, 7 June 1833, [15].  


By 25 June, JS reported to church leaders in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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that although the “number of disciples in K[irtland]

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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is, about 150,” they had “commenced building the House of the Lord in this place, and it goes on rapidly.” According to a July 1835 account, the first stone for the House of the Lord was “laid on the twenty-third of July, 1833.”11

Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 25 June 1833; [William W. Phelps], “The House of God,” LDS Messenger and Advocate, July 1835, 1:147.  


By fall 1833 the stone foundation walls were in place and bricks had been produced locally for the external walls, though the bricks were never used for that purpose.12

When Ira Ames arrived in Kirtland around the beginning of October 1833, he “found the Saints had begun to build a Temple there, it was raised up to the first floor.” Artemus Millet wrote that when he first visited Kirtland in 1833 the work on the temple had been suspended. (Ames, Autobiography, [10]; Millet, Reminiscences, 3; see also Johnson, Reminiscences and Journal, 18.)  


On 10 October 1833, Frederick G. Williams wrote that in the absence of JS, who was serving a proselytizing mission in Canada

In late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, Canada referred to British colonies of Upper Canada and Lower Canada. Divided into Upper Canada and Lower Canada, 1791; reunited 10 Feb. 1841. Boundaries corresponded roughly to present-day Ontario (Upper...

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, a council decided to “discontinue the building of the temple for the winter for want of materials and to prepare and get all things ready to recommence it early in the spring.”13

Frederick G. Williams, Kirtland, OH, to “Dear Brethren,” 10 Oct. 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 57–58.  


The next phase of substantial construction on the House of the Lord began in mid-1834.

Facts