Discourse, 8 April 1843, as Reported by William Clayton–B

  • Source Note
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<per about April 8 <1843>>
<reported by >
Prest. Joseph called upon the choir to sing a him [hymn] and remarked that “tenor charms the ear— bass the heart.” After sing the president spoke in substance as follows.
I have three requests to make of the congregation The first is that all who have faith may <will> exercise it that the Lord may be willing to calm the wind. The next is, that I may have your prayers that the Lord may strengthen my lungs so that I may be able to make you all hear. And the next is, that I may have the Holy Ghost to rest upon me so as to enable me to declare those things that are true.
The subject I intend to speak upon this morning is one that I have seldom touched upon since I commenced as an Elder of the Church. It is a subject of great speculation as well amongst the Elders of the church as amongst the divines of the day; it is in relation to the beast spoken of in Revelations. The reason why it has been a subject of speculation amongst the Elders, is in consequence of a division of sentiment and opinion in relation to it. may My object is to do away with this difference of opinion. The knowledge of this subject is not very essential to the Elders. To have knowledge in relation to the meaning of beasts with seven <and> heads and ten horns and <other> figure made use of in the revalations is not very essential to the Elders. If we get puffed up by thinking that we have much knowledge, and <we are apt to> get a contentious spirit, and knowledge is necessary to do away contention. The evil of being puffed up is not so great as the evil of contention. Knowledge does away darkness, suspense and doubt, for where Knowledge is there is no doubt nor suspense nor darkness. There is no pain so awful as the pain of suspense. This is the condemnation of the wicked; Their doubt and anxiety and suspense causes weeping, wailing and gnashing of teeth. In knowledge there is power. God has more power than all other beings, because he has greater knowledge, and hence he knows how to subject all other beings to him.
I will endeavour to instruct you in relation to the meaning of the beasts and figures spoken of. Er (Pelatiah) Brown has been the cause of the <this> subject being now presented before you. He, is one of the wisest old heads we have among us, has been called up before the High Council on account of the beast. The old man has preached concerning the [p. 1]
April 8 1843
reported by
Prest. Joseph called upon the choir to sing a him [hymn] and remarked that “tenor charms the ear— bass the heart.” After sing the president spoke in substance as follows.
I have three requests to make of the congregation The first is that all who have faith will exercise it that the Lord may be willing to calm the wind. The next is, that I may have your prayers that the Lord may strengthen my lungs so that I may be able to make you all hear. And the next is, that I may have the Holy Ghost to rest upon me so as to enable me to declare those things that are true.
The subject I intend to speak upon this morning is one that I have seldom touched upon since I commenced as an Elder of the Church. It is a subject of great speculation as well amongst the Elders of the church as amongst the divines of the day; it is in relation to the beast spoken of in Revelations. The reason why it has been a subject of speculation amongst the Elders, is in consequence of a division of sentiment and opinion in relation to it. My object is to do away with this difference of opinion. . To have knowledge in relation to the meaning of beasts and heads and horns and other figure made use of in the revalations is not very essential to the Elders. If we get puffed up by thinking that we have much knowledge, we are apt to get a contentious spirit, and knowledge is necessary to do away contention. The evil of being puffed up is not so great as the evil of contention. Knowledge does away darkness, suspense and doubt, for where Knowledge is there is no doubt nor suspense nor darkness. There is no pain so awful as the pain of suspense. This is the condemnation of the wicked; Their doubt and anxiety and suspense causes weeping, wailing and gnashing of teeth. In knowledge there is power. God has more power than all other beings, because he has greater knowledge, and hence he knows how to subject all other beings to him.
I will endeavour to instruct you in relation to the meaning of the beasts and figures spoken of. Er (Pelatiah) Brown has been the cause of this subject being now presented before you. He, one of the wisest old heads we have among us, has been called up before the High Council on account of the beast. The old man has preached concerning the [p. 1]
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