Revelation, September 1830–F [D&C 31]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

34th AD 1830
A Revelation to his call to the ministiry &c gaven at Seneca County State of New York
my Son Blessed art thou Be[c]ause of thy faith in my words Behold thou hast had many afflictions because of thy family Nevertheless I will bless thee & thy family yea thy little ones & the day cometh that they will believe & know the truth & be one with thee in my lift up your heart & rejoice for the hour of your Mishion mission is come & thy tongue shall be loosed & thou shalt declare glad tidings of great joy unto this generation thou shalt declare the things which have been revealed unto my Servent Joseph thou shalt begin to preach from this time forth yea to Reap in the field which is white already to be burned Therefore thrust in thy Sickle with all thy Soul & thy sins are forgiven thee & thou shalt be laden with sheaves upon thy Back for the labourer is worthy of his hire Wherefore thy family shall live Behold Verily I say unto you go from them only for a little time & declare my word & I will prepare a place for them yea I will open the hearts of the People & they will Receive thee & I will establish a church by thy hand & thou shalt strengthen them & prepare them against the time when the shall be[.] be patient in afflictions & sufferings revile not against [p. 43] Those that revile govern thy house in meekness & be steadfast Behold I say unto you that thou shalt be a P[h]ysician unto the Church but not unto the World for they will not receive thee go thy way whithersoever I will & it shall be given thee by the Comforter what thou shalt do & whither thou shalt go pray always lest ye enter into temptation & loose thy reward be faithful unto the end & Lo! I am with you these words are not of man neither of men but of me even Jesus Christ your Redeemer by the will of the father even so amen [p. 44]

Footnotes

  1. 1

    John Whitmer likely created this heading when he copied the text into Revelation Book 1.  

  2. 2

    Edward Partridge’s early copy of this revelation, only partially extant, has “me.” (Revelation, Sept. 1830–F, in Partridge, Copies of Revelations [D&C 31:2].)  

    Partridge, Edward. Copies of Revelations, ca. Dec. 1830–Spring 1831. CHL. MS 1133.

  3. 3

    By her own account, Marsh’s wife, Elizabeth, did not become a believer until 1831, when her son Nephi was born. At the time of this revelation, Marsh had three “little ones”: Edward B., age nine (born 13 August 1821); James G., age seven (31 May 1823); and Thomas E., age three (26 March 1827). James joined the church, but no information is known about the other Marsh children. (Thomas B. Marsh and Elizabeth Godkin Marsh to Lewis Abbott and Ann Marsh Abbott, [ca. 11 Apr. 1831], Abbott Family Collection, CHL; “T B Marsh,” [3], Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL; Obituary for James G. Marsh, Elders’ Journal, July 1838, 48.)  

    Abbott Family Collection, 1831–2000. CHL. MS 23457.

    Historian’s Office. Histories of the Twelve, 1856–1858, 1861. CHL. CR 100 93.

    Elders’ Journal of the Church of Latter Day Saints. Kirtland, OH, Oct.–Nov. 1837; Far West, MO, July–Aug. 1838.

  4. 4

    See John 4:35; see also Letter to Newel Knight and the Church in Colesville, 28 Aug. 1830.  

  5. 5

    Marsh served multiple proselytizing missions between 1831 and 1835. (Revelation, 15 June 1831 [D&C 56:5]; “T B Marsh,” [1]–[2], Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL; Revelation, 25 Jan. 1832–B [D&C 75:31]; and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, Record, 4 May 1835.)  

    Historian’s Office. Histories of the Twelve, 1856–1858, 1861. CHL. CR 100 93.

  6. 6

    See Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 295–296 [Alma 26:5].  

  7. 7

    On the subject of gathering, see Historical Introduction to Revelation, Sept. 1830–A [D&C 29].  

  8. 8

    See 1 Peter 2:23.  

  9. 9

    Two accounts in Marsh’s brief autobiography indicate that during the early years of his church membership he was called upon to act in a medical capacity. While en route from Ohio to Missouri, he was summoned to care for a “br. Blackslee” suffering from cholera but was unable to reach him in time to treat him. Another time he cared for Joseph Knight, who was “sick with the bloody flux,” or dysentery. (“T B Marsh,” [1]–[2], Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL.)  

    Historian’s Office. Histories of the Twelve, 1856–1858, 1861. CHL. CR 100 93.