Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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stifled the ears of the prisoners. The same night,  , and , were liberated from jail,  that they might have an interview with their brethren,  and try to persuade them to leave the ; and  on their return to jail, about 2 o’clock on Tuesday  morning, in custody of the sheriff, an armed force of  six or seven men, stood near the jail and hailed; they  were answered by the sheriff, who gave his name and  the names of his prisoners, crying, “don’t fire, don’t  fire, the prisoners are in my charge,” &c. They  however fired one or two guns, when and   retreated; stood, with several guns  pointed at him. Two, more desparate than the rest,  attempted to shoot, but one of their guns flashed, and  the other missed fire. was then knocked  down by Thomas Wilson. About this time a few of  the inhabitants arrived, and again entered  jail; from which he and three others were liberated  about sunrise, without further prosecution of the trial.  The same morning, November 5th, the town began  to be crowded with armed men from every quarter,  and it was said the militia had been called out, under  the sanction of , and that one had the command. Among this militia, (so  called) were embodied the most conspicuous charac ters of the mob. Very early on the same morning,  several branches of the Church on hearing of the out rages in , volunteeered, and united their  forces, and marched towards town to defend their  brethren. When within one mile of , they halt ed, and were soon informed that the militia were  called out for their protection. But in this they pla ced little confidence; for the body congregated had  every appearance of a county mob, which subsequent  events soon verified. On application to ,  it was found that there was no alternative but for the  Church to leave the forthwith; and to deliver  up certain men to be tried for murder said to have [p. 19]
stifled the ears of the prisoners. The same night, , and , were liberated from jail, that they might have an interview with their brethren, and try to persuade them to leave the ; and on their return to jail, about 2 o’clock on Tuesday morning, in custody of the sheriff, an armed force of six or seven men, stood near the jail and hailed; they were answered by the sheriff, who gave his name and the names of his prisoners, crying, “don’t fire, don’t fire, the prisoners are in my charge,” &c. They however fired one or two guns, when and retreated; stood, with several guns pointed at him. Two, more desparate than the rest, attempted to shoot, but one of their guns flashed, and the other missed fire. was then knocked down by Thomas Wilson. About this time a few of the inhabitants arrived, and again entered jail; from which he and three others were liberated about sunrise, without further prosecution of the trial. The same morning, November 5th, the town began to be crowded with armed men from every quarter, and it was said the militia had been called out, under the sanction of , and that one had the command. Among this militia, (so called) were embodied the most conspicuous characters of the mob. Very early on the same morning, several branches of the Church on hearing of the outrages in , volunteeered, and united their forces, and marched towards town to defend their brethren. When within one mile of , they halted, and were soon informed that the militia were called out for their protection. But in this they placed little confidence; for the body congregated had every appearance of a county mob, which subsequent events soon verified. On application to , it was found that there was no alternative but for the Church to leave the forthwith; and to deliver up certain men to be tried for murder said to have [p. 19]
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