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Proposal for Zion’s City Center from Edward Partridge, circa Late September 1833

Proposal for Zion’s City Center from Edward Partridge, circa Late September 1833

I have marked out the 2 squares below & also the 24 buildings. I have arranged them so as to leave the spaces between them more equal, and according to the natural judgment of man would be preferable to the arrangement on the plat you sent you,— Thinking perhaps that their arrangement was not by revelation, and also that you had not seen them platted out has induced me to plat them this way for you to view & reflect upon1

By rearranging the twenty-four temples in Zion’s central squares so that there would be three temples across and four down, rather than four across and three down, Partridge was able to “leave the spaces between them more equal.” His proposal required him to renumber the temples, but he placed the temple labeled “1” in the southwest corner of the center block, the same location where the first temple appears in the Revised Plat of the City of Zion, ca. Early Aug. 1833.  


Cardinal Directions

2

These cardinal directions appear, respectively, on the left, bottom, and right of the page.  


West
South
East

Proposed Plan for Central Squares

101112
 
789
 
456
 
123
 
4222324rods 4
5⅓
19between 6 & 7 rods20between 6 & 7 rods21
5⅓
161718
5⅓
131415
4 rods
If the plan on this s[page torn] should be considered preferable to the other perhaps it would be wisdom to set the buildings [page torn]rer4

Probably “nearer”.  


the streets than what they are marked5

Even though it provided an extra twenty feet of end-to-end space between the temples, Partridge’s three-across, four-down arrangement still managed to allow a generous four-rod (sixty-six-foot) border between the temples and the streets. Partridge is here suggesting that even more space between the buildings could be gained by reducing that border. The revised plat of the city of Zion called for only a two-rod (thirty-three-foot) separation between the temples and the streets on the east and west sides of the two temple blocks. (See Revised Plat of the City of Zion, ca. Early Aug. 1833.)  


[p. [1]]
I have marked out the 2 squares below & also the 24 buildings. I have arranged them so  as to leave the spaces between them more equal, and according to the natural judgment  of man would be preferable to the arrangement on the plat <you sent you,>— Thinking perhaps that their  arrangement was not by revelation, and that also that you had not seen them platted out has  induced me to plat them this way for you to view & reflect upon1

By rearranging the twenty-four temples in Zion’s central squares so that there would be three temples across and four down, rather than four across and three down, Partridge was able to “leave the spaces between them more equal.” His proposal required him to renumber the temples, but he placed the temple labeled “1” in the southwest corner of the center block, the same location where the first temple appears in the Revised Plat of the City of Zion, ca. Early Aug. 1833.  


Cardinal Directions

2

These cardinal directions appear, respectively, on the left, bottom, and right of the page.  


West
South
East

Proposed Plan for Central Squares

101112
 
789
 
456
 
123
 
4222324rods  4
5⅓
19between  6 & 7  rods20between  6 & 7  rods21
5⅓
161718
5⅓
131415
4  rods
If the plan on this s[page torn]3

TEXT: Possibly “side”.  


should be considered preferable to the other perhaps it would be wisdom  to set the buildings [page torn]rer4

Probably “nearer”.  


the streets than what they are marked5

Even though it provided an extra twenty feet of end-to-end space between the temples, Partridge’s three-across, four-down arrangement still managed to allow a generous four-rod (sixty-six-foot) border between the temples and the streets. Partridge is here suggesting that even more space between the buildings could be gained by reducing that border. The revised plat of the city of Zion called for only a two-rod (thirty-three-foot) separation between the temples and the streets on the east and west sides of the two temple blocks. (See Revised Plat of the City of Zion, ca. Early Aug. 1833.)  


[p. [1]]
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Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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, Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, Jackson Co., MO, Proposal for Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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’s City Center, ca. late Sept. 1833; retained copy, [ca. late Sept. 1833]; handwriting of Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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; one page; Edward Partridge Papers, CHL.
One leaf measuring 7⅜ × 12⅛ inches (19 × 31 cm). The document contains two ink drawings—one on each side of the leaf—of the plat for the city of Zion

Also referred to as New Jerusalem. JS revelation, dated Sept. 1830, prophesied that “city of Zion” would be built among Lamanites (American Indians). JS directed Oliver Cowdery and other missionaries preaching among American Indians in Missouri to find location...

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’s two center blocks with dimensions and explanations. This document and others in the collection underwent conservation efforts in the mid-1980s.
This document, along with other papers belonging to Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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, was in the Partridge family’s possession until at least the mid-1880s, sometime after which it came into the possession of the Church Historian’s Office.1

See Whitney, “Aaronic Priesthood,” 5–6; Partridge, Genealogical Record, 1; and the full bibliographic entry for the Edward Partridge Papers in the CHL catalog.  


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