Invoice and Letter, Gardner & Patterson to Cahoon, Carter & Co., 15 June 1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

June 15. 1836.
Messrs Ohio
Bo[ugh]t of &
<​0​> 18 Printed Tea Setts <​9​> 8/ <​9​> 9/ 19.38
3 Doz[en] Orange border Plates @ 12/ 4.50
9 Printed Com Dishes @ 8/ 9.00
6 [Printed] Sauce Tureens & Stands @ 6/ 4.50
2 [Printed] Soup Tureens & Stands @ $3.00 6.00
1½ Gro[ss] Printed Teas @ $5.00 7.50
<​0​> 3 Imitation China T Setts @ 26/6 Plates 6 Teas 6 Copper Bowl & T Pot Sugar & Cr[ea]m 9.75
<​not come <​come​>​> 2 White China Tea Setts $7.00 14.00
2 Doz Pr[inte]d Pitchers <​1/2​> 12/ <​1/2​> 20/ <​1/2​> 30/ <​1/2​> 42/ 6.50
<​1 Short 42​> 3½ [Doz] Col[ore]d [Pitchers] <​2​> 18/ <​1​> 28/ <​1/2​> 40/ 10.50
15 [Doz] Edgd Plates <​3​> 5/ <​6​> 4/ <​2​> 3/9 <​2​> 3/6 <​2​> 3/ 7.45
2 [Doz] Toy Cans @ 4/ 1.00
½ [Doz] CC Nappers Ea. 8/ 10/ 12/ 18/ 36/— 4.87
6 pair Ewers & Basins @ 6/ 4.50
1 Doz CC Basins 21/ 2.63
1 [Doz] Cold Mugs 14/ 1.75
1½ [Doz] CC Pitchers 8/ 10/ 18/ 2.25
1 [Doz] End Sugars 14/ 1.75
4 [Doz] Printed Bowls <​2​> 10/ <​2​> 12/ 5.50
4 [Doz] End Bowls Ea 6/ 7/ 6.50
1 Gro End Teas. 24/ 3.00
6 Doz CC Bowls <​3​> 4/ <​3​> 5/ 3.38
1/2 [Doz] Luster Pitchers Ea 15/ 24/ 36/ 4.69
<​0​> 1 [Doz] Printed Tea Pots 40/ 5.00
1 Gro [Printed] Coffees 64/ 8.00
1 Doz CC Chambrs 3.00
1 [Doz] Cold [Chambrs] 30/ 3.75
2 [Doz] Peppers @ 12/ 3.00
1 [Doz] Edgd Bakers <​1/2​> 15/ <​1/2​> 30/ 2.81
1/2 [Doz Edgd] Nappers @ 24/ 1.50
6. 4 bottle britta Castors [Casters] @ 12/— 9.00
Carr[i]ed forw[ar]d 176.96
[p. [1]]
Am[oun]t bro[ugh]t forward $176.66 $176.96
1 4 bottle w◊◊◊ [wood?] fram Castor [Caster] 14/ 1.75
<​2 1 m short​> 6m Percussion Caps @ 4/6 3.38
1 Doz[en] Sun glasses 7/ 6 0.94
2 [Doz] Cruets @ 10/ 2.50
3 [Doz] Salts ass[orte]d @ 12/ 4.50
2 [Doz] Glass Cup plates @ 4/ 1.00
<​2 Each Short​> 4 [Doz] Wines @ 10/ 5.00
<​1/2 Each Short​> 3 [Doz] Decantrs (Ring noch) <​1½​> 21/ <​1½​> 28/ 9.19
<​1/2 Each Short​> 3 [Doz Decantrs] (Plain & Mould) <​1½​> 15/ <​1½​> 21/ 6.75
2 [Doz] Handled Tumblers @ 12/ 3.00
4 [Doz] Tumblers Each 7/ 8/ 9/ ground bottom 12.00
2 [Doz] Tavern [Each] @ 12/ 3.00
3 [Doz] Glass Dishes <​1​> 12/ <​2​> 10/ 4.00
3 pair round [Dishes] @ 8/ 3.00
6 water Decanters @ 6/ 4.50
2 Doz Glass Lamps. <​1/2​> 18/ <​1/2​> 22/ <​1/2​> 30/ <​1/2​> 40/ 6.88
1/2 [Doz Glass] Lanterns @ $6.50 3.25
<​not come​> 2 Persian Tea Setts. @ 15/ T Pot Sugar Cr[ea]m 12 T[e]as & Bowl 3.75
2 Doz CC Plates @ 3/9 0.94
1 [Doz] Glass Jars Ea 16/ 24/ 40/ 10.00
266.29
Freight from New York on 2092 lbs @ $1.00 20.92
3 Casks @ 6/ Cartge 2 4/— 2.75
$289.96
Gentn Above<​(3 doz Large Printd plates not on Bill)​>
[1/4 page blank] [p. [2]]
Messrs
Gent[leme]n
Amend you have the Invoice of your esteemd order— Or rather of what has been packed and sent off— we have to open a few articles in order to Complete you[r] order and will then make up and send anothr package which will complete the whole
This is in one crate and three casks— and was sent to the wharf, acording to dirctions, two or thre[e] days ago and we will give our attention to seeing them off in the first vessell
We received a letter from Mr Nilson at we think it must have been the day you left here enclosing us the amount of your last seasons a/c [account] which we had previously recd of you— In writing to Messrs P. & W. some time ago we enclosed among other papers a drft for the amount of your a/c [account] as we were then very much in want of funds and we did not know when to expect you do we supposed that when you paid the a/c you had seen them and told thm you would pay us— The money how[e]ver is rec[eive]d and we will either let it stand to your credit or return it to you on your intimating your wishes in relation to it— or in fact we do not know that one having sent a drft to P. & W. on you occured to us at the time you paid us your a/c— but we spoke about it the day after and meant to have mentioned it to you when we should see you again— but in the hurry it escaped our recollection—
Mr Robinson a Looking glass maker here has spoken to us once or twice about the order you left with him for L[ooking] Glasses— and requests us to say to you that the extreme difficulty he has had in getting his journeymen to work has prevented his filling your order up to this time— and thinks he will not be able to put it up till some [p. [3]] time next month— We rather think the true reason is that he sells pretty much all of his glasses as fast as he makes them for cash— We usually keep a few of the principal sizes on hand although not much of an assortment— We will in the course of a fortnight have a pretty good stock and shall be glad to have an order from you for then should you not get yours from him as soon as you will require them— Wishing the amend Invoice of ware safe to hand and to your satisfaction we are
Gentn Yur obt Srvts &
Messrs s ware is packed and gone with yours the bill we will send per next mail— please mention it to them
 
<​18¾​>
<​ [JUN] 19 N. [Y.]​>
Messrs
Geauga Co
Ohio
via
 
& Bill Crockry $289.96 June 15th 1836 [p. [4]]

Footnotes

  1. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  2. 1

    A deep earthenware or plated vessel with a lid, usually utilized to serve soup, sauce, or gravy. (“Tureen,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 11:476.)  

    The Oxford English Dictionary. Edited by James A. H. Murray, Henry Bradley, W. A. Craigie, and C. T. Onions. 12 vols. 1933. Reprint, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970.

  3. 2

    Twelve dozen or 144 items. (“Gross,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  4. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  5. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  6. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  7. 3

    Abbreviation for creamware, or cream-colored earthenware, an inexpensive ceramic produced in the 1830s that was light in color. (Miller, “A Revised Set of CC Index Values,” 1.)  

    Miller, George L. “A Revised Set of CC Index Values for Classification and Economic Scaling of English Ceramics from 1787 to 1880.” Historical Archaeology 25, no. 1 (1991): 1–25.

  8. 4

    A pitcher with a wide spout, used to hold water. It was pared with a basin and often used for washing hands. (“Ewer,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  9. 5

    Lusterware or lustreware was a type of ceramic pottery invented in England and widely popular in the nineteenth century. It was produced by applying metal oxide to the surface of pottery, giving it the appearance of silver, gold, or copper. (“Lustre,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 6:515.)  

    The Oxford English Dictionary. Edited by James A. H. Murray, Henry Bradley, W. A. Craigie, and C. T. Onions. 12 vols. 1933. Reprint, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970.

  10. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  11. 6

    A condiment jar for pepper, often decorative. (See 13th Annual Illustrated Catalogue, 49.)  

    13th Annual Illustrated Catalogue of the Busiest House in America Containing Illustrations and Prices of a Few Leading and Staple Styles of Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry Silverware, Clocks, Canes, Umbrellas, Opera Glasses, Gold Spectacles, Eye Glasses, Etc. Salem, WV: Busiest House in America, 1889.

  12. 7

    A metal or glass container with a perforated top used for table condiments. Casters were often decorated and sold as matched sets with a metal stand. (“Caster,” in American Dictionary [1828]; see also 13th Annual Illustrated Catalogue, 40–47.)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

    13th Annual Illustrated Catalogue of the Busiest House in America Containing Illustrations and Prices of a Few Leading and Staple Styles of Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry Silverware, Clocks, Canes, Umbrellas, Opera Glasses, Gold Spectacles, Eye Glasses, Etc. Salem, WV: Busiest House in America, 1889.

  13. 8

    A metal or glass container with a perforated top used for table condiments. Casters were often decorated and sold as matched sets with a metal stand. (“Caster,” in American Dictionary [1828]; see also 13th Annual Illustrated Catalogue, 40–47.)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

    13th Annual Illustrated Catalogue of the Busiest House in America Containing Illustrations and Prices of a Few Leading and Staple Styles of Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry Silverware, Clocks, Canes, Umbrellas, Opera Glasses, Gold Spectacles, Eye Glasses, Etc. Salem, WV: Busiest House in America, 1889.

  14. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  15. 9

    A condiment jar for table salt, often decorative. (See 13th Annual Illustrated Catalogue, 49.)  

    13th Annual Illustrated Catalogue of the Busiest House in America Containing Illustrations and Prices of a Few Leading and Staple Styles of Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry Silverware, Clocks, Canes, Umbrellas, Opera Glasses, Gold Spectacles, Eye Glasses, Etc. Salem, WV: Busiest House in America, 1889.

  16. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  17. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  18. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  19. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  20. 10

    Abbreviation for creamware, or cream-colored earthenware, an inexpensive ceramic produced in the 1830s that was light in color. (Miller, “A Revised Set of CC Index Values,” 1.)  

    Miller, George L. “A Revised Set of CC Index Values for Classification and Economic Scaling of English Ceramics from 1787 to 1880.” Historical Archaeology 25, no. 1 (1991): 1–25.

  21. 11

    “A close vessel for containing liquors, formed by staves, heading and hoops. This is a general term comprehending the pipe, hogshead, butt, barrel, etc.” (“Cask,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  22. new scribe logo

    Insertion in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  23. 12

    “A close vessel for containing liquors, formed by staves, heading and hoops. This is a general term comprehending the pipe, hogshead, butt, barrel, etc.” (“Cask,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  24. 13

    Probably a reference to the law firm of Payne & Willson. Henry Payne and Hiram Willson formed a law firm in Cleveland, Ohio in 1835. The partnership continued until 1844, when a new partner was added and the firm was renamed.  

  25. new scribe logo

    Postage in unidentified handwriting; likely a postmaster.  

  26. new scribe logo

    Postmark stamped in blue ink in upper left corner of folded letter.  

  27. new scribe logo

    Docket in unidentified handwriting.