Revelation, circa 8 March 1831–B [D&C 47]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

50th March 8th. 1831
Given at Geauga Ohio— given to in consequenc[e] of not feeling reconsiled to write at the request of Joseph with[o]ut a commandment &c
Behold it is expedient that my servent should write & keep a regulal [regular] history & assist my servent Joseph in Transcribing all things which shall be given him And again verily I say unto you that ye can can also lift [p. 79] Up your voice in Meetings when ever it shall be expedient & again I say unto you that it shall be appointed unto you to Keep the Church Record & History continually for I have appointed to an other office wherefore it shall be given thee by th[e] comforter to write these things even so amen [p. 80]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    In dating this revelation, Revelation Book 2 lists “March 7th. 1831” while the Book of Commandments simply has “March 1831.” (Revelation Book 2, p. 12; Book of Commandments 50.)  

  2. 2

    John Whitmer likely created this heading when he copied the text into Revelation Book 1. In Revelation Book 2, a partial table of contents on a sheet attached to its frontispiece describes this revelation as “A Revelation to John Whitmer calling him to be a hystorian to the church.” (Revelation Book 2, Index, [1].)  

  3. 3

    On 8 March 1831 or soon thereafter John Whitmer began “transcribing” (that is, copying) JS’s translation of the Old Testament while JS and Sidney Rigdon moved on to the New Testament, as they had been commanded in a revelation dictated a short time before. (Faulring et al., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible, 586; Revelation, ca. 7 Mar. 1831 [D&C 45:60–61]; New Testament Revision 1, p. 1.)  

    Faulring, Scott H., Kent P. Jackson, and Robert J. Matthews, eds. Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible: Original Manuscripts. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2004.

    New Testament Revision 1 / “A Translation of the New Testament Translated by the Power of God,” 1831. CCLA. Also available in Scott H. Faulring, Kent P. Jackson, and Robert J. Matthews, eds., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible: Original Manuscripts (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2004), 153–228.