Introduction to State of Illinois v. Unknown Defendant

Document Transcript

State of Illinois v. Unknown Defendant
Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois, Justice of the Peace Court, 19 June 1840
 
Historical Introduction
On or about 19 June 1840, JS filed a complaint before , a , Illinois, justice of the peace. In the complaint, JS accused an unidentified man—evidently providing a physical description—of swindling. Based upon the complaint, Wells issued a warrant for the man’s arrest, deputizing a “Carnes” to serve it. If the defendant had been apprehended, Wells would have presided over a preliminary examination to determine whether there was sufficient evidence to send the case to the circuit court in , Illinois. The culprit was apparently not found, as Wells did not record the outcome in his docket book.
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.

Footnotes

  1. 1

    Docket Entry, 19 June 1840 [State of Illinois v. Unknown Defendant]. Illinois law defined swindling as the act of using false representations to defraud someone of “any valuable thing.” Conviction would result in a fine up to $1,000 and imprisonment up to six months. (An Act relative to Criminal Jurisprudence [26 Feb. 1833], Public and General Statute Laws of the State of Illinois [1839], p. 225, sec. 142.)  

    The Public and General Statute Laws of the State of Illinois: Containing All the Laws . . . Passed by the Ninth General Assembly, at Their First Session, Commencing December 1, 1834, and Ending February 13, 1835; and at Their Second Session, Commencing December 7, 1835, and Ending January 18, 1836; and Those Passed by the Tenth General Assembly, at Their Session Commencing December 5, 1836, and Ending March 6, 1837; and at Their Special Session, Commencing July 10, and Ending July 22, 1837. . . . Compiled by Jonathan Young Scammon. Chicago: Stephen F. Gale, 1839.

  2. 2

    Docket Entry, 19 June 1840 [State of Illinois v. Unknown Defendant]. This may have been Daniel Carn, who later served as a member of the Nauvoo, Illinois, city watch and as a sergeant in the police force. However, there is no evidence that Carn had any type of civic office until 1842. (Notice, Wasp, 4 June 1842, [3]; Dunham, Account Book, [90].)  

    The Wasp. Nauvoo, IL. Apr. 1842–Apr. 1843.

    Dunham, Jonathan. Account Book, 1825–1844. Jonathan Dunham, Papers, 1825–1846. CHL.

  3. 3

    An Act to Regulate the Apprehension of Offenders, and For Other Purposes [6 Jan. 1827], Public and General Statute Laws of the State of Illinois [1839], p. 238, sec. 3.  

    The Public and General Statute Laws of the State of Illinois: Containing All the Laws . . . Passed by the Ninth General Assembly, at Their First Session, Commencing December 1, 1834, and Ending February 13, 1835; and at Their Second Session, Commencing December 7, 1835, and Ending January 18, 1836; and Those Passed by the Tenth General Assembly, at Their Session Commencing December 5, 1836, and Ending March 6, 1837; and at Their Special Session, Commencing July 10, and Ending July 22, 1837. . . . Compiled by Jonathan Young Scammon. Chicago: Stephen F. Gale, 1839.