Invoice, M. H. Birge to Rigdon, Smith & Cowdery, 17 June 1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

June 17, 1836
Messrs
Bo[ugh]t of M[artin] H. Birge
2 P[iece]s 6/ 4 Ticking 54 40 21.60
A 1 [Ps] 7/ 8 [Ticking] 321 28 <​Error​> 9.03
B 1 [Ps 7/ 8 Ticking] 32 2/— 8.00
1 [Ps] 3/4 [Ticking] 46 15 6.90
2 [Ps] Buckram 50 1/— 6.25
1 [Ps] Apron Check 19 2/ 6 5.69
1 [Ps Apron Check] 9 2/— 2.25
1 [Ps Apron Check] 20 1/ 6 3.75
1 [Ps] Nankin Blue 28 1/ 6— 5.25
3 [Ps] Domestic Plaid 111 2/4 111¼ 1/ 3 <​do​> 17.38
6 [Ps] Col[ore]d Cambric 1842 11— <​do​> 20.29
1 [Ps] Printed Jean 282 3/ 6— 12.69
1 [Ps] Blk Bombasett [Bombazet] 7½. 7.50
6 Cotton Umbrellas 80 4.80
1 [Ps] Red Padding 25 3/— 9.37
1 [Ps] Green Baize 11 4/6 6.19
1 [Ps] Striped Jean 32 20 6.40
1 [Ps] Moleskin 9 3/— 3.38
1 [Ps Moleskin] 26 5/— 16.25
1 [Ps] Checked Drilling 143 4/— 7.37
1 [Ps] Blk Cloth 12 5.00 60.00
1 [Ps] Super Blue [Cloth] 7 8.00 56.00
1 [Ps Super Blue Cloth] 5½. 5½. 30.25
1 [Ps] Super Blue [Cloth] 143 3⅜ 49.79
1 [Ps] Violet [Cloth] 291 20/— <​do​> 73.12
1 [Ps] Blk [Cloth] 263 20/ 66.87
1 [Ps] Plaid Cassimere 143 20/— 36.88
1 [Ps] Striped [Cassimere] 133 153 18/— 35.44
1 [Ps] Drab [Cassimere] 3.00 16.50
1 [Ps] Rib[be]d [Cassimere] 103 18/— 24.19
1 Ps Bobinet Lace 11 6/— 8.25
1 [Ps Bobinet Lace] 9 5/— 5.62
1 [Ps Bobinet Lace] 92 4/— <​do​> 4.75
1 [Ps Bobinet Lace] 10 3/— 3.75
1 [Ps Bobinet Lace] 10 2/— 2.55 2.00
$654.25
[p. [1]]
Amount Bro[ugh]t forward $654.25
No [Number] 90 2 P[iece]s Footing Lace 872 7 6.12
[No] 81 50 2 [Ps Footing Lace] 691 6d 4.33
[No] 50 2 [Ps Footing Lace] 87 3 2.61
[No] 24 1 [Ps Footing Lace] 76 22 <​do​> 1.90
3 [Ps Footing Lace] 203 2 4.06
[No] 26 1 [Ps Footing Lace] 83 22 2.07
2 [Ps] Edging [Lace] 72 6d 1.62
1 [Ps] Edging [Lace] 48 5 2.40
1 [Ps] Edging [Lace] 48 4 1.92
1 [Ps] Edging [Lace] 36 32 1.26
2 [Ps] Edging [Lace] 66 3 1.98
1 [Ps] French Bombasine 10 130 13.00
1 [Ps French Bombasine] 10 20/— 25.00
1 [Ps] Buff Vesting 22 4/— 1.25
1 [Ps Vesting] 21 4/— 1.12
2 [Ps] Checkd [Vesting] 53 4/— 2.88
1 [Ps] Buff [Vesting] 62 6/— 4.87
1 [Ps] Striped [Vesting] 61 8/— 6.13
4 Bundlles Ball Thread 8/— 4.00
2 Doz Suspenders 22/— 5.50
1 Ps Irish Linen 14/— 4/— 7.00
1 [Ps Irish Linen] 13 5/— 8.12
1 [Ps Irish Linen] 12 6/— 9.00
1 [Ps Irish Linen] 122 8/— 12.50
1 [Ps] Purple Silk 262 6/— 19.87
1 [Ps] Blk [Silk] 772 58 44.95
1 [Ps] Sarcenet [Silk] 18.00 18.00
1 [Ps] Sinchew [Sinchaw] [Silk] 21.00 21.00
1/2 Doz Prusian Shawls 4½. 2.25
1/2 [Doz Prusian Shawls] 6.00 3.00
3 Valentia [Shawls] 1½. 4.50
2 Plaid [Prussian Shawls] 14/— 3.50
3 Blk & Green [Shawls] 10/— 3.75
3 Red [Shawls] 6/— 2.25
6 Gross Prunella Buttons 4/— 3.00
2 [Gross Prunella Buttons] 8/— 2.00
18 Doz Spools Thread 2/— 4.50
12 Bundlles [Thread] 2/3 3.37
$920.83
[p. [2]]
Am[oun]t Brought forward 920.85 920.83
1 Ps [Piece] Silk Hdkfs [Handkerchiefs] 7 0.70 4.90
1 [Ps] Flag [Hdkfs] 7 0.75 5.25
1 [Ps] Flag [Hdkfs] 7 4/— 3.50
6 Large Fancy [Hdkfs] 15 10/ 7.50
6 Figurd Satin [Hdkfs] 5/— 3.75
10 Light Gauge [Hdkfs] 7/. 8.75
2 Blue Hernani 8/— 2. 00
1 Ps Red [Hernani] 7/ 4/— 3.50
1 [Ps] Lino 71 55 <​do​> 3.99
1 Bale Indian Head Sheeting 800 15 120.00
4 ps Eagle [Sheeting] 1072 1/— 13.44
1 Bale Shirting 538 102 56.49
100 lbs Cotton Yarn 5 to 10 34 34.00
50 Ps Paper 20 10.00
50 [Ps Paper] 2/— 12.50
50 [Ps Paper] 3/— 18.75
$1,229.15
1 [Ps] Blk Cloth (6 nitted) 73 6.50 59.37 51.37
$1279.52
<​in Trunk​> 2 [Ps] Super English Prints 56— 29 16.24
1 Gross Quality Binding 5/ 0.62
1 ps Blue Plaid Ribon 4.00 4.00
<​1 short 12/=​> 2 [ps Blue] & Green Cap [Ribbon] 12/— 3.00
1 [ps Blue Cap Ribbon] 7/— 0.88
1 [ps] Blowell Edgd [Ribbon] 4 1/ 4 0.66
1 [ps] Printed Muslin 25 3/— 9.37
1 [ps Printed Muslin] 24 4/ 6 13.50
1 [ps Printed Muslin] 16 2/ 6 4.75
2 Packing Bales 12/— 6/— 2.25
$1334.79
<​4/ 6​>
[p. [3]]
M H. Birge
Bill 1334 79/ 100 Doll[ar]s due dec. 17, 1836
Dry Goods [p. [4]]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    Linen or cotton fabric used for mattresses or pillows. (“Ticking,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 363; “Ticking,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 155.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  2. new scribe logo

    Insertion in unidentified handwriting.  

  3. 2

    A “plain woven or twilled coarse, open fabric” made of hemp, cotton yarn, or hair. It was used for hat shapes if sized; when not lined, it was used for under-lining and as a stiffener for clothes. (“Buckram,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 27.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  4. 3

    Also spelled “nankeen,” this originally referred to a type of yellow plain woven cotton fabric manufactured in China, although it was frequently dye blue or other colors. The term was applied to this type of fabric regardless of where it was manufactured. (“Nankeen” and “Nankin,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 110; “Nankeen,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 308.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  5. 4

    Cotton goods manufactured in the United States. (“Domestics,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 222; “Domestics,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 54.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  6. new scribe logo

    Insertion in unidentified handwriting.  

  7. 5

    A light, plain woven fabric typically made from cotton or linen. (“Cambric,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 31.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  8. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  9. 6

    A twilled fabric often made out of cotton and linen used primarily for trousers. (“Jean,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 271.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  10. 7

    A worsted cloth that could be twilled or plain woven and was finished without a glaze; similar to bombazine. (“Bombazet,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 172.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  11. 8

    A coarse, heavy woolen flannel used for lining, bags, or table coverings. (“Baize,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 152; “Baize,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 13.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  12. 9

    A strong linen or cotton fabric often used for trousers or military uniforms. (“Drill,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 225; “Drill,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 57.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  13. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  14. 10

    A plain woven or twilled woolen or worsted fabric with a soft finish; used for men’s clothing. (“Cassimere,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 35.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  15. 11

    Bobbinet was a “machine-made, hexagonal net, used for quillings, trimmings, etc.” It is also possible that the clerk made an error here and was referring instead to bobbin lace, a type of lace made by working bobbins or bones around pins in a cushion to produce a pattern. (“Bobbinnet,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 22; “Bobbin Lace,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 171.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  16. new scribe logo

    Graphite insertion in unidentified handwriting.  

  17. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  18. 12

    Cloth made of silk warp and worsted weft in a serge or twill weave. Black bombazine was used for mourning garments. (“Bombazine,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 172, 175.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  19. 13

    A generic term for fabric intended to manufacture waistcoats. (“Vesting,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 372.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  20. 14

    A type of thin, transparent silk weave. (“Sarcenet,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 339.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  21. 15

    A type of silk imported from China. (“Sinchaw,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America, 349.)  

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  22. 16

    A fringed shawl made of twilled cotton with printed designs. (“Prussian Shawls,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 128.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  23. 17

    Possibly either a strong cotton fabric used for uniforms or a fabric made from cotton, silk, and wool typically used for waistcoat. (“Velencia or Valentia,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 160; “Valencia,” in Montgomery, Textiles in America,, 369.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

    Montgomery, Florence M. Textiles in America: 1650–1870. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1984.

  24. 18

    Twelve dozen or 144 items. (“Gross,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  25. 19

    Metal-shanked buttons. (Lossing, History of American Industries and Arts, 166.)  

    Lossing, Benson J. History of American Industries and Arts. Philadelphia: Porter and Coates, 1878.

  26. 20

    TEXT: Possibly Gauze.  

  27. 21

    A French fabric made of silk and wool. (“Hernani,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 78.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  28. 22

    A type of lightweight fabric with crossing warp threads. (“Leno,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 91.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  29. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  30. 23

    A light, plain woven cotton fabric. (“Sheeting,” in Harmuth, Dictionary of Textiles, 141.)  

    Harmuth, Louis. Dictionary of Textiles. New York: Fairchild Publishing Company, 1915.

  31. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  32. 24

    Twelve dozen or 144 items. (“Gross,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  33. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  34. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney.  

  35. new scribe logo

    Docket in handwriting of Oliver Cowdery.  

  36. new scribe logo

    Docket in unidentified handwriting.