Appendix: Orson Pratt, A[n] Interesting Account of Several Remarkable Visions, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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appearance of gold. Each plate was not far from seven by  eight inches in width and length, being not quite as thick  as common tin. They were filled on both sides with en gravings, in Egyptian characters, and bound together in a  volume, as the leaves of a book, and fastened at one edge  with three rings running through the whole. This vo lume was something near six inches in thickness, a part of  which was sealed. The characters or letters upon the un sealed part were small, and beautifully engraved. The  whole book exhibited many marks of antiquity in its con struction, as well as much skill in the art of engraving.  With the records was found “a curious instrument, called  by the ancients the Urim and Thummim, which consisted of  two transparent stones, clear as crystal, set in the two rims  of a bow. This was in use, in ancient times, by persons  called seers. It was an instrument, by the use of which,  they received revelation of things distant, or of things past  or future.”
In the mean time, the inhabitants of that vicinity, having  been informed that Mr Smith had seen heavenly visions,  and that he had discovered sacred records, began to ridicule  and mock at those things. And after having obtained  those sacred things, while proceeding home through the  wilderness and fields, he was waylaid by two ruffians, who  had secreted themselves for the purpose of robbing him of  the records. One of them struck him with a club before  he perceived them; but being a strong man, and large in  stature, with great exertion he cleared himself from them,  and ran towards home, being closely pursued until he came  near his ’s house, when his pursuers, for fear of being  detected, turned and fled the other way.
Soon the news of his discoveries spread abroad through out all those parts. False reports, misrepresentations, and  base slanders, flew as if upon the wings of the wind in  every direction. The house was frequently beset by mobs  and evil designing persons. Several times he was shot at,  and very narrowly escaped. Every device was used to get  the plates away from him. And being continually in dan ger of his life, from a gang of abandoned wretches, he at  length concluded to leave the place, and go to ; and, accordingly, packed up his goods, putting the  plates into a barrel of beans, and proceeded upon his jour [p. 13]
appearance of gold. Each plate was not far from seven by eight inches in width and length, being not quite as thick as common tin. They were filled on both sides with engravings, in Egyptian characters, and bound together in a volume, as the leaves of a book, and fastened at one edge with three rings running through the whole. This volume was something near six inches in thickness, a part of which was sealed. The characters or letters upon the unsealed part were small, and beautifully engraved. The whole book exhibited many marks of antiquity in its construction, as well as much skill in the art of engraving. With the records was found “a curious instrument, called by the ancients the Urim and Thummim, which consisted of two transparent stones, clear as crystal, set in the two rims of a bow. This was in use, in ancient times, by persons called seers. It was an instrument, by the use of which, they received revelation of things distant, or of things past or future.”
In the mean time, the inhabitants of that vicinity, having been informed that Mr Smith had seen heavenly visions, and that he had discovered sacred records, began to ridicule and mock at those things. And after having obtained those sacred things, while proceeding home through the wilderness and fields, he was waylaid by two ruffians, who had secreted themselves for the purpose of robbing him of the records. One of them struck him with a club before he perceived them; but being a strong man, and large in stature, with great exertion he cleared himself from them, and ran towards home, being closely pursued until he came near his ’s house, when his pursuers, for fear of being detected, turned and fled the other way.
Soon the news of his discoveries spread abroad throughout all those parts. False reports, misrepresentations, and base slanders, flew as if upon the wings of the wind in every direction. The house was frequently beset by mobs and evil designing persons. Several times he was shot at, and very narrowly escaped. Every device was used to get the plates away from him. And being continually in danger of his life, from a gang of abandoned wretches, he at length concluded to leave the place, and go to ; and, accordingly, packed up his goods, putting the plates into a barrel of beans, and proceeded upon his jour [p. 13]
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