Appendix: Orson Pratt, A[n] Interesting Account of Several Remarkable Visions, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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FACTS
in relation to the late discovery of
ANCIENT AMERICAN RECORDS.
 
Mr Joseph Smith, jun., who made the following im portant discovery, was born in the town of Sharon, Wind sor county, Vermont, on the 23d of December, a.d. 1805.  When ten years old, his parents, with their family, moved  to , New York; in the vicinity of which he resid ed for about eleven years, the latter part in the town of  . Cultivating the earth for a livelihood was  his occupation, in which he employed the most of his  time. His advantages, for acquiring literary knowledge,  were exceedingly small; hence, his education was limited  to a slight acquaintance with two or three of the common  branches of learning. He could read without much diffi culty, and write a very imperfect hand; and had a very  limited understanding of the ground rules of arithmetic.  These were his highest and only attainments; while the  rest of those branches, so universally taught in the com mon schools throughout the , were entirely  unknown to him. When somewhere about fourteen or  fifteen years old, he began seriously to reflect upon the neces sity of being prepared for a future state of existence: but  how, or in what way, to prepare himself, was a question,  as yet, undetermined in his own mind: he perceived that it  was a question of infinite importance, and that the salva tion of his soul depended upon a correct understanding  of the same. He saw, that if he understood not the [p. [3]]
FACTS
in relation to the late discovery of
ANCIENT AMERICAN RECORDS.
 
Mr Joseph Smith, jun., who made the following important discovery, was born in the town of Sharon, Windsor county, Vermont, on the 23d of December, a.d. 1805. When ten years old, his parents, with their family, moved to , New York; in the vicinity of which he resided for about eleven years, the latter part in the town of . Cultivating the earth for a livelihood was his occupation, in which he employed the most of his time. His advantages, for acquiring literary knowledge, were exceedingly small; hence, his education was limited to a slight acquaintance with two or three of the common branches of learning. He could read without much difficulty, and write a very imperfect hand; and had a very limited understanding of the ground rules of arithmetic. These were his highest and only attainments; while the rest of those branches, so universally taught in the common schools throughout the , were entirely unknown to him. When somewhere about fourteen or fifteen years old, he began seriously to reflect upon the necessity of being prepared for a future state of existence: but how, or in what way, to prepare himself, was a question, as yet, undetermined in his own mind: he perceived that it was a question of infinite importance, and that the salvation of his soul depended upon a correct understanding of the same. He saw, that if he understood not the [p. [3]]
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