Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [5], bk. 3
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My Mother was with me and as She she had been assisting in my preparations for traveling She was now returning to her home when we arrived there I had a task to perform which was a severe trial to my feelings one to which I shall ever look back with peculiar sensations that can never be obliterated I was here to take leave of that pious and affectionate parent to whom I was a indebted for all the religious instructions as well as most of the educational priviledges which I had ever received The parting hour came My Mother wept over me long and heartily <​bitterly​> She told me that it was not probable She should ever behold my face again but My Dear said She I have lived long my days are nearly numbered I must soon exchange the things of Earth for another state of existence where I hope to enjoy the society of the Blessed And now as my last admonition I beseech <​you​> to continue faithful in the exercise of every religious duty to the end of your days that I may have the pleasure of embracing you in another fairer World above— After this I pur[s]ued my Journey but a short time untill I discovered that the man who drove the team in which we rode was an unprincipled unfeeling wretch by the manner in which he handled my Goods & money as well as his treatment to my children, especially Joseph who was Still somewhat lame <​this child was compelled by M. H to travel for miles to time <​on​> of foot​> but we bore patiently with repeated aggravations untill we came 20 miles west of Utica when the was one Morning we were preparing as usual for starting on the days journey my oldest came to me said he Mr. Howard has thrown the goods out of the waggon and is about Setting off with the team I told him to call the man in [p. [5], bk. 3]
My Mother was with me as she had been assisting in my preparations for traveling She was now returning to her home when we arrived there I had a task to perform which was a severe trial to my feelings one to which I shall ever look back with peculiar sensations that can never be obliterated I was here to take leave of that pious and affectionate parent to whom I was indebted for all the religious instructions as well as most of the educational priviledges which I had ever received The parting hour came My Mother wept over me long and bitterly She told me that it was not probable She should ever behold my face again but My Dear said She I have lived long my days are nearly numbered I must soon exchange the things of Earth for another state of existence where I hope to enjoy the society of the Blessed And now as my last admonition I beseech you to continue faithful in the exercise of every religious duty to the end of your days that I may have the pleasure of embracing you in another fairer World above— After this I pursued my Journey but a short time untill I discovered that the man who drove the team in which we rode was an unprincipled unfeeling wretch by the manner in which he handled my Goods & money as well as his treatment to my children, especially Joseph who was Still somewhat lame this child was compelled by M. H to travel for miles to time on foot but we bore patiently with repeated aggravations untill we came 20 miles west of Utica when one Morning we were preparing as usual for starting on the days journey my oldest came to me said he Mr. Howard has thrown the goods out of the waggon and is about Setting off with the team I told him to call the man in [p. [5], bk. 3]
Page [5], bk. 3