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Revelation, 8 March 1833 [D&C 90]

one with another let your families be small especially mine aged Servant Joseph

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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as pertaining to thou who do not belong to your families that those things that are provided for you to bring to pass my work are not taken from you and given to those that are not worthy and thereby you are hindred in accomplishing those things which I have commanded you30

This sentence likely refers to Joseph Smith Sr.’s arrangement to live and work on Frederick G. Williams’s farm. Lucy Mack Smith later wrote that “on this farm my family were all established with this arrangement, that we were to cultivate the farm and from the fruit of our labor we were to receive our support; but all over and above this was to be used for the comfort of strangers or brethren, who were travelling through the place.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 206; see also Historical Introduction to Revelation, 15 May 1831.)  


and again verely I say unto you it is my will that my hand maid Viana Vienna Jaques

10 June 1787–7 Feb. 1884. Laundress, nurse. Born in Beverly, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Henry Jaques and Lucinda Hughes. Lived in Boston, 1827–1830. Baptized into LDS church by E. Harris, 12 July 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833....

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should receive money to bear her expences and go up unto the Land of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
and the residue of her money I will consecrate

The dedicating of money, lands, goods, or one’s own life for sacred purposes. Both the New Testament and Book of Mormon referred to some groups having “all things common” economically; the Book of Mormon also referred to individuals who consecrated or dedicated...

View Glossary
unto myself and reward her in mine own due time verely I say unto you that it is meet in mine eyes that she should go up unto the Land of Zion and receive an inheritance

Generally referred to land promised by or received from God for the church and its members. A January 1831 revelation promised church members a land of inheritance. In March and May 1831, JS dictated revelations commanding members “to purchase lands for an...

View Glossary
31

See, for example, Numbers 34:14; and Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 565 [Ether 12:32].  


from the hand of the Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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that she may settle down in peace32

See Psalm 4:8; and Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 158, 332 [Mosiah 2:28; Alma 38:15].  


in as much as she is faithful and not be Idle in her days from thenceforth33

Jaques had recently “collected her means and gathered with the Saints, and by her liberality rendered such pecuniary assistance to the Church in its infancy.” The following month a conference of high priests decided that “Sister Vean Jaqush [Vienna Jaques] should not immediately procede on her Journy to Zion but to wait untill William Hobert gets ready and go in company with him.” On 2 July 1833, the presidents of the high priesthood wrote to church leaders in Zion, saying that “we rejoiced greatly to hear of the safe arival of Sister Viana and brother William and thank our heavenly father that their lives have been spared them till their arival.” JS wrote to Jaques in September 1833 thanking her for her financial contributions; he noted that he was indebted to her for her offering. (George Hamlin, “In Memoriam,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 Mar. 1884, 12:152; Minutes, 30 Apr. 1833; Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 2 July 1833; Letter to Vienna Jaques, 4 Sept. 1833.)  


and behold verely I say unto you that ye shall write this commandment and say unto your brethren in Zion in Love greeting that I have called you also to preside over Zion in mine own due time therefore let them cease wearying me34

See Isaiah 7:13; and Malachi 2:17.  


concerning this matter35

A reference to the ongoing disputes between church leaders in Kirtland, Ohio, and those in Jackson County, Missouri. (See Letter to William W. Phelps, 11 Jan. 1833; and Letter to Edward Partridge et al., 14 Jan. 1833.)  


behold I say unto you that your brethren in Zion begin to repent36

JS soon learned that the letter calling the Missouri leaders to repentance, sent on 14 January 1833 from Kirtland, achieved its desired goal of effecting a reconciliation between church leaders in Independence and those in Kirtland. The Missouri elders sent a penitent and peace-proffering letter dated 26 February 1833, which was received by church officials in Kirtland with relief and delight. (Letter to Edward Partridge et al., 14 Jan. 1833; Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 21 Apr. 1833.)  


and the Angels rejoice over them nevertheless I am not well pleased with many things and I am not well pleased with my servant William E McLellin

18 Jan. 1806–14 Mar. 1883. Schoolteacher, physician, publisher. Born at Smith Co., Tennessee. Son of Charles McLellin and Sarah (a Cherokee Indian). Married first Cynthia Ann, 30 July 1829. Wife died, by summer 1831. Baptized into LDS church by Hyrum Smith...

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neither with my servant sidney Gilbert

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

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and the Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
also and others have many things to repent of37

A conference met in Kirtland on 3 December 1832 and excommunicated McLellin for reasons that were not specified but were likely related to either his earlier failure to complete several missions or his unauthorized immigration to Missouri. At the time of this revelation, McLellin was serving a mission with Parley P. Pratt in Illinois and eastern Missouri. Sidney Gilbert may have been chastised here because of failure to satisfactorily carry out instructions given him in a July 1831 revelation to serve as an agent for the church, to “establish a store” to obtain money for the “good of the Saints” in Missouri, and to do his business “in righteousness.” Gilbert also penned a letter, no longer extant, on 10 December 1832 to JS, which a conference of high priests and elders in Kirtland decided contained “low, dark, & blind insinuations.” In a letter to Missouri leaders on behalf of the conference, Orson Hyde and Hyrum Smith encouraged Gilbert to “do his business in the spirit of the Lord” and to repent and do the work that the Lord commanded of him. In April, JS wrote, “We have learned of the Lord that it is his [Gilbert’s] duty to assist all the poor brethren that are pure in heart and that he has done rong in with holding credit from them as they must have assistence for the Lord established him in Zion for that express purpose.” The other individual reprimanded here is Edward Partridge, who was serving as bishop in Independence at this time. The specific reasons for the displeasure with Partridge remain unclear. Though Gilbert and Partridge had both been embroiled in intermittent tensions with JS and Ohio church leaders for more than a year and a half, they were also involved in the 26 February 1833 “special council of High Priests” in Missouri that “kneeled before the Lord & asked him to effect a perfect harmony” between them and their “brethren in Kirtland.” At the time of this revelation, however, JS had not yet learned of the spirit of reconciliation that had come out of that council. (JS, Journal, 3 Dec. 1832; Revelation, 25 Jan. 1832–A [D&C 75:6–8]; Letter to William W. Phelps, 31 July 1832; McLellin, Journal, 8 Mar. 1833; Revelation, 20 July 1831 [D&C 57:6, 8]; Letter to Edward Partridge et al., 14 Jan. 1833; Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 21 Apr. 1833; Minute Book 2, 26 Feb. 1833.)  


but verely I say unto you that I the Lord will contend with Zion38

See Isaiah 49:25; and Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 56 [2 Nephi 6:17].  


and plead with her strong ones39

See Psalms 10:10; 35:1; and Jeremiah 8:16.  


and chasten her untill she overcome and are clean before me for she shall not be moved40

See Psalm 46:5; see also 2 Samuel 7:10; and 1 Chronicles 17:9.  


out of her place I the Lord have spoken it— Amen— [p. [3]]
one with another let your families be small espec ially my mine aged Servant Joseph

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

View Full Bio
as pertaining  to thou who do not belong to your families that  those things that are provided for you to bring  to pass my work are not taken from you  and given to those that are not worthy  and thereby you are hindred in accomplish ing <those things which> I have commanded you30

This sentence likely refers to Joseph Smith Sr.’s arrangement to live and work on Frederick G. Williams’s farm. Lucy Mack Smith later wrote that “on this farm my family were all established with this arrangement, that we were to cultivate the farm and from the fruit of our labor we were to receive our support; but all over and above this was to be used for the comfort of strangers or brethren, who were travelling through the place.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 206; see also Historical Introduction to Revelation, 15 May 1831.)  


and again  verely I say unto you it is my will that my  hand maiden Viana [Vienna Jaques]

10 June 1787–7 Feb. 1884. Laundress, nurse. Born in Beverly, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Henry Jaques and Lucinda Hughes. Lived in Boston, 1827–1830. Baptized into LDS church by E. Harris, 12 July 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1833....

View Full Bio
should receive money  to bear her expences and go up unto the Land  of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
and the residue of her money I will  consecrate

The dedicating of money, lands, goods, or one’s own life for sacred purposes. Both the New Testament and Book of Mormon referred to some groups having “all things common” economically; the Book of Mormon also referred to individuals who consecrated or dedicated...

View Glossary
unto myself and reward her in mine  own due time verely I say unto you <that> it is meet  in mine eyes that she should go up unto the  Land of Zion and receive an inheritance

Generally referred to land promised by or received from God for the church and its members. A January 1831 revelation promised church members a land of inheritance. In March and May 1831, JS dictated revelations commanding members “to purchase lands for an...

View Glossary
31

See, for example, Numbers 34:14; and Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 565 [Ether 12:32].  


from  the hand of the Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
that she may settle down  in peace32

See Psalm 4:8; and Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 158, 332 [Mosiah 2:28; Alma 38:15].  


<in as much as she is faithful> and not be Idle in her days from  thenceforth33

Jaques had recently “collected her means and gathered with the Saints, and by her liberality rendered such pecuniary assistance to the Church in its infancy.” The following month a conference of high priests decided that “Sister Vean Jaqush [Vienna Jaques] should not immediately procede on her Journy to Zion but to wait untill William Hobert gets ready and go in company with him.” On 2 July 1833, the presidents of the high priesthood wrote to church leaders in Zion, saying that “we rejoiced greatly to hear of the safe arival of Sister Viana and brother William and thank our heavenly father that their lives have been spared them till their arival.” JS wrote to Jaques in September 1833 thanking her for her financial contributions; he noted that he was indebted to her for her offering. (George Hamlin, “In Memoriam,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 Mar. 1884, 12:152; Minutes, 30 Apr. 1833; Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 2 July 1833; Letter to Vienna Jaques, 4 Sept. 1833.)  


and behold verely I say unto you  that ye shall write this commandment and  say unto your brethren in Zion in Love greeting  that I have called you also to preside over Zion  in mine own due time therefore let them cease  wear[y]ing me34

See Isaiah 7:13; and Malachi 2:17.  


concerning this matter35

A reference to the ongoing disputes between church leaders in Kirtland, Ohio, and those in Jackson County, Missouri. (See Letter to William W. Phelps, 11 Jan. 1833; and Letter to Edward Partridge et al., 14 Jan. 1833.)  


behold  I say unto you that your brethren in Zion  begin to repent36

JS soon learned that the letter calling the Missouri leaders to repentance, sent on 14 January 1833 from Kirtland, achieved its desired goal of effecting a reconciliation between church leaders in Independence and those in Kirtland. The Missouri elders sent a penitent and peace-proffering letter dated 26 February 1833, which was received by church officials in Kirtland with relief and delight. (Letter to Edward Partridge et al., 14 Jan. 1833; Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 21 Apr. 1833.)  


and the Angels rejoice over  them nevertheless I am not well pleased  with many things and I am not well please[d]  with my servant William E McLel[l]in

18 Jan. 1806–14 Mar. 1883. Schoolteacher, physician, publisher. Born at Smith Co., Tennessee. Son of Charles McLellin and Sarah (a Cherokee Indian). Married first Cynthia Ann, 30 July 1829. Wife died, by summer 1831. Baptized into LDS church by Hyrum Smith...

View Full Bio
neithe[r]  with my servant sidney Gilbert

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

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and the  Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio
also and others have many things to  repent of37

A conference met in Kirtland on 3 December 1832 and excommunicated McLellin for reasons that were not specified but were likely related to either his earlier failure to complete several missions or his unauthorized immigration to Missouri. At the time of this revelation, McLellin was serving a mission with Parley P. Pratt in Illinois and eastern Missouri. Sidney Gilbert may have been chastised here because of failure to satisfactorily carry out instructions given him in a July 1831 revelation to serve as an agent for the church, to “establish a store” to obtain money for the “good of the Saints” in Missouri, and to do his business “in righteousness.” Gilbert also penned a letter, no longer extant, on 10 December 1832 to JS, which a conference of high priests and elders in Kirtland decided contained “low, dark, & blind insinuations.” In a letter to Missouri leaders on behalf of the conference, Orson Hyde and Hyrum Smith encouraged Gilbert to “do his business in the spirit of the Lord” and to repent and do the work that the Lord commanded of him. In April, JS wrote, “We have learned of the Lord that it is his [Gilbert’s] duty to assist all the poor brethren that are pure in heart and that he has done rong in with holding credit from them as they must have assistence for the Lord established him in Zion for that express purpose.” The other individual reprimanded here is Edward Partridge, who was serving as bishop in Independence at this time. The specific reasons for the displeasure with Partridge remain unclear. Though Gilbert and Partridge had both been embroiled in intermittent tensions with JS and Ohio church leaders for more than a year and a half, they were also involved in the 26 February 1833 “special council of High Priests” in Missouri that “kneeled before the Lord & asked him to effect a perfect harmony” between them and their “brethren in Kirtland.” At the time of this revelation, however, JS had not yet learned of the spirit of reconciliation that had come out of that council. (JS, Journal, 3 Dec. 1832; Revelation, 25 Jan. 1832–A [D&C 75:6–8]; Letter to William W. Phelps, 31 July 1832; McLellin, Journal, 8 Mar. 1833; Revelation, 20 July 1831 [D&C 57:6, 8]; Letter to Edward Partridge et al., 14 Jan. 1833; Letter to Church Leaders in Jackson Co., MO, 21 Apr. 1833; Minute Book 2, 26 Feb. 1833.)  


but verely I say unto you that I  the Lord will contend with Zion38

See Isaiah 49:25; and Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 56 [2 Nephi 6:17].  


and plead  with her strong ones39

See Psalms 10:10; 35:1; and Jeremiah 8:16.  


and chasten her untill she  overcome and are clean before me for she shall  not be moved40

See Psalm 46:5; see also 2 Samuel 7:10; and 1 Chronicles 17:9.  


out of her place I the Lord have  spoken it— Am[en]— [p. [3]]
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Revelation, Kirtland Township

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Geauga Co., OH, 8 Mar. 1833; copied [ca. Mar. 1833]; handwriting of Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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; three pages; Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU. Includes docket and archival marking.
Bifolium measuring 12⅜ × 7¾ inches (31 × 20 cm). The document was trifolded both lengthwise and width-wise. A docket was added by Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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in ink, with a later addition in graphite: “Revelation relative to | the Bishops Search. for | an agent | 8 March 1833. <also | to have our families Small>”.
This and several other revelations, along with many other personal and institutional documents kept by Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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, were inherited by his daughter Mary Jane Whitney, who married Isaac Groo. This collection was passed down in the Groo family and donated by members of the family to the Harold B. Lee Library at Brigham Young University during the period 1969–1974.1

Andrus and Fuller, Register of the Newel Kimball Whitney Papers, 24.  


Facts