30717

Plan of the House of the Lord, between 1 and 25 June 1833

Plan of Interior

Section 1

Broad stair
vestry
121/2 by 3
14½ by 8 feet 8 inches

Section 2

Presidents of the Priesthood No 1 3½ by 6
Priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. In the Book of Mormon, priests were described as those who baptized, administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto the church,” and taught “the things pertaining to the kingdom of God.” A June 1829 revelation directed...

View Glossary
No 2 seat
3½ by 6
Teacher

Generally, one who instructs, but also an ecclesiastical and priesthood office. The Book of Mormon explained that teachers were to be ordained “to preach repentance and remission of sins through Jesus Christ, by the endurance of faith on his name to the end...

View Glossary
No 3 seat
3½ by 6
3½ by 6 3½ by 8 3½ by 6
+c. Deacon

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. The “Articles and Covenants” directed deacons to assist teachers in their duties. Deacons were also to “warn, expound, exhort, and teach and invite all to come unto Christ.” Although deacons did not have the authority...

View Glossary
No 4 seat
4 feet wide

Section 3

from this dotted line go up stairs. Broad Stair
vestry
12 by 3

Section 4

14½ feet long 3 feet wide
 
14½ by 9

Section 5

11 feet 10 inch by 3 11 feet 10 inch by 3

Section 6

Scale of the floor 4 feet to an inch
14½ feet long 3 feet wide
14½ by 9

Section 7

12½ by 3 feet.
10 feet by 3½

Section 8

5 feet wide Swing table
4 feet wide
8 feet long
No 4
No 3
No 2
No 1

Section 9

12½ by 3
10 feet by 3½

Explanation of Interior

This house of the Lord

The official name for the sacred edifice in Kirtland, Ohio, later known as the Kirtland temple; also the official name for other planned religious structures in Missouri. JS and the Latter-day Saints also referred to the House of the Lord in Kirtland as “...

View Glossary
1

The term “house of the Lord” was used in the Old Testament to refer to the temple Solomon built. (See 1 Kings 6:2; 7:51; 8:11.)  


for the Presidency

Both the office of the president of the high priesthood and the body comprising the president and his counselors; the presiding body of the church. In November 1831, a revelation directed the appointment of a president of the high priesthood. The individual...

View Glossary
2

The presidency of the high priesthood. This House of the Lord was also to be used for religious instruction and worship. For information on changes that had been recently made to the presidency of the high priesthood, see Historical Introduction to Revelation, 8 Mar. 1833 [D&C 90].  


is Eighty Seven feet Long and Sixty one feet wide3

These figures are the building’s interior dimensions.  


and ten feet taken off on the east end for the stairway leaves the inner court4

Similar to the House of the Lord in Kirtland, this temple was to have two courts, or assembly halls, one stacked above the other. The inner court refers to the meeting room on the lower, or first, level. Use of the term court reflects influence from the Bible, in which different sections of the temples were called courts. The entry for court in Webster’s 1828 dictionary says that “places of public worship are called the courts of the Lord.” One court in this temple was likely for the community, and the other was for the school where men ordained to the priesthood would be instructed. (“Court,” in American Dictionary, italics in original; see also 1 Kings 6:36; Ezekiel 44:27; and Revelation, 1 June 1833 [D&C 95:15–16].)  


785

This appears to be an error as eighty-seven feet subtracted by ten feet would be seventy-seven feet, not seventy-eight.  


by 61 feet which is calculated and divided for seats in the following manner viz— the two Aisles 4 feet wide each the middle block of pews are 11 feet 10 inches long and three feet wide each and the two lines drawn through the middle are 4 inchs apart for which a curtain is to drop at right angles and divide the house in to four parts if necessary6

In other words, “the central block of pews was to have a four-inch gap dividing it lengthwise into two equal parts. In addition, the central and the lateral blocks were to be divided widthwise by another four-inch gap. These gaps allowed curtains, or ‘vails,’ . . . to be unrolled from the ceiling and pass to the floor, thereby quartering the congregational area.” Although this feature seems unusual, a “moveable partition down the middle of the auditorium” that could be used to separate the audience into two groups was a common feature in contemporary Quaker meetinghouses. (Robison, First Mormon Temple, 20, 85–93; Rose, Colonial Houses of Worship in America, 71.)  


the side Block of pews opposite the above are 14 feet 6 inches long and 3 feet wide the 5 pews in each corner of the house are 12 feet 6 inches long the open spaces between the corner and side pews are for fire places those in the west are 9 feet wide and the East ones are 8 feet 8 inches wide and the chimney carried up in the wall where they are marked with a pencil
The pulpit7

According to John Corrill, in each of the assembly halls “were built two pulpits, one in each end. Each pulpit consisted of four different apartments. . . . Each of these apartments was just large enough, and rightly calculated to receive three persons, and the breast-work in front of each . . . was constituted of three semi-circles, joining each other, and finished in good style.” The four apartments were to be staggered like stairs, each one built higher and further back than the one in front of it. (Corrill, Brief History, 21–22.)  


in the west end of the house is to be occupied by the high priest hood

The authority and power held by certain officers in the church. The Book of Mormon referred to the high priesthood as God’s “holy order, which was after the order of his Son,” and indicated that Melchizedek, a biblical figure, was a high priest “after this...

View Glossary
as follows8

The rows of the pulpit are described in descending order, beginning with the most elevated row. Because the lowest row of pulpits mentioned in the subsequent list was designated for the elders, “high priest hood” is here used more broadly than its typical reference to only ordained high priests. For more information on the high priesthood, see Minutes, ca. 3–4 June 1831.  


No 1 for the president and his council

Both the office of the president of the high priesthood and the body comprising the president and his counselors; the presiding body of the church. In November 1831, a revelation directed the appointment of a president of the high priesthood. The individual...

View Glossary
9 No 2d for the Bishop & his council

A governing body comprising a bishop and his counselors. The bishop’s council was charged with overseeing the temporal affairs of the church, administering goods under the law of consecration, and assisting the poor. The bishop’s council had authority to ...

View Glossary
No 3d for the High priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

View Glossary
and No 4 for the Elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
each of these are 8 feet long containing 3 coves or stands for the respective speaker10

No “coves” or speaker stands were called for on the bottom pulpit row designated for the elders. Instead, a swing table was to be attached to the front.  


and their seats opposite of them11

That is, to each side of them.  


are for visiting officers who are to occupy the seats according to their respective grades the 2 spaces in the middle are stairs 2 feet wide, the middle pulpit is to be ellevated the first seats one foot the 2d two feet the 3d 3 feet & the fourth 4 feet12

Architectural historian Elwin C. Robison explains, “Each row of pulpits was to be raised above the previous row, with the central pulpit higher than the flanking ones. The specifications on both sets of drawings for the Independence Temple state that the central pews in each row should rise in twelve-inch increments, while the pulpits to each side should increase in eight-inch increments. The intent of this directive was probably to elevate the central pulpits four inches above the flanking ones. However, if the pulpits were built as described on the drawing, the uppermost central pulpit would be four times four inches, or sixteen inches, above its flanking pulpits and would require two steps leading from the side to the central pulpit. Unfortunately, lack of space would run such steps into the adjacent pulpit. Perhaps this unresolved problem led carpenters [who later worked on the Kirtland temple] to dispense with making the central pulpit higher and to build all three pulpits in each row at the same elevation.” (Robison, First Mormon Temple, 19–20.)  


[p. [1]]
Plan of Interior

Section 1

Broad stair
vestry
14½ feet by 3
121/2 by 3
12 14½ by 8 feet 4 8 inches

Section 2

Presiden[t]s of the Priesthood  No 1 3½ by 6
Priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. In the Book of Mormon, priests were described as those who baptized, administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto the church,” and taught “the things pertaining to the kingdom of God.” A June 1829 revelation directed...

View Glossary
No 2 seat
3½ by 6
Teacher

Generally, one who instructs, but also an ecclesiastical and priesthood office. The Book of Mormon explained that teachers were to be ordained “to preach repentance and remission of sins through Jesus Christ, by the endurance of faith on his name to the end...

View Glossary
No 3 seat
3½ by 6
3½ by 6 3½ by 4 8 3½ by 6
+c. Deaco[n]

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. The “Articles and Covenants” directed deacons to assist teachers in their duties. Deacons were also to “warn, expound, exhort, and teach and invite all to come unto Christ.” Although deacons did not have the authority...

View Glossary
No 4 seat
4 feet wide

Section 3

from this  dotted line  go up stairs. Broad  Stair
vestry
14½ feet by 3
12 by 3

Section 4

15 12 14½ feet long 3 feet wide
 
1 14½ by 9

Section 5

11 feet 10 inch by 3 11 feet 10 inch by 3

Section 6

Scale of the floor 4 feet to an inch
15 14½ feet long 3 feet wide
1 14½ by 9

Section 7

12½ by 3 feet.
10 feet by 3½

Section 8

5 feet wide Swing table
4 feet wide
8 feet long
No 4
No 3
No 2
No 1

Section 9

12½ by 3
10 feet by 3½

Explanation of Interior

This house of  the Lord

The official name for the sacred edifice in Kirtland, Ohio, later known as the Kirtland temple; also the official name for other planned religious structures in Missouri. JS and the Latter-day Saints also referred to the House of the Lord in Kirtland as “...

View Glossary
1

The term “house of the Lord” was used in the Old Testament to refer to the temple Solomon built. (See 1 Kings 6:2; 7:51; 8:11.)  


for the  Presidency

Both the office of the president of the high priesthood and the body comprising the president and his counselors; the presiding body of the church. In November 1831, a revelation directed the appointment of a president of the high priesthood. The individual...

View Glossary
2

The presidency of the high priesthood. This House of the Lord was also to be used for religious instruction and worship. For information on changes that had been recently made to the presidency of the high priesthood, see Historical Introduction to Revelation, 8 Mar. 1833 [D&C 90].  


is  Eighty Seven  feet Long and  Sixty one feet  wide3

These figures are the building’s interior dimensions.  


and ten  feet taken of[f] on  the east end for  the stairway  leaves the inner  court4

Similar to the House of the Lord in Kirtland, this temple was to have two courts, or assembly halls, one stacked above the other. The inner court refers to the meeting room on the lower, or first, level. Use of the term court reflects influence from the Bible, in which different sections of the temples were called courts. The entry for court in Webster’s 1828 dictionary says that “places of public worship are called the courts of the Lord.” One court in this temple was likely for the community, and the other was for the school where men ordained to the priesthood would be instructed. (“Court,” in American Dictionary, italics in original; see also 1 Kings 6:36; Ezekiel 44:27; and Revelation, 1 June 1833 [D&C 95:15–16].)  


785

This appears to be an error as eighty-seven feet subtracted by ten feet would be seventy-seven feet, not seventy-eight.  


by 61  feet which is  calculated and  divided for seats  in the following  manner viz—  the two Aisles 4  feet wide each  the middle block  of pews are 11 feet  10 inches wide  long and three  feet wide each  and the two lines  drawn through the  middle are 4 inchs  apart for which  a curtain is to  drop at right  angles and divide  the house in to four  parts if necessary6

In other words, “the central block of pews was to have a four-inch gap dividing it lengthwise into two equal parts. In addition, the central and the lateral blocks were to be divided widthwise by another four-inch gap. These gaps allowed curtains, or ‘vails,’ . . . to be unrolled from the ceiling and pass to the floor, thereby quartering the congregational area.” Although this feature seems unusual, a “moveable partition down the middle of the auditorium” that could be used to separate the audience into two groups was a common feature in contemporary Quaker meetinghouses. (Robison, First Mormon Temple, 20, 85–93; Rose, Colonial Houses of Worship in America, 71.)  


 the side block  of pews are 16 feet  <10 inches> 6 inches long and  3 feet wide the  side <Block of> pews opposite  the above are 14  feet 6 inches long  and 3 feet wide  the 5 pews in each  corner of the house  are 12 feet 6 inches  long divided into  5 the open spaces  between the corner  and side pews are  for fire plac[e]s those  in the west are 9  feet wide and  the East ones are  8 feet 8 inches  wide and the  chimney carried  up in the wall  where they are  marked with a  pencil
The pulpit7

According to John Corrill, in each of the assembly halls “were built two pulpits, one in each end. Each pulpit consisted of four different apartments. . . . Each of these apartments was just large enough, and rightly calculated to receive three persons, and the breast-work in front of each . . . was constituted of three semi-circles, joining each other, and finished in good style.” The four apartments were to be staggered like stairs, each one built higher and further back than the one in front of it. (Corrill, Brief History, 21–22.)  


in  the west end of the  house is to be occu pied by the high  priest hood

The authority and power held by certain officers in the church. The Book of Mormon referred to the high priesthood as God’s “holy order, which was after the order of his Son,” and indicated that Melchizedek, a biblical figure, was a high priest “after this...

View Glossary
as foll ows8

The rows of the pulpit are described in descending order, beginning with the most elevated row. Because the lowest row of pulpits mentioned in the subsequent list was designated for the elders, “high priest hood” is here used more broadly than its typical reference to only ordained high priests. For more information on the high priesthood, see Minutes, ca. 3–4 June 1831.  


No 1 for the pres ident and his council

Both the office of the president of the high priesthood and the body comprising the president and his counselors; the presiding body of the church. In November 1831, a revelation directed the appointment of a president of the high priesthood. The individual...

View Glossary
9  No 2d for the Bishop  & his council

A governing body comprising a bishop and his counselors. The bishop’s council was charged with overseeing the temporal affairs of the church, administering goods under the law of consecration, and assisting the poor. The bishop’s council had authority to ...

View Glossary
No 3d  No 3 for the High  priest[s]

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

View Glossary
and No 4  for the Elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
each  of these are 8 feet  long containing 3  coves or stands  for the respective  speaker10

No “coves” or speaker stands were called for on the bottom pulpit row designated for the elders. Instead, a swing table was to be attached to the front.  


and their  seats opposite of  them11

That is, to each side of them.  


are for visi ting officers who are  to occupy the seats  according to their  respective grades  the 2 spaces in the  middle are stairs  2 feet wide, the  middle pulpit is  to be ellevated  the first seats  one foot the 2d  two feet the 3d  3 feet & the  fourth 4 feet12

Architectural historian Elwin C. Robison explains, “Each row of pulpits was to be raised above the previous row, with the central pulpit higher than the flanking ones. The specifications on both sets of drawings for the Independence Temple state that the central pews in each row should rise in twelve-inch increments, while the pulpits to each side should increase in eight-inch increments. The intent of this directive was probably to elevate the central pulpits four inches above the flanking ones. However, if the pulpits were built as described on the drawing, the uppermost central pulpit would be four times four inches, or sixteen inches, above its flanking pulpits and would require two steps leading from the side to the central pulpit. Unfortunately, lack of space would run such steps into the adjacent pulpit. Perhaps this unresolved problem led carpenters [who later worked on the Kirtland temple] to dispense with making the central pulpit higher and to build all three pulpits in each row at the same elevation.” (Robison, First Mormon Temple, 19–20.)  


[p. [1]]
Next
Likely in connection with the development of the House of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

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, or temple, in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, and the need to draft plans for its construction, the presidency of the high priesthood

Both the office of the president of the high priesthood and the body comprising the president and his counselors; the presiding body of the church. In November 1831, a revelation directed the appointment of a president of the high priesthood. The individual...

View Glossary
made plans to build similar temples in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
. In a late June 1833 letter to Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, Missouri, the presidency enclosed a plat for the development of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
, which called for twenty-four houses of the Lord to be constructed in the city’s center. The plat was accompanied by the document featured here, a draft of the architectural plan of a House of the Lord

The official name for the sacred edifice in Kirtland, Ohio, later known as the Kirtland temple; also the official name for other planned religious structures in Missouri. JS and the Latter-day Saints also referred to the House of the Lord in Kirtland as “...

View Glossary
to be built in Missouri.1 The plan featured here was to be the “house of the Lord for the Presidency,” the first of the twenty-four multipurpose houses of the Lord to be constructed in Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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. The building was to be for “the presidency as well as all purposes of Religion and instruction” and was to be “built immediately.”2
By October 1830, leaders of the Church of Christ

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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, directed by revelation, instructed a missionary expedition “unto the Lamanites

A term used in the Book of Mormon to refer to the descendants or followers of Laman, as well as those who later identified themselves as Lamanites because they did not believe in the religious traditions of their ancestors. According to JS and the Book of...

View Glossary
” to locate the spot and “rear up a pillar as a witness where the Temple of God [should] be built, in the glorious New-Jerusalem

The Book of Mormon indicated that, in preparation for Jesus Christ’s second coming, a city should be built on the American continent and called the New Jerusalem. The Book of Mormon further explained that the remnant of the seed of Joseph (understood to be...

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.”3 The location for the temple was not designated, however, until early August 1831, when eight church leaders assembled in Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, Missouri, as JS laid a cornerstone for the “contemplated Temple.”4

Whitmer, History, 32, underlining in original; Revelation, 1 Aug. 1831 [D&C 58:57].  


This temple, according to revelation, was to “be reared in this generation,” though at the time JS sent the temple plan to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, construction on it had not yet begun.5 Back in Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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, church members had also made little progress in constructing the House of the Lord

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

More Info
in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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. Progress had quickened, however, after JS’s 1 June 1833 revelation declared, “Ye have sinned against me a verry grievous sin in that ye have not considered the great commandment

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

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in all things that I have given unto you concerning the building of mine house.”6

Revelation, 1 June 1833 [D&C 95:3].  


The 1 June revelation also promised that “if ye keep my commandments ye shall have power to build” the house

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1831, directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” In Dec. 1832, JS revelation directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS revelation, dated 1 June 1833, chastened...

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and instructed that the house was to be built “after the manner which I shall show unto three of you,” referring to the presidency of the high priesthood.7

Revelation, 1 June 1833 [D&C 95:11, 14]. JS, Sidney Rigdon, and Frederick G. Williams had been appointed to “obtain a draft or construction of the inner court of the house.” (Minutes, ca. 1 June 1833.)  


Shortly thereafter, Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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drew the plans for the House of the Lord that was to be built in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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.8 Williams also drew the plans featured here for a House of the Lord

Plans for Far West included temple on central block. Latter-day Saints in Caldwell Co. made preparations for construction and commenced excavating for foundation, 3 July 1837. However, while visiting Latter-day Saints in Far West, 6 Nov. 1837, JS gave instructions...

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to be built in Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, Missouri. By 25 June 1833, the presidency of the high priesthood approved Williams’s architectural draft of the interior and exterior plans of the Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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House of the Lord.9

Although the original plan does not include a date, the later copy in JS’s letterbook dates the “discription of the house of the Lord which is to be built first in Zion” to 25 June 1833, the date of the letter accompanying the plan. (“A Discription of the House of the Lord Which Is to Be Built First in Zion,” 25 June 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 41–44; Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 25 June 1833.)  


The specifications on the plan for this first temple in Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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provided greater detail for the interior than for the exterior. JS and other church leaders in Kirtland told the recipients of this plan in Missouri that if they did not understand the explanations for the temple or the city plat that accompanied it, “you will inform us, so as you may have a propper understanding, for it is meet that all things should be done according to the pattern.”10 The package containing the plat and this architectural plan arrived in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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on 29 July 1833, just after violence against church members had erupted in Missouri.11

The package consisted of the following documents: the Plat of the City of Zion, ca. Early June–25 June 1833; Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 25 June 1833; and the plan featured here. John Whitmer acknowledged receiving the building “plan of our Lord” in his letter dated 29 July 1833. (Letter from John Whitmer, 29 July 1833.)  


Church leaders in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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later realized that the plat and plan were “drawn in grate haste” and that they included some errors. Thus, several weeks later Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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drew up a new set of plans, accompanied by slightly modified instructions, and sent them to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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. Those plans likely arrived in Missouri in late September 1833.12 The plans to build any of the proposed houses of the Lord in Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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were never realized because of the growing conflict between church members and other residents of Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
.13

A temple was not built in Jackson County, but the temple eventually completed in Kirtland was evidently constructed according to a pattern similar to the one presented here. (See Plan of the House of the Lord in Kirtland, Ohio [Fragments], ca. June 1833.)  


The following transcript presents the plan for the interior of the temple first, the explanation for the interior drawing second, and the combined plan and explanation for the exterior last. For the plan of the interior, the transcript divides the drawing into nine rectangular sections. These nine sections were not numbered originally but are numbered here for the reader’s convenience. The images of the interior plan are all oriented so that the north end of the building is at the top, as in the original document.

Facts