53991752

Revelation, 24 February 1834 [D&C 103]

Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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, upon the lands which I have bought with moneys that have been consecrated

The dedicating of money, lands, goods, or one’s own life for sacred purposes. Both the New Testament and Book of Mormon referred to some groups having “all things common” economically; the Book of Mormon also referred to individuals who consecrated or dedicated...

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unto me; & let all the churches

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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send up wise men with their moneys & purchase lands, even as I have commanded

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

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them.18

See Revelation, 16–17 Dec. 1833 [D&C 101:55–56, 72–74]. Acting on the counsel given here, church members in Lewis, New York, sent John Tippets and Joseph Tippets to Kirtland in November 1834 as “Wise men appointed by the voice of the church.” They came with cash and property totaling nearly $850 “for the purpose of purchasing land in Jackson County or counties, round about, for the inheritance of the church.” (Minute Book 1, 28 Nov. 1834.)  


And inasmuch as mine enemies come against you to drive you from my goodly land which I have consecrated to be the land of Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
; even from your own lands after these testimonies which ye have brought before me against them, ye shall curse them; & whomsoever ye curse I will curse, And ye shall avenge me of mine enemies;19

See Isaiah 1:24; and Revelation, 16–17 Dec. 1833 [D&C 101:58].  


and my [p. [13]]
Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
, upon the lands which I  have bought with moneys that  have been consecrated

The dedicating of money, lands, goods, or one’s own life for sacred purposes. Both the New Testament and Book of Mormon referred to some groups having “all things common” economically; the Book of Mormon also referred to individuals who consecrated or dedicated...

View Glossary
unto  me; a & let all the churches

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
 send up wise men with their  moneys & purchase lands, even  as I have commanded

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

View Glossary
them.18

See Revelation, 16–17 Dec. 1833 [D&C 101:55–56, 72–74]. Acting on the counsel given here, church members in Lewis, New York, sent John Tippets and Joseph Tippets to Kirtland in November 1834 as “Wise men appointed by the voice of the church.” They came with cash and property totaling nearly $850 “for the purpose of purchasing land in Jackson County or counties, round about, for the inheritance of the church.” (Minute Book 1, 28 Nov. 1834.)  


And  inasmuch as mine enemies come  against you to drive you from  my goodly land which I have  consecrated to be the land of  Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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; even from your own lands  after these testimonies which ye  have brought before me again st them, ye shall curse them;  & whomsoever ye curse I will  curse, And ye shall avenge  me of mine enemies;19

See Isaiah 1:24; and Revelation, 16–17 Dec. 1833 [D&C 101:58].  


and my [p. [13]]
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JS dictated a revelation on 24 February 1834 that instructed the church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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how to restore Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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members to their Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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lands, from which they had been driven in the fall of 1833.1

For additional information on the historical context of this revelation, see Minutes, 24 Feb. 1834.  


The same day that this revelation was dictated, Parley P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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and Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

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, who had traveled from Missouri to Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, reported to the Kirtland high council

A governing body of twelve high priests. The first high council was organized in Kirtland, Ohio, on 17 February 1834 “for the purpose of settling important difficulties which might arise in the church, which could not be settled by the church, or the bishop...

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on the condition of the Missouri members, most of whom had taken refuge in Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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.2

Parley P. Pratt et al., “‘The Mormons’ So Called,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Extra, Feb. 1834, [1]–[2].  


Pratt and Wight also asked the high council “how and by what means Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

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was to be redeemed from our enemies.” JS then volunteered to lead an expedition to Missouri to assist in Zion’s redemption, and thirty or forty others stated they would go with him. Before adjourning, the council appointed JS as “Commander in Chief of the Armies of Israel and the leader of those who volunteered to go.”3
Extant records do not state whether this revelation was dictated before, during, or after the high council meeting. The revelation is addressed to the Lord’s “Friends,” a term other revelations used to refer to high priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. Christ and many ancient prophets, including Abraham, were described as being high priests. The Book of Mormon used the term high priest to denote one appointed to lead the church. However, the Book of Mormon also discussed...

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, suggesting that it may have been dictated in a gathering such as the high council. A September 1832 revelation, for example, explained that “Gods High priests” were the “friends” of Jesus Christ.4

Revelation, 22–23 Sept. 1832 [D&C 84:63, 77]. Several other revelations dictated in late 1832 and throughout 1833 also referred to the high priests to whom the revelations were directed as “friends.” (See, for example, Revelation, 27–28 Dec. 1832 [D&C 88:3, 62]; Revelation, 6 May 1833 [D&C 93:45]; and Revelation, 6 Aug. 1833 [D&C 98:1].)  


Yet it is difficult to determine whether the revelation motivated the decisions of JS and others in the high council or whether those decisions were affirmed by the revelation’s dictation. Regardless, the revelation addressed many of the issues discussed in the high council meeting.
The revelation also reiterated promises made in a 16–17 December 1833 revelation that the Lord would allow church members to return to Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
and the lands of their inheritance if they hearkened to his counsel. It also reemphasized the December revelation’s message that Zion would be redeemed when the Lord’s servant—designated in this February 1834 revelation as JS—led “the strength of mine house,” which was the Lord’s “wariors my young men and they that are of middle age,” to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, where they would “break down the walls of mine enemies th[r]ow down their tower and scatte[r] their watchmen.”5

Revelation, 16–17 Dec. 1833 [D&C 101:55–57].  


In addition, the revelation gave instructions on how to recruit men for such an expedition and stated that between one and five hundred men would be necessary to redeem Zion.
JS and others quickly acted on the revelation’s directions. Just two days later, he and Parley P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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“started from home to obtain volenteers for Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

More Info
,” and Orson Pratt

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

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and Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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did the same.6

JS, Journal, 26–28 Feb. 1834; Pratt, Diary, 26–27 Feb. 1834.  


Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

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and Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, also appointed in the revelation as recruiters, apparently left Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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on 28 February. It is not clear when Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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and Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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, the other pair assigned in the revelation to recruit members for the expedition, departed, but John Murdock

15 July 1792–23 Dec. 1871. Farmer. Born at Kortright, Delaware Co., New York. Son of John Murdock Sr. and Eleanor Riggs. Joined Lutheran Dutch Church, ca. 1817, then Presbyterian Seceder Church shortly after. Moved to Orange, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ca. 1819....

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reported that Hyrum Smith was at Edmund Bosley

25 June 1776–15 Dec. 1846. Miller. Born at Northumberland, Northumberland Co., Pennsylvania. Son of John P. Bosley and Hannah Bull. Married Ann Kelly of Northumberland Co. Lived at Livonia, Livingston Co., New York, 1792–1834. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co...

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’s home in Livonia

Created 1808. Population in 1830 about 2,700. Included Livonia village.

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, New York, on 15 March 1834.7

Wight, Journal, in History of the Reorganized Church, 1:402; Murdock, Journal, 15 Mar. 1834.  


For the next several weeks, these eight men held meetings in which they preached, recruited volunteers, and raised funds to help restore the refugees to their homes in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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.8

See, for example, Pratt, Autobiography, 116–122; Pratt, Diary, 26 Feb.–20 Apr. 1834; JS, Journal, 4–7 Mar. 1834; and Minutes, 17 Mar. 1834.  


These activities ultimately resulted in the formation of the Camp of Israel

A group of approximately 205 men and about 20 women and children led by JS to Missouri, May–July 1834, to redeem Zion by helping the Saints who had been driven from Jackson County, Missouri, regain their lands; later referred to as “Zion’s Camp.” A 24 February...

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, an expedition of more than two hundred individuals that marched to Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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, Missouri, in the summer of 1834.9

See Backman, Profile, appendix E; Account with the Church of Christ, ca. 11–29 Aug. 1834.  


By May 1834, the 24 February revelation was apparently known among those outside of the Church of Christ

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
as well. For example, a Norwalk, Ohio, newspaper article stated that “in obedience to a revelation communicated to their great Prophet, Joseph Smith, three hundred young men are to ‘go well armed and equipped to defend the promised land in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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.’”10

“Mormonism,” Huron Reflector (Norwalk, OH), 20 May 1834, [2], italics in original.  


Three early manuscript copies of the revelation exist. One—the text featured here—was inscribed by Orson Pratt

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

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, probably not long after the revelation was dictated and possibly before Pratt left on 26 February 1834 for New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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.11

Pratt, Diary, 26 Feb. 1834.  


Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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made the second version when he copied the text into Revelation Book 2 in August 1834.12 John Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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also made a copy of the revelation in Revelation Book 1, possibly sometime in the summer of 1834 after JS and the Camp of Israel had reached Clay County

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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.13 The three copies are identical except for minor differences in punctuation and capitalization.

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