Invoice, G. C. Coit to Rigdon, Smith & Cowdery, 18 June 1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

June 18th 1836
Messrs
, O.
Bought of G[urdon] C Coit
No. 178 Main Street
No [Number] 1 6 P[iece]s Light Prints 1972 112 $22.72
[No] 2 10 [Ps Light Prints] 3192 1/ 39.94
[No] 3 1 [Ps Light Prints] 273 15 4.16
[No] 4 4 [Ps Light] Stripe [Prints] 1411 16 22.60
[No] 5 3 [Ps Light] Super [Prints] 93 162 15.35
[No] 6 4 [Ps Light Super Prints] 1171 17 19.93
[No] 7 3 [Ps Light] Super [Prints] 91 17 15.47
[No] 8 6 [Ps] Dark [Super Prints] 1932 20 38.79
[No] 9 4 [Ps] Light [Super] Merrimac [Prints] 1342 22 29.64
[No] 10 4 [Ps Light Super] Dover [Prints] 1312 22 28.93
[No] 11 5 [Ps Light Super] Chintz [Prints] 146 28 40.88
[No] 12 1 [Ps] Dark [Super] Twilld [Prints] 22 28 28 7.84
[No] 13 2 [Ps Dark Super] Chintz [Prints] 56 29 16.24
[No] 14 1 [Ps Dark Super] Manchester [Prints] 28 33 9.24
4 [Ps] Blue [Super] Merrimac [Prints] 1133 182 21.04
3 [Ps] Furniture [Prints] 95 943 16 15.16
3 [Ps] Super [Furniture] Chintz 953 22 21.07
1 [Ps] Canvass Padding 422 21 8.92
1 [Ps] Red [Padding] 53 40 21.11 21.20
1 [Ps] 7/ 8 Ticking 373 21 7.93
1 [Ps] 6/ 4 Utica [Ticking] 212 34 14.28
1 [Ps] 4/ 4 Birds Eye Diaper 312 17 5.36
1 [Ps] 3/ 4 Bleachd Shirting 341 102 4.60
1 [Ps 3/ 4 Bleachd Shirting] 33 112 3.79
2 [Ps] 7/ 8 [Bleachd] Superfine [Shirting] 63 152 9.77
2 [Ps] 4/ 4 [Bleachd Superfine Shirting] 582 17 9.44
3 [Ps] 4/ 4 [Bleachd Superfine Shirting] 1041 21 21.89
2 [Ps] 5/ 4 [Bleachd] Elliott [Superfine Shirting] 583 162 9.69
2 [Ps] 5/ 4 [Bleachd] Elliott [Superfine Shirting] 612 222 13.84
1 [Ps] Pantaloon Stuff 44 17 7.48
1 [Ps] Merino Cassimere 48 21 10.08
1 [Ps] Dark Pantalon Suff 31 20 6.20
1 [Ps] Constitution Twill 492 24 11.88
<​535.35​> Carried Foward, $535.35
[p. [1]]
Brought Forward $535.35
1 Ps [Piece] Canton Cord 33. 29 9.57
No. [Number] 44 1 [Ps] Blk 8.50 8.50.
[No.] 45 1 [Ps] Super [Circassian Merino] 9.50 9.50
1 [Ps] 7/ 8 [Super] White Flannel 24 55 13.20
1 [Ps 7/ 8 Super] Yellow [Flannel] 10 56 5.60
1 [Ps Super] Red [Flannel] 35¼ 45 15.86
1 [Ps] Extra Super Olive Broad Cloth 112 4.25 48.88
1 [Ps Extra Super] Bro. Goats Hair Camblet 243 8/ 24.75
1 [Ps] 6/ 4 [Extra Super] French Bombazine 73 18/ 17.44
1 [Ps] Plaid Drilling 18¾ 1/ 6 3.52
1 [Ps] Plain French Chambray Gingham (1 Y[ar]d off for hole) 30 24. 7.20
1 [Ps] D[ar]k [Plain French Chambray Gingham] 22½ 24 5.40
3 [Ps] French Plaid Gingham 821 24 19.74
2 [Ps French Plaid Gingham] 60 26 15.60
4 [Ps] Super [Ps French Plaid Gingham] 1203 29 35.02
2 [Ps Super French] Dark [Plaid Gingham] 60 28 16.80
2 [Ps] Bro Drilling 64 15 9.60
2 [Ps] Suffolk [Drilling] 573 172 10.10
2 [Ps] Sheeting to line Boxes 9 1/ 1.13
5 [Ps] 5 doz[en] Cotton Flagg Hdkf [Handkerchief] 14/ 8.75
2 [Ps] 3½ [doz Cotton] Turkey Red [Flagg Hdkf] 16/ 7.00
1 [Ps] 1¼ [doz Cotton Flagg Hdkf] 18/ 2.81
3 [Ps] Silk [Flagg Hdkf] 18/ 6.75
1 [Ps Silk Flagg Hdkf] 24/ 3.00
2 [Ps Silk Flagg Hdkf] 36/ 4.50 9.00
1 [Ps] Large [Silk Flag Hdkf] 42/ 5.25
2 [Ps Large] Pongee [Silk Flagg Hdkf] 5.75 11.50
1 [Ps] Eng Spettlefield [Silk Flagg Hdkf] 6.00 6.00
2 [Ps Eng Spettlefield] Twilld [Silk] [Flagg Hdkf] 7.00 14.00
1 [Ps] 20 Barceloned [Twilld Silk Hdkf] 11.50
1/2 doz Vest Patterns 4.50 2.25
1/2 [doz] Supr [Vest Patterns] 6.50 3.25
1 [doz] White Gause [Gauze] Vails [Veils] 15.00
2 [White] Super [Gause Vails] 18/ 4.50
2 Green [Super Vails] 18/ 4.50
2 doz Plain Muslin Collars 20/ 2.50 5.00
Carried Forward $932.82
[p. [2]]
Bro[ugh]t Forward $932.82
1 doz[en] Figured Swiss Collars 20/ 2.50
1 [doz Figured Swiss] Double capes [Collars] 20/ 2.50
1 [doz] Suspenders a little damaged 12/ 1.50
1 [doz Suspenders a little damaged] 10/ 1.25
1 [doz Suspenders] 8/ 1.00
1 [doz] Super Buck Skin Gloves 11.00 11.50 11.00
2 [doz] Ladies col[ore]d Kid [Gloves] 28/ 7.00
1 [doz] Blk Wostd Hoze [Hose] 44/ 5.50
1/2th Cold Sewing Silk 9.50 4.75
1th Blk India [Sewing Silk] 8.50 8.50
1/2th Blk Italian [Sewing Silk] 12.00 10.50 6.00 5.25
1/2th [Blk Sewing] Twist 12.00 6.00
2 th [Blk] Thread 7/ 1.75
2 th [Blk Thread] 9/ 2.25
1 th White Cotton [Thread] 8/ 1.00
2 th Ball [Cotton Thread] 7/ 1.75
2 Bunches Wht [Cotton Thread] 2/ 0.50
2 [Bunches] Cold [Thread] 3/ 0.75
2 doz Neck Combs 8/ 2.00
1 [doz] Top [Combs] 0.90
2 [doz Top Combs] 8/ 2.00
5/ 12 [doz] Supr Fancy Top Brazilian/ $8.00 3.33
4 [doz] Cotton Tapes 1/ 0.50
6 [doz] Linen [Tapes] 30 1.80
1 Gro[ss] Lasting Buttons 6/ 0.75
2 [doz] Large Flexible Eyd Lasting Buttons 10/ 2.50
6 Fancy Raw Silk Shawls 12/ 9.00
9 Merino [Shawls] 16/ 18.00
2 Stripd [Merino Shawls] 22/ 5.50
4 Cashmere [Shawls] 16/ 8.00
3 7/ 4 Merino Super [Shawls] $6.00 18.00
2 7/ 4 White [Merino Shawls] $7.00 14.00
1 ps [piece] Blk French Crape 44/ 5.50
1 [ps Blk] Silk Velvet 33 20/ 9.38
1 [ps] Super Blue Blk [Silk Velvet] 26/ 21.94
1 [ps] 4/ 4 White Cambrick 12 20 2.40
1 [ps] 5/ 4 [White Cambrick] 12 2/ 3.00
Carried Forward $1,128.07 $1,126.07
[p. [3]]
Bro[ugh]t Forwrd. $1,126.07
1 ps [piece] 5/ 4 Super Cambrick 12. 43 5.16
1 [ps] 5/ 6 [Super] Jaconett [Cambrick] 12 3/ 4.50
1 [ps] Blk Lustring Silk 34 35 11.90
1 [ps Blk Lustring Silk] 742 45 33.53
1 [ps Blk] Gros De Swiss 30 60 18.00
1 [ps] Col[ore]d [Gros De Swiss] 1072 42 45.15
1 [ps Cold] Super [Gros De Swiss] 65. 68 44.20
1 [ps] Frgd [Gros De] Nap 183 33 11.55 6.19
1 [ps Frgd Gros De Nap] 35 33 11.58 11.55
2 [ps Frgd] Velvet 212 5/ 13.44
1 Bale Shirting 600 13 78.00
8 Yards [Shirting ] to line Box 1/— 1.00
3 Boxes & Cartage 20/ 2.50
1 Bale Palmd Leaf 450 0.04½ 20.25
$1,421.44
6 Fancy Tuscan & Straw Bonnets 20/ 15.00
6 Plain [Straw Bonnets] 18/ 13.50
2 Super [Plain Straw Bonnets] 4.50 9.00
1,458.94
1 doz[en] Leghorn B. Hats 15.00
1 Bandbox 4/ 0.50
Cr 1,474.44
By note 4 mo[nths] to the ordr 737.22
[By] Note 6 [mo to the ordr] 737.22 1,474.44
Rec[eive]d Pay[men]t. as p[e]r Statement above
G. C. Coit
June 18t 1836
 
G. C. Coit’s
Bill $1474.44.
Dry Goods [p. [4]]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    A “cotton cloth of plain, sometimes damask or diaper weave, made with hard spun, fine warp, often taped and a much coarser, slack twist filling, printed with flowers, birds, and other patterns, in bright colors on white or colored ground, and glazed by calendaring.” Often used for furniture or drapery. (“Chintz,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 39.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  2. 2

    Linen or cotton fabric used for mattresses or pillows. (“Ticking,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 363; “Ticking,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 155.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  3. 3

    Any type of woven cloth patterned with a “small, diamond pattern with a dot in the center,” resembling a bird’s eye. (“Birdseye,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 20; “Bird’s-eye,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 169.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  4. 4

    A linen or cotton twill woven fabric with a diamond pattern. (“Diaper,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 218.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  5. 5

    Cloth made from the wool of Merino sheep. (“Merino,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 294.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  6. 6

    A plain woven or twilled woolen or worsted fabric with a soft finish; used for men’s clothing. (“Cassimere,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 35.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  7. 7

    A type of corduroy. (“Constitution,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 43.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  8. new scribe logo

    Insertion in unidentified handwriting .  

  9. 8

    A ribbed cotton cloth in which the warp passes over many weft threads to form cords. (“Canton,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 191.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  10. 9

    This was a fancy twill woven fabric made to simulate cashmere. (“Circassian,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 200.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  11. 10

    Cloth made from the wool of Merino sheep. (“Merino,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 294.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  12. 11

    A camblet or camlet was a plain weave used for clothing, furniture, and hangings; made from goat’s hair, part silk or linen, or wool. (“Camlet,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 188.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  13. 12

    Cloth made of silk warp and worsted weft in a serge or twill weave. Black bombazine was used for mourning garments. (“Bombazine,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 172, 175.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  14. 13

    A strong linen or cotton fabric often used for trousers or military uniforms. (“Drill,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 225; “Drill,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 57.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  15. 14

    “Plain woven light dress goods, made of cotton or silk with a dark blue, brown, black, etc., warp and white filling.” (“Chambray,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles,, 37.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  16. 15

    A light, plain woven cotton fabric. (“Sheeting,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 141.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  17. 16

    A bright red dye produced by the madder. (“Turkey Red,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 158.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  18. 17

    A clothing and curtain fabric with Chinese origins woven from uneven threads of silk. It was originally a tan color but in the early nineteenth century was often dyed. (“Pongee,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 327.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  19. 18

    This was silk made in Spitalfields, England. Spitalfields, located on the outskirts of London, was considered the center of silk weaving. (“Spitalfields,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 350.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  20. 19

    These were handkerchiefs “originally made in Spain,” made from “fine twilled silk” and available “in plain colors, checks and fancy patterns.” (“Barcelona Handkerchiefs,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 15.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  21. 20

    A fabric having a colored design on the textile face. (“Figured,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 64.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  22. 21

    Another term for cotton yarn. (“Twist,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 159.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  23. 22

    Twelve dozen or 144 items. (“Gross,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  24. 23

    This refers to everlasting, a stout, tightly woven cloth generally used for ladies’ shoes. It was also used in the nineteenth-century United States for lightweight summer coats. (“Everlasting,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 235–236.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  25. 24

    Cloth made from the wool of Merino sheep. (“Merino,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 294.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  26. 25

    A light, plain woven fabric typically made from cotton or linen. (“Cambric,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 31.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  27. 26

    A light, plain woven fabric typically made from cotton or linen. (“Cambric,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 31.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  28. 27

    Jaconet was a fine cotton fabric, originally from East India, used for dresses. It was thicker than muslin but thinner than nainsook. (“Jaconet,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 82; “Jaconet,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 269.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  29. 28

    A crisp, light silk with high luster. (“Lustring,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America,, 283.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  30. 29

    A French silk fabric with cross ribs on the face. (“Gros de Suisse,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 74.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  31. 30

    TEXT: Possibly short for “Gros de Naples,” a plain woven silk fabric from Italy used for coats or hats. (“Gros de Naples,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 74.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  32. 31

    The cost associated with transporting goods, which were originally transported by cart. (“Cartage,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  33. 32

    Summer hats woven from the fine, yellow straw from the tops of bleached wheat stalks. The bonnet originated in Tuscany, Italy. (“Tuscan,” in Dreher, From the Neck Up, 194.)  

    Dreher, Denise. From the Neck Up: An Illustrated Guide to Hatmaking. Minneapolis: Madhatter Press, 1981.

  34. 33

    Named after the Port of Livorno (traditionally “Leghorn” in English) in Italy, leghorn hats were composed of Tuscan straw, from braids of thirteen, five, or seven strands. Its strength and stiffness were desirable characteristics of a shade hat. (Aiken, Millinery Department, 16–17.)  

    Aiken, Charlotte Rankin. The Millinery Department. New York: Ronald Press Company, 1918.

  35. 34

    “A slight paper box for bands, caps, bonnets, muffs, or other light articles.” (“Bandbox,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  36. new scribe logo

    Docket in handwriting of Oliver Cowdery.  

  37. new scribe logo

    Docket in unidentified handwriting.