30712

Proposal for Zion’s City Center from Edward Partridge, circa Late September 1833

Proposal for Zion’s City Center from Edward Partridge, circa Late September 1833

A view of the 24 houses as sent on the plat7

Cardinal Directions

8

The following are cardinal directions that appear, respectively, on the top, left, bottom, and right of the page.  


N
W
S
E

Original Plan for Central Squares

24
64646462
36912 99 ft
10
25811 4
10
214710 4
44
24
6464646
15182124 4
10
14172023 4
10
13161922 4
4
[p. [2]]
A vie[w] [o]f6

TEXT: “vie[hole in paper]f”.  


the 24 houses as sent on the plat7

Cardinal Directions

8

The following are cardinal directions that appear, respectively, on the top, left, bottom, and right of the page.  


N
W
S
E

Original Plan for Central Squares

24
64646462
36912 99 ft
10
25811 4
10
214710 4
44
24
6464646
15182124 4
10
14172023 4
10
13161922 4
4
[p. [2]]
Previous
Over a two-month span, church leaders in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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received two different sets of plats and plans to be used for laying out the city of Zion

Also referred to as New Jerusalem. JS revelation, dated Sept. 1830, prophesied that “city of Zion” would be built among Lamanites (American Indians). JS directed Oliver Cowdery and other missionaries preaching among American Indians in Missouri to find location...

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and constructing religious buildings.1 Remarking on the need to revise the original patterns, Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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wrote that the first city plat was “incorrect, being drawn in haste.”2 Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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redrew the plat and, apparently at JS’s direction, sent the revised version to Missouri with two messengers, Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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and John Gould

21 Dec. 1784–25 June 1855. Pastor, farmer. Born in New Hampshire. Married first Oliva Swanson of Massachusetts. Resided at Portsmouth, Rockingham Co., New Hampshire, 1808. Lived in Vermont. Moved to northern Pennsylvania, 1817. Served as minister in Freewill...

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, who left Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, between 18 August and 4 September and arrived in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, Missouri, in late September.3

Revised Plat of the City of Zion, ca. Early Aug. 1833; Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 18 Aug. 1833; Letter to Vienna Jaques, 4 Sept. 1833. Orson Hyde later wrote that he and Gould had been directed by JS to travel to Jackson County “with special instructions to the Saints there. . . . We arrived in Jackson County about the beginning of the Saints’ troubles there.” According to Newel Knight’s history, Hyde and Gould arrived in “the latter part of September” with “counsel and instruction from brother Joseph, so that they might help us in our unpleasant circumstances.” (“History of Orson Hyde,” 12, Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, 1856–1858, 1861, CHL; Knight, History, 439–440.)  


In the document featured here, Bishop

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. JS appointed Edward Partridge as the first bishop in February 1831. Following this appointment, Partridge functioned as the local leader of the church in Missouri. Later revelations described a bishop’s duties as receiving...

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Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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proposed a further modification to the revised plat by rearranging the twenty-four temples in the city’s two central blocks.
To Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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, Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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’s remark that the first version of the city plat was incorrect may have suggested that further modifications, particularly to the plat, were welcome. Even though the original explanation of the plan of the House of the Lord sent in June 1833 stated that “the plot for the City and the size form and dime[n]sions of the house were given us of the Lord,”4 Partridge apparently thought that the arrangement of central temple blocks on the revised version “was not by revelation.” His suggested alterations adjusted the positions of the temples to create more equal spacing between the buildings on each square. On the revised plat sent to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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in August 1833, the temples were set back four rods (sixty-six feet) from the street on the north and south sides and two rods (thirty-three feet) back on the east and west sides.5

A rod is equal to 16½ feet.  


The revised plat also called for a four-rod (sixty-six-foot) separation between the east and west ends of the respective buildings and a ten-rod (165-foot) separation between the north and south ends of the buildings. Partridge, on the other hand, suggested a four-rod (sixty-six-foot) setback between the buildings and the streets on all sides. He rearranged the temple rows and reconfigured the buildings within the temple blocks so that there were three temples across and four down, rather than four across and three down. He additionally proposed putting a space of “between 6 & 7 rods” between the middle column of buildings running north and south and the two outside columns of buildings and a separation of 5⅓ rods (846 feet) between each of the rows of buildings that would run west to east.
Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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revised the plat in the aftermath of the late-July riot that pressured church leaders into signing an agreement to leave Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
,6 which suggests he believed JS’s promise, made in a letter Partridge received in September along with the revised plat, that God “will spedily deliver Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

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” and that “you shall [be] deliverd from you[r] dainger and shall again flurish in spite of hell.”7 However, by mid-November Partridge and many church members had been forced to leave Jackson County and relocate to Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, Missouri, a move that indefinitely suspended any building plans for the Church of Christ

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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’s city of Zion

Also referred to as New Jerusalem. JS revelation, dated Sept. 1830, prophesied that “city of Zion” would be built among Lamanites (American Indians). JS directed Oliver Cowdery and other missionaries preaching among American Indians in Missouri to find location...

More Info
.8
Given that Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

View Full Bio
drew both of the plat maps sent to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
and that JS responded to an earlier query from Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
relative to the plat,9 Partridge could have addressed the document to either Williams or JS or to the entire presidency of the high priesthood

Both the office of the president of the high priesthood and the body comprising the president and his counselors; the presiding body of the church. In November 1831, a revelation directed the appointment of a president of the high priesthood. The individual...

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. If Partridge finished these revisions by the end of September, he could have sent them to Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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before the renewal of violence in Missouri. If he chose not to trust the mail with this sensitive document, he may have sent it to Kirtland with Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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and Gould

21 Dec. 1784–25 June 1855. Pastor, farmer. Born in New Hampshire. Married first Oliva Swanson of Massachusetts. Resided at Portsmouth, Rockingham Co., New Hampshire, 1808. Lived in Vermont. Moved to northern Pennsylvania, 1817. Served as minister in Freewill...

View Full Bio
in November.10

“The Outrage in Jackson County, Missouri,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833, 118; JS, Journal, 25 Nov. 1833.  


However, no evidence confirms that JS or Williams received this document. The extant version of the revised plan and explanation was one retained by Partridge, and whether it is a copy or the original is not known.
In the presentation that follows, images of individual blocks appear next to their corresponding transcripts. Any text that was written sideways on the document is transcribed as being right side up. Images are oriented with the north side up, as in the original document.

Facts