Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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compelled to flee; and those who fled to , were soon expelled, or the most part of them,  and had to move wherever they could find protection.
When the news of these outrages reached the of the , courts of enquiry, both civil and  military, were ordered by him; but nothing effectual  was ever done to restore our rights, or to protect us in  the least. It is true the attorney general, with a mili tary escort and our witnesses, went to and demanded indictments, but the court and ju rors refused to do any thing in the case, and the mili tary and witnesses were mobbed out of the ,  and thus that matter ended. The also or dered them to restore our arms which they had taken  from us, but they were never restored; and even our  lands in that were robbed of their timber,  and either occupied by our enemies for years, or left  desolate.
Soon after had rebelled against the  laws and constitution, several of the adjoining counties  followed her example by justifying her proceedings,  and by opposing the saints in settling among them;  and soon this rebellion became general in the upper  country. The counties of , , Clinton, and  various others, held public meetings, the tenor of  which was, to deprive the members of our society of  the common rights of citizenship, and to drive them  from among them, and force them to settle only in  such places as the mob should dictate; and even at  that time some of their proceedings went so far as to  publicly threaten to drive the whole Society from the  . The excuses they offered for these outrages,  were, 1st, The Society were principally guilty of be ing eastern or northern people. 2nd, They were  guilty of some slight variations, in manners and lan guage, from the other citizens of the . 3rd, Their  religious principles differed in some important parti culars from most other societies. 4th, They were [p. 24]
compelled to flee; and those who fled to , were soon expelled, or the most part of them, and had to move wherever they could find protection.
When the news of these outrages reached the of the , courts of enquiry, both civil and military, were ordered by him; but nothing effectual was ever done to restore our rights, or to protect us in the least. It is true the attorney general, with a military escort and our witnesses, went to and demanded indictments, but the court and jurors refused to do any thing in the case, and the military and witnesses were mobbed out of the , and thus that matter ended. The also ordered them to restore our arms which they had taken from us, but they were never restored; and even our lands in that were robbed of their timber, and either occupied by our enemies for years, or left desolate.
Soon after had rebelled against the laws and constitution, several of the adjoining counties followed her example by justifying her proceedings, and by opposing the saints in settling among them; and soon this rebellion became general in the upper country. The counties of , , Clinton, and various others, held public meetings, the tenor of which was, to deprive the members of our society of the common rights of citizenship, and to drive them from among them, and force them to settle only in such places as the mob should dictate; and even at that time some of their proceedings went so far as to publicly threaten to drive the whole Society from the . The excuses they offered for these outrages, were, 1st, The Society were principally guilty of being eastern or northern people. 2nd, They were guilty of some slight variations, in manners and language, from the other citizens of the . 3rd, Their religious principles differed in some important particulars from most other societies. 4th, They were [p. 24]
Page 24